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  • 1.
    Backteman-Erlanson, Susann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jacobsson, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Caring for traffic accident victims: the stories of nine male police officers2011In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological strain due to the work environment is common, especially in those occupations which involve working in critical situations. Working as a police officer seems to increase the risk of psychological problems such as symptoms of stress and post traumatic stress disorders. The aim of this study was to describe male police officers’ experiences of traumatic situations when caring for victims of traffic accidents, and to reflect the results through the perspective of gender theories. Nine police officers were asked to narrate and reflect upon their experiences in taking care of people who had been severely injured in traffic accidents. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The findings are presented in three themes: “being secure with the support system”, “being confident about prior successful actions, and “being burdened with uncertainty”. The officers’ descriptions showed that most of them had strategies that they used when they were first responders, developed on the basis of their own knowledge and actions and the support systems in their organization which enabled them to act in traumatic situations. When support systems, knowledge, and actions were insufficient, they sometimes felt insecure and “burdened with uncertainty”. In this male-dominated context, there was a risk that the officers may not talk enough about traumatic situations, thus influencing their ability to cope successfully.

  • 2.
    Backteman-Erlanson, Susann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Exploration of the WOCQ tool in relation to gender and psychometric properties among Swedish patrolling police officersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Police work is a stressful occupation with frequent exposure to traumatic events. In Sweden knowledge about coping strategies among police personnel is absent probably due to lack of validated measurements. Aim of this study was to explore psychometric properties of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WOCQ) among Swedish police personnel, including testing differential item functioning (DIF) for gender. The WOCQ was sent out to 1554 randomly selected patrolling police officers in Sweden. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used. A six factor solution was confirmed with differences and similarities compared to the original eight factor solution. DIF analysis showed similarities and differences in relation to gender. We suggest that the WOCQ can be used when investigating coping strategies in a Swedish police context.

     

  • 3.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sundin, Eva C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wiberg, Britt
    Division of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottinham, United Kingdom.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Individual brief art therapy can be helpful for women with breast cancer: A randomized controlled clinical study2009In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Recent research shows that almost every second woman with breast cancer is depressed or has anxiety; the risk for younger women is even higher. Moreover, research shows that women are at risk for developing depression, also a threat for women with breast cancer. The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to study the outcome of five sessions of art therapy given at a 5-week period of postoperative radiotherapy.

    Methods: The participants were between 37 and 69 years old; six participants in each group were below 50 years of age. Half of the participants (n = 20) received art therapy and the other half (n = 21) were assigned to a control group. At the first measurement, at least 17% (n = 7) of the participants medicated with antidepressants. Data were collected before and after art therapy and at a 4-month follow-up using self-rating scales that measure self-image (the Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour) and psychiatric symptoms (the Symptom Check List–90).

    Results: At follow-up, significant lower ratings of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and less general symptoms were reported for the art therapy group compared to the control group. The regression analysis showed that art therapy relates to lower ratings of depression, anxiety, and general symptoms; chemotherapeutic treatment predicts lower depressive symptoms; in contrast to axilliary surgery and hormonal treatment as well as being a parent predicts higher ratings of anxiety and general symptoms.

    Significance of results: The conclusion suggests that art therapy has a long-term effect on the crisis following the breast cancer and its consequences.

  • 4.
    Emilsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Mellannorrlands Hosp AB, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    Olsson, Karolina
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences from having breast cancer and being part of a support group: Notes written in diaries by women during radiotherapy2012In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of breast cancer patients participating in a support group.

    Method:This study explores 28 stories of women with breast cancer as expressed through written diaries. Diaries were written during a 5-week period in parallel with radiotherapy and participation in a support group in a hospital. Answers to six open-ended evaluative questions concerning the support group were included in the majority of the written diaries. A qualitative content analysis was used to identify themes.

    Results:Three themes were constructed during the analysis: "positive group development." "Inhibited group development." and "the individual living with the disease." Hopes and fears for the future in regards to illness and getting better, the value of family and friends, and feelings related to daily life with breast cancer such as fatigue and changes in body image were also expressed in the diaries.

