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  • 1. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 2. Arslan, Alan A.
    et al.
    Koenig, Karen L.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Shore, Roy E.
    Chen, Yu
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Circulating Estrogen Metabolites and Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women2014In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1290-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been hypothesized that predominance of the 2-hydroxylation estrogen metabolism pathway over the 16 alpha-hydroxylation pathway may be inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Methods: We examined the associations of invasive breast cancer risk with circulating 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone (16 alpha-OHE1), and the 2-OHE1: 16 alpha-OHE1 ratio in a case-control study of postmenopausal women nested within two prospective cohorts: the New York University Women's Health Study (NYUWHS) and the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort (NSMSC), with adjustment for circulating levels of estrone, and additional analyses by tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status. Levels of 2-OHE1 and 16 alpha-OHE1 were measured using ESTRAMET 2/16 assay in stored serum or plasma samples from 499 incident breast cancer cases and 499 controls, who were matched on cohort, age, and date of blood donation. Results: Overall, no significant associations were observed between breast cancer risk and circulating levels of 2-OHE1, 16 alpha-OHE1, or their ratio in either cohort and in combined analyses. For 2-OHE1, there was evidence of heterogeneity by ER status in models adjusting for estrone (P <= 0.03). We observed a protective association of 2-OHE1 with ER + breast cancer [multivariate-adjusted OR for a doubling of 2-OHE1, 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.94; P = 0.02)]. Conclusions: In this study, higher levels of 2-OHE1 were associated with reduced risk of ER + breast cancer in postmenopausal women after adjustment for circulating estrone. Impact: These results suggest that taking into account the levels of parent estrogens and ER status is important in studies of estrogen metabolites and breast cancer.

  • 3. Barekati, Zeinab
    et al.
    Radpour, Ramin
    Kohler, Corina
    Zhang, Bei
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lv, Qing
    Zheng, Hong
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Methylation profile of TP53 regulatory pathway and mtDNA alterations in breast cancer patients lacking TP53 mutations2010In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 19, no 15, p. 2936-2946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated promoter hypermethylation of TP53 regulatory pathways providing a potential link between epigenetic changes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations in breast cancer patients lacking a TP53 mutation. The possibility of using the cancer-specific alterations in serum samples as a blood-based test was also explored. Triple-matched samples (cancerous tissues, matched adjacent normal tissues and serum samples) from breast cancer patients were screened for TP53 mutations, and the promoter methylation profile of P14(ARF), MDM2, TP53 and PTEN genes was analyzed as well as mtDNA alterations, including D-loop mutations and mtDNA content. In the studied cohort, no mutation was found in TP53 (DNA-binding domain). Comparison of P14(ARF) and PTEN methylation patterns showed significant hypermethylation levels in tumor tissues (P < 0.05 and <0.01, respectively) whereas the TP53 tumor suppressor gene was not hypermethylated (P < 0.511). The proportion of PTEN methylation was significantly higher in serum than in the normal tissues and it has a significant correlation to tumor tissues (P < 0.05). mtDNA analysis revealed 36.36% somatic and 90.91% germline mutations in the D-loop region and also significant mtDNA depletion in tumor tissues (P < 0.01). In addition, the mtDNA content in matched serum was significantly lower than in the normal tissues (P < 0.05). These data can provide an insight into the management of a therapeutic approach based on the reversal of epigenetic silencing of the crucial genes involved in regulatory pathways of the tumor suppressor TP53. Additionally, release of significant aberrant methylated PTEN in matched serum samples might represent a promising biomarker for breast cancer.