    Significance of results:The findings suggest that the women with breast cancer found it valuable to be able to share experiences with other women in a similar situation in the context of a support group. Being part of such a group provided a space and an opportunity for reflection.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Lina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lindberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    The meaning of occupation for patients in palliative care when in hospital2016In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 541-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how patients in palliative care relate to occupation during hospitalization and to define the meaning it has for them. Eight inpatients in palliative care with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed one time. These interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Patients experience occupations as meaningful when in hospital during the last period of their lives. They would like to be able to handle their own needs as much as possible. Staff behavior, the design of the environment, the lack of accessible occupations, and the degree to which patients can decide whether to receive or decline visits affect the possibility to make their wishes a reality. Our results also revealed that patients experience a sense of loss of their role, as well as a lack of control and participation. Our results confirm the importance of occupation and of patients having the option to and being given opportunities to take care of themselves when in palliative care. Further studies are needed to enable us to understand how organized occupations might influence patients' experience of being in a hospital during the final period of life.

  • 6. Høye, Sevald
    et al.
    Kvigne, Kari
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Encounters between multicultural family members and the nurses in the context of intensive care2015In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940 (Print); 2324-7959 (Online), Vol. 3, no 1, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in people on the move creates populations that are culturally diverse. People meet various challenges regarding the migration process, social life, jobs and health issues. When a person suffers from acute and critical illness, he/she may be in need of intensive care. The aim of this study was to explore the comprehension of culture, caring and gender among first and second generation immigrant women as relatives on their encounters with intensive care nurses in Norwegian hospitals. A design based upon discursive psychology to explore subject positions, interpretative repertoires and ideological dilemmas focused immigrant female relatives’ experiences with a cultural and gender perspective. Immigrants who were relatives to critically ill people were interviewed. The results of the discourse analysis revealed the following themes: being the caring person as woman, being intertwined between the Western hospital culture and the original family culture and belonging to a minority in a Western majority culture. Conclusion: The women in the families with a critically ill family member mainly act as the caring person. There are dilemmas in how much every family transfer the responsibility for their loved one to the nurses. Anxious attitudes regarding caring activities are rarely linked to their cultural background.

  • 7.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    'They don't understand…you cut yourself in order to live.': Interpretative repertoires jointly constructing interactions between adult women who self-harm and professional caregivers2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 7254-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to illuminate interpretative repertoires that jointly construct the interaction between adult women who self-harm and professional caregivers in psychiatric inpatient care. Participant observations and informal interviews were conducted among six women who self-harm and their professional caregivers in two psychiatric inpatient wards, and analysed using the concept of interpretative repertoires from the discipline of discursive psychology. The analysis revealed four interpretative repertoires that jointly constructed the interaction. The professional caregivers used a "fostering repertoire" and a "supportive repertoire" and the women who self-harmed used a "victim repertoire" and an "expert repertoire." The women and the caregivers were positioned and positioned themselves and people around them within and among these interpretative repertoires to make sense of their experiences of the interaction. It was necessary to consider each woman's own life chances and knowledge about herself and her needs. The participants made it clear that it was essential for them to be met with respect as individuals. Professional caregivers need to work in partnership with individuals who self-harm-experts by profession collaborating with experts by experience. Caregivers need to look beyond behavioural symptoms and recognise each individual's possibilities for agency.

  • 8.
    Norberg, Monika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thyme, Karin Egberg
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Institutionen för Omvårdnad, kultur och hälsa, Universitet West, Trollhättan.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Breast Cancer Survivorship: Intersecting Gendered Discourses in a 5-Year Follow-Up Study2015In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 617-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present a follow-up study of women's interview narratives about life five to seven years after a breast cancer operation. The women had taken part in a study during the six-month post-operation period. Art therapy contributed to well-being, including strengthening personal boundaries. In the new study, interview analysis informed by critical discursive psychology indicated three problematic discourses that the women still struggled with several years after the operation: the female survivor, the "good woman", individual responsibility. We concluded that many women with a history of breast cancer need support several years after their medical treatment is finished.

  • 9.
    Ringnér, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Graneheim, Ulla H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Talking via the child: discursively created interaction between parents and health care professionals in a pediatric oncology ward2013In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 29-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe discursively constructed interactions between parents and health care professionals (HCPs) in a pediatric oncology ward. Field notes from 70 focused participant observations and 16 informal interviews with 25 HCPs interacting with 25 parents of children with cancer were analyzed using discursive psychology. Six dominant interpretative repertoires (flexible parts of discourses used in everyday interaction) were found. Repertoires used by the HCPs were child, parent, or family oriented, mirroring the primary focus of the interaction. Parents used a spokesperson repertoire to use their own expertise to talk on behalf of the child; an observer repertoire, in which they kept in the background and interfered only when needed; or a family member repertoire to position themselves on a level equal to the ill child. The results are discussed in relation to philosophies influencing pediatric nursing, such as family-centered nursing and child-centered nursing.

  • 10.
    Rydmell, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lagerfors, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Does Gender Matter?: Nurses' communications with children during blood test procedures2013In: Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, ISSN 1892-2678, E-ISSN 1892-2686, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 300-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equal opportunities for children are in general regarded as crucial; nevertheless, children are still often treated differently due to their sex. This could limit a child's inherent way of expressing him/herself. Nurses need to be aware of how gender constructions influence their interactions with children. The aim of this study was to illuminate interpretative repertoires that a group of nurses use when communicating with children during blood test procedures in two children's hospitals in Sweden. Data was collected by semi-structured observations of nurses conducting blood test procedures on children, and the observations were analyzed using discourse psychology. Two main groups of interpretative repertoires were found. In one group the repertoires were supporting gender stereotyping and in the other group the repertoires were weakening gender stereotyping. In conclusion, nurses' interactions with children during procedures offer the children different socially and culturally constructed interpretative repertoires about gender. Increased consciousness of gender issues is needed among nurses to enable children to be and act freely, without being forced into limited gendered expectations.

  • 11. Svensk, A. C.
    et al.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Emilsson, S.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Parfa, A.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Conversational support group participation during radiotherapy period helps women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer2015In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 51, p. S232-S232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Sjödin, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Eisemann, Martin
    Department of Psychology, University of Tromsøe, Tromsøe, Norway.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Art therapy improves experienced quality of life among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer: A randomized controlled study2009In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with breast cancer are naturally exposed to strain related to diagnosis and treatment, and this influences their experienced quality of life (QoL). The present paper reports the effect, with regard to QoL aspects, of an art therapy intervention among 41 women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer. The women were randomized to an intervention group with individual art therapy sessions for 1 h/week (n = 20), or to a control group (n = 21). The WHOQOL-BREF and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-BR23, were used for QoL assessment, and administrated on three measurement occasions, before the start of radiotherapy and 2 and 6 months later. The results indicate an overall improvement in QoL aspects among women in the intervention group. A significant increase in total health, total QoL, physical health and psychological health was observed in the art therapy group. A significant positive difference within the art therapy group was also seen, concerning future perspectives, body image and systemic therapy side effects. The present study provides strong support for the use of art therapy to improve QoL for women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer.

  • 13.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Klingstedt, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sharing experiences in a support group: men's talk during the radiotherapy period for prostate cancer2013In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 331-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men, is often treated with radiotherapy, which strains both physical and mental health. This study aimed to describe the experiences of men living with prostate cancer shared within conversational support groups during a course of radiotherapy. Method: Nine men participated in one of two groups that met six or seven times, led by a professional nurse. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify themes and subthemes in the recorded group conversations. Results: The analysis resulted in six themes: living with a changing body, being in the hands of others, learning to live with the disease, the importance of knowledge, everyday life support, and meeting in the support group. The men discussed a wide variety of bodily experiences and described support from healthcare professionals, relatives, friends, and the support group as crucial to their recovery. Significance of results: Meeting men in a similar situation, sharing experiences of living with the disease, and feeling allied to each other were important to the men in our study. The conversational support group provided the patient with prostate cancer a forum where sharing was made possible.