  • 4. Barekati, Zeinab
    et al.
    Radpour, Ramin
    Lu, Qing
    Bitzer, Johannes
    Zheng, Hong
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Methylation signature of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, p. 244-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Invasion and metastasis are two important hallmarks of malignant tumors caused by complex genetic and epigenetic alterations. The present study investigated the contribution of aberrant methylation profiles of cancer related genes, APC, BIN1, BMP6, BRCA1, CST6, ESR-b, GSTP1, P14 (ARF), P16 (CDKN2A), P21 (CDKN1A), PTEN, and TIMP3, in the matched axillary lymph node metastasis in comparison to the primary tumor tissue and the adjacent normal tissue from the same breast cancer patients to identify the potential of candidate genes methylation as metastatic markers. Methods: The quantitative methylation analysis was performed using the SEQUENOM's EpiTYPER (TM) assay which relies on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Results: The quantitative DNA methylation analysis of the candidate genes showed higher methylation proportion in the primary tumor tissue than that of the matched normal tissue and the differences were significant for the APC, BIN1, BMP6, BRCA1, CST6, ESR-b, P16, PTEN and TIMP3 promoter regions (P<0.05). Among those candidate methylated genes, APC, BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 displayed higher methylation proportion in the matched lymph node metastasis than that found in the normal tissue (P<0.05). The pathway analysis revealed that BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 have a role in prevention of neoplasm metastasis. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed methylation heterogeneity between primary tumors and metastatic lesion. The contribution of aberrant methylation alterations of BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 genes in lymph node metastasis might provide a further clue to establish useful biomarkers for screening metastasis.

  • 5. Barton, Maria
    et al.
    Santucci-Pereira, Julia
    de Cicco, Ricardo Lopez
    Russo, Irma H.
    Ross, Eric A.
    Slifker, Michael
    Peri, Suraj
    Bordas, Pal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Russo, Jose
    Long noncoding RNAs in the postmenopausal breast and their role in cancer prevention2014In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 74, no 19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana
    et al.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Russo, Jose
    Russo, Irma H
    Bordás, Pal
    Ahman, Janet
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Li, Xiaochun
    de Cicco, Ricardo López
    Peri, Suraj
    Ross, Eric
    Russo, Patricia A
    Santucci-Pereira, Julia
    Sheriff, Fathima S
    Slifker, Michael
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Arslan, Alan A
    Characterization of a genomic signature of pregnancy identified in the breast2011In: Cancer Prevention Research, ISSN 1940-6207, E-ISSN 1940-6215, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 1457-1464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to comprehensively compare the genomic profiles in the breast of parous and nulliparous postmenopausal women to identify genes that permanently change their expression following pregnancy. The study was designed as a two-phase approach. In the discovery phase, we compared breast genomic profiles of 37 parous with 18 nulliparous postmenopausal women. In the validation phase, confirmation of the genomic patterns observed in the discovery phase was sought in an independent set of 30 parous and 22 nulliparous postmenopausal women. RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix HG_U133 Plus 2.0 oligonucleotide arrays containing probes to 54,675 transcripts, scanned and the images analyzed using Affymetrix GCOS software. Surrogate variable analysis, logistic regression, and significance analysis of microarrays were used to identify statistically significant differences in expression of genes. The false discovery rate (FDR) approach was used to control for multiple comparisons. We found that 208 genes (305 probe sets) were differentially expressed between parous and nulliparous women in both discovery and validation phases of the study at an FDR of 10% and with at least a 1.25-fold change. These genes are involved in regulation of transcription, centrosome organization, RNA splicing, cell-cycle control, adhesion, and differentiation. The results provide initial evidence that full-term pregnancy induces long-term genomic changes in the breast. The genomic signature of pregnancy could be used as an intermediate marker to assess potential chemopreventive interventions with hormones mimicking the effects of pregnancy for prevention of breast cancer.

  • 7.
    Bordás, Pál
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Cajander, Stefan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Early breast cancer deaths in women aged 40-74 years diagnosed during the first 5 years of organised mammography service screening in north Sweden2004In: Breast, ISSN 0960-9776, E-ISSN 1532-3080, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bordás, Pál
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Interval cancer incidence and episode sensitivity in the Norrbotten mammography screening programme, Sweden2009In: Journal of Medical Screening, ISSN 0969-1413, E-ISSN 1475-5793, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the interval cancer incidence, its determinants and the episode sensitivity in the Norrbotten Mammography Screening Programme (NMSP).

    SETTING: Since 1989, women aged 40-74 years (n = 55,000) have been invited to biennial screening by the NMSP, Norrbotten county, Sweden.

    METHODS: Data on 1047 invasive breast cancers from six screening rounds of the NMSP (1989-2002) were collected. We estimated the invasive interval cancer rates, rate ratios and the episode sensitivity using the detection and incidence methods. A linear Poisson-model was used to analyse association between interval cancer incidence and sensitivity.

    RESULTS: 768 screen-detected and 279 interval cancer cases were identified. The rate ratio of interval cancer decreased with age. The 50-59 year age group showed the highest rate ratio (RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.41-0.65) and the 70-74 year age group the lowest (RR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.15-0.36). The rate ratios for the early (0-12 months) and late (13-24 months) interval cancers were similar (RR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.15-0.22 and 0.20, 95% CI 0.17-0.24). There was a significantly lower interval cancer incidence in the prevalence round as compared with the incidence rounds. According to the detection method the episode sensitivity increased with age from 57% in the age group 40-49 years to 84% in the age group 70-74 years. The corresponding figures for the incidence method were 50% and 77%, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed an interval cancer incidence of 38% and the episode sensitivity of 62-73%, depending on the method of calculation. Our results are of clinically acceptable level and concert with the reference values of the European guidelines.

  • 9.
    Bordás, Pál
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Survival from invasive breast cancer among interval cases in the mammography screening programmes of northern Sweden2007In: Breast, ISSN 0960-9776, E-ISSN 1532-3080, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bordás, Pál
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Péntek, Zoltán
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Radiological review of interval cancer in the Norrbotten mammography screening program, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11. Brendle, Annika
    et al.
    Brandt, Andreas
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in chromosomal instability genes and risk and clinical outcome of breast cancer: a Swedish prospective case-control study.2009In: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 435-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a major characteristic of many cancers. We investigated whether putatively functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to CIN (CENPF, ESPL1, NEK2, PTTG1, ZWILCH, ZWINT) affect breast cancer (BC) risk and clinical outcome in a Swedish cohort of 749 incident BC cases with detailed clinical data and up to 15 years of follow-up and 1493 matched controls. As a main observation, carriers of the A allele of the CENPF SNP rs438034 had a worse BC-specific survival compared to the wild type genotype GG carriers (hazard ratio (HR) 2.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-5.90), although they were less likely to have regional lymph node metastases (odds ratio (OR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-1.01) and tumours of stage II-IV (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99). As there is increasing evidence that CENPF is associated with poor prognosis in patients with primary BC, further independent studies are needed to clarify the importance of genetic variation in the CENPF gene in the clinic.

  • 12. Brendle, Annika
    et al.
    Lei, Haixin
    Brandt, Andreas
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Polymorphisms in predicted microRNA-binding sites in integrin genes and breast cancer ITGB4 as prognostic marker.2008In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1394-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrins control the cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and play an important role in mediating cell proliferation, migration and survival. A number of important cancer-associated integrin genes can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to their target sites in the 3' untranslated regions. We examined the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in predicted miRNA target sites of six integrin genes (ITGA3, ITGA6, ITGAv, ITGB3, ITGB4 and ITGB5) on breast cancer (BC) risk and clinical outcome. Six SNPs were genotyped in 749 Swedish incident BC cases with detailed clinical data and up to 15 years of follow-up together with 1493 matched controls. We evaluated associations between genotypes and BC risk and clinical tumour characteristics. Survival probabilities were compared between different subgroups. As a novel finding, several SNPs seemed to associate with the hormone receptor status. The strongest association was observed between the A allele of the SNP rs743554 in the ITGB4 gene and oestrogen receptor-negative tumours [odds ratio 2.09, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 1.19-3.67]. The same SNP was associated with survival. The A allele carriers had a worse survival compared with the wild-type genotype carriers (hazard ratio 2.11, 95% CIs 1.21-3.68). The poor survival was significantly associated with the aggressive tumour characteristics: high grade, lymph node metastasis and high stage. None of the SNPs was significantly associated with BC risk. As the ITGB4 SNP seems to influence tumour aggressiveness and survival, it may have prognostic value in the clinic.

  • 13. Cai, Feng Feng
    et al.
    Kohler, Corina
    Zhang, Bei
    Chen, Wei Jie
    Barekati, Zeinab
    Garritsen, Henk SP
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Zhang, Jing Jie
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA as potential biomarkers in breast cancer2011In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 4267-4271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alterations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found in cancer patients, therefore informative mtDNA mutations could serve as biomarkers for the disease.