  • 14.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Art therapy for women with breast cancer: the therapeutic concequences of boundary strenghtening2007In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 277-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 2001 and 2004, 42 women with breast cancer (20 women in the study group and 22 women in the control group) participated in an intervention study involving art therapy. This article elaborates on previous quantitative results, taking a discursive approach and drawing on gender theories in analyzing the women's use of interpretative repertoires in interviews and diaries and their answers on single items of the Coping Resources Inventory (CRI). The aim was to inquire into whether and, if so, how and with what consequences women with breast cancer who participated in art therapy improved their access to beneficial cultural interpretative repertoires, compared to a control group. The results showed a connection between participation in art therapy, talking about protecting one's own boundaries, and scoring higher on the CRI compared to the control group. There was also a connection between the control group, repertoire conflicts, and lower scores on the CRI. Our interpretation is that art therapy became a tool the women could use to distinguish cultural understandings about boundaries and, through image making and reflections, to give higher legitimacy to their own interpretations and experience.

  • 15.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Thyme Egberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sjõdin, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Aström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Art therapy improves coping resources: a randomized, controlled study among women with breast cancer.2006In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Women with breast cancer suffer from considerable stress related to the diagnosis, surgery, and medical treatment. It is important to develop strategies to strengthen coping resources among these women. Research in art therapy has shown outcomes such as an increase in self-esteem and cohesion, significant improvement in global health, and a decrease in anxiety and depression. The aim of the present article was to describe the effects of an art therapy intervention program on coping resources in women with primary breast cancer. METHOD: In this article, we report some of the results from a study including 41 women, aged 37-69 years old, with nonmetastatic primary breast cancer, referred to the Department of Oncology at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden for postoperative radiotherapy. The women represented various socioeconomic backgrounds. They were randomized to a study group (n = 20) with individual art therapy for 1 h/week during postoperative radiotherapy or to a control group (n = 21). The article focuses on changes in coping resources, as measured by the Coping Resources Inventory (CRI) before and 2 and 6 months after the start of radiotherapy. The study protocol was approved by the Umeå University Ethical Committee at the Medical Faculty (archive number 99-386). RESULTS: There was an overall increase in coping resources among women with breast cancer after taking part in the art therapy intervention. Significant differences were seen between the study and control groups in the social domain on the second and third occasions. Significant differences were also observed in the total score on the second occasion. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: This study shows that individual art therapy provided by a trained art therapist in a clinical setting can give beneficial support to women with primary breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy, as it can improve their coping resources.

  • 16.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Edberg Thyme, Karin
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Art therapy during radiotherapy – A five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer2014In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001 to 2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five to seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain 'Social relations' in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001 to 2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective.

  • 17.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Art therapy during radiotherapy: a five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer2014In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001-2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to at least four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five - seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain ‘Social relations’ in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001–2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective.

  • 18.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Women with breast cancer and gendered limits and boundaries: Art therapy as a safe space for enacting alternative subject positions2009In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes its starting point from certain results from our randomized study on art therapy with women with breast cancer. Previous results from this study showed significant benefits on coping, quality of life, and symptoms for women who participated in an art therapy intervention. Analyses of interviews and diaries showed that especially women from the intervention group had distanced themselves from traditionally gendered understandings about cultural limits and boundaries. The aim of this study was to gain further knowledge about how women with breast cancer who participated in the art therapy intervention gave meaning to the gendered limits and boundaries in their daily lives, and to trace their trajectories, in therapy, towards helpful management of restraining boundaries. When analyzing the women's verbal reflections on the therapy sessions, we discerned five subject positions, defining them as follows: being someone who reacts to violation attempts; actively connecting body and self; actively locating oneself and moving forward; being in a position to see important connections throughout life; and being able to acknowledge and harbour conflicting emotions. The results of the study suggest that art therapy served as a tool that helped the women to get access to subject positions that enabled them to protect and strengthen their boundaries. This involved challenging dominating discourses and reacting against perceived boundary violations. Art therapy offered a personal, physical, and pictorial “safe space” with opportunities to deal with complex existential experiences and issues, and also make important connections throughout life. Looking back and summarizing important experiences acted as a way to prepare oneself for the future and moving forward.

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