    Materials and Methods: The two hypervariable regions HVR1 and HVR2 in the D-Loop region were sequenced in ten paired tissue and plasma samples from breast cancer patients.

    Results: MtDNA mutations were found in all patients' samples, suggesting a 100% detection rate. Examining germline mtDNA mutations, a total of 85 mutations in the D-loop region were found; 31 of these mutations were detected in both tissues and matched plasma samples, the other 54 germline mtDNA mutations were found only in the plasma samples. Regarding somatic mtDNA mutations, a total of 42 mutations in the D-loop region were found in breast cancer tissues.

    Conclusion: Somatic mtDNA mutations in the D-loop region were detected in breast cancer tissues but not in the matched plasma samples, suggesting that more sensitive methods will be needed for such detection to be of clinical utility.

  • 14. Campa, Daniele
    et al.
    Claus, Rainer
    Dostal, Lucie
    Stein, Angelika
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Meidtner, Karina
    Boeing, Heiner
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Amiano, Pilar
    Huerta, José María
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Travis, Ruth C
    Allen, Naomi E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    van Kranen, Henk
    Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H
    Peeters, Petra H M
    van Gils, Carla H
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Chajes, Veronique
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Engel, Pierre
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Riboli, Elio
    Canzian, Federico
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Variation in genes coding for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC).2011In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 761-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensing/signalling intracellular protein which is activated by an increase in the cellular AMP:ATP ratio after ATP depletion. Once activated, AMPK inhibits fatty acid synthesis and the Akt-mTOR pathway, and activates the p53-p21 axis. All these molecular mechanisms are thought to play a key role in breast carcinogenesis. We investigated the genetic variability of four genes encoding AMPK (PRKAA1, PRKAA2, PRKAB1 and PRKAB2). Using a tagging approach and selecting SNPs we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. We tested association of tagging SNPs in our four candidate genes with breast cancer (BC) risk in a study of 1340 BC cases and 2536 controls nested into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Given the relevance of AMPK on fatty acid synthesis and the importance of body fatness as a BC risk factor, we tested association of SNPs and body-mass index as well. We observed no statistically significant association between the SNPs in the PRKAs genes and BC risk and BMI after correction for multiple testing.

  • 15. Campa, Daniele
    et al.
    Huesing, Anika
    Dostal, Lucie
    Stein, Angelika
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Boeing, Heiner
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Roswall, Nina
    Ostergaard, Jane Nautrup
    Overvad, Kim
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Larranaga, Nerea
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Zylis, Dimosthenis
    Karapetyan, Tina
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Cox, David
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Canzian, Federico
    Genetic variability of the forkhead box O3 and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer2011In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 979-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) has a wide range of functions: it promotes tumor suppression, cell cycle arrest, repair of damaged DNA, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and plays a pivotal role in promoting longevity. FOXO3 is a key downstream target of the PI3K-Akt pathway in response to cellular stimulation by growth factors or insulin and has been proposed as a bridge between ageing and tumor suppression. Three SNPs in the FOXO3 gene (rs3800231, rs9400239 and rs479744) that have been shown to be strongly and consistently associated with longevity, were examined in relation to PC risk in a case control study of 1571 incident PC cases and 1840 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). There was no statistically significant association between the SNPs and PC risk regardless of the model of inheritance (dominant, codominant and recessive). The associations were not modified by disease aggressiveness, circulating levels of steroid sex hormones, or IGFs or BMI. We conclude that polymorphisms in the FOXO3 gene that are associated with longevity are not major risk factors for PC risk, in this population of Caucasian men.

  • 16. Campa, Daniele
    et al.
    Hüsing, Anika
    McKay, James D
    Sinilnikova, Olga
    Vogel, Ulla
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Stegger, Jakob
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Zylis, Dimosthenis
    Oustoglou, Erifili
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Teucher, Birgit
    Fisher, Eva
    Boeing, Heiner
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Onland-Moret, N Charlotte
    van Gils, Carla H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Lund, Eiliv
    Chirlaque, María Dolores
    Sala, Núria
    Quirós, José Ramon
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Amiano, Pilar
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Travis, Ruth C
    Key, Timothy J
    Wareham, Nick
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Slimani, Nadia
    Chajes, Veronique
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Riboli, Elio
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Canzian, Federico
    The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism is not associated with body mass index and breast cancer risk2010In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 10, p. 563-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The single nucleotide polymorphism rs7566605, located in the promoter of the INSIG2 gene, has been the subject of a strong scientific effort aimed to elucidate its possible association with body mass index (BMI). The first report showing that rs7566605 could be associated with body fatness was a genome-wide association study (GWAS) which used BMI as the primary phenotype. Many follow-up studies sought to validate the association of rs7566605 with various markers of obesity, with several publications reporting inconsistent findings. BMI is considered to be one of the measures of choice to evaluate body fatness and there is evidence that body fatness is related with an increased risk of breast cancer (BC).

    METHODS: we tested in a large-scale association study (3,973 women, including 1,269 invasive BC cases and 2,194 controls), nested within the EPIC cohort, the involvement of rs7566605 as predictor of BMI and BC risk.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between this SNP and BMI, nor did we find any significant association between the SNP and an increased risk of breast cancer overall and by subgroups of age, or menopausal status.

  • 17. Campa, Daniele
    et al.
    McKay, James
    Sinilnikova, Olga
    Hüsing, Anika
    Vogel, Ulla
    Hansen, Rikke
    Overvad, Kim
    Witt, Petra
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Chajes, Veronique
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Boeing, Heiner
    Fisher, Eva
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Villarini, Anna
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Peeters, Petra
    van Gils, Carla
    Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H
    Lund, Eiliv
    Chirlaque, María
    Sala, Núria
    Suarez, Laudina
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Tsilidis, Kostas
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Riboli, Elio
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Lenoir, Gilbert
    Tavtigian, Sean
    Canzian, Federico
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk.2009In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the major enzyme of lipogenesis. It catalyzes the NADPH-dependent condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to produce palmitic acid. Transcription of the FAS gene is controlled synergistically by the transcription factors ChREBP (carbohydrate response element-binding protein), which is induced by glucose, and SREBP-1 (sterol response element-binding protein-1), which is stimulated by insulin through the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes encoding for ChREBP, SREBP and FAS (respectively, MLXIPL, SREBF1 and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases. Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall and by subgroups of age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use or BMI. On the other hand, we found that two SNPs in FASN were associated with BMI.

  • 18. Campanella, Gianluca
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fiorito, Giovanni
    Guarrera, Simonetta
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    de Kok, Theo M. C. M.
    Georgiadis, Panagiotis
    Kleinjans, Jos C. S.
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Lillycrop, Karen A.
    May, Anne M.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Murray, Robert
    Riboli, Elio
    Verschuren, Monique
    Lund, Eiliv
    Mode, Nicolle
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Fiano, Valentina
    Trevisan, Morena
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Froguel, Philippe
    Elliott, Paul
    Vineis, Paolo
    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
    Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases2018In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction.

    Methods: DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waist-height ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population.

    Results: We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P = 9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P = 6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P = 5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P = 1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P < 1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P < 1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

  • 19. Campanella, Gianluca
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fiorito, Giovanni
    Guarrera, Simonetta
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    de Kok, Theo M. C. M.
    Georgiadis, Panagiotis
    Kleinjans, Jos C. S.
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Lillycrop, Karen A.
    May, Anne M.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Murray, Robert
    Riboli, Elio
    Verschuren, Monique
    Lund, Eiliv
    Mode, Nicolle
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Fiano, Valentina
    Trevisan, Morena
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Froguel, Philippe
    Elliott, Paul
    Vineis, Paolo
    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
    Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases2018In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction. Methods DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waistheight ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population. Results We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P=9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P=6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P=5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P=1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P<1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P<1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors. Conclusion Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

  • 20. Canzian, Federico
    et al.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Cox, David G
    Henderson, Katherine D
    Henderson, Brian E
    Berg, Christine
    Bingham, Sheila
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buring, Julie
    Calle, Eugenia E
    Chanock, Stephen
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Dossus, Laure
    Feigelson, Heather Spencer
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Hankinson, Susan E
    Hoover, Robert
    Hunter, David J
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Pearce, Celeste Leigh
    Quiros, Jose R
    Riboli, Elio
    Stram, Daniel O
    Thomas, Gilles
    Thun, Michael J
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    van Gils, Carla H
    Ziegler, Regina G
    Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).2009In: BMC cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 9, p. 257-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). METHODS: We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. RESULTS: Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. CONCLUSION: Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  • 21. Chen, Tianhui
    et al.
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Wulff, Marianne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Schock, Helena
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    IGF-I during primiparous pregnancy and maternal risk of breast cancer2010In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 169-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, we reported that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I during early pregnancy is positively associated with maternal risk of breast cancer. To further explore this association, we designed a new study limited to women who donated a blood sample during their first pregnancy ending with childbirth. A case-control study was nested within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort in which repository since 1975, serum specimens remaining after early pregnancy screening for infectious diseases had been preserved. Study subjects were selected among women who donated a blood sample during the full-term pregnancy that led to the birth of their first child. Two hundred and forty-four women with invasive breast cancer were eligible. Two controls, matching the index case for age and date at blood donation were selected (n = 453). IGF-I was measured in serum samples on an Immulite 2000 analyzer. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A significant positive association of breast cancer with IGF-I was observed, with OR of 1.73 (95% CI: 1.14-2.63) for the top tertile, P < 0.009. Subgroup analyses did not indicate statistical heterogeneity of the association by ages at sampling and diagnosis or by lag time to cancer diagnosis, although somewhat stronger associations with risk were observed in women < or = age 25 at index pregnancy and for cases diagnosed within 15 years of blood donation. The results of the study add further evidence for an adverse effect of elevated IGF-I concentrations during early reproductive life on risk of breast cancer.

  • 22. Chen, Tianhui
    et al.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Wulff, Marianne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Schock, Helena
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Maternal hormones during early pregnancy: a cross-sectional study2010In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 719-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about correlates of first-trimester pregnancy hormones as in most studies maternal hormones have been measured later in gestation. We examined the associations of maternal characteristics and child sex with first-trimester maternal concentrations of four hormones implicated in breast cancer: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, and IGF-II. METHODS: About 338 serum samples donated to the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort (NSMC), 1975-2001, during the first trimester of uncomplicated pregnancies, were analyzed for the hormones of interest as a part of a case-control study. The associations of maternal characteristics and child sex with hormone concentrations were investigated by correlation, general linear regression, and multivariate regression models. RESULTS: In the first trimester, greater maternal age was inversely correlated with IGF-I and IGF-II. In comparison with women carrying their first child, already parous women had higher IGF-I but lower hCG. Greater maternal weight and smoking were inversely correlated with hCG. No differences in hormone levels by child sex were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses indicated that potentially modifiable maternal characteristics (maternal weight and smoking) influence first-trimester pregnancy maternal hormone concentrations.

  • 23. Clendenen, Tess V.
    et al.
    Ge, Wenzhen
    Koenig, Karen L.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Liu, Mengling
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Andersson, Anne
    Arslan, Alan A.
    Chen, Yu
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lenner, Per
    Kirchhoff, Tomas
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Shore, Roy E.
    Sund, Malin
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer: a nested case-control study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0140478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA) gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1), and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1). SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OH) D concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OH) D in our study (p-trend < 0.005). After taking into account the false discovery rate, these SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, nor were any of the other SNPs or haplotypes in VDR, RXRA, and CYP24A1. We observed no statistically significant associations between polymorphisms or haplotypes in key vitamin D-related genes and risk of breast cancer. These results, combined with the observation in this cohort and most other prospective studies of no association of circulating 25(OH) D with breast cancer risk, do not support an association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.

  • 24. Clendenen, Tess
    et al.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Wirgin, Isaac
    Koenig, Karen L
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Arslan, Alan A
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Försti, Asta
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Roy, Nirmal
    Shore, Roy E
    Chen, Yu
    Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, p. e69367-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms) in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  • 25. Dossus, Laure
    et al.
    McKay, James D
    Canzian, Federico
    Wilkening, Stefan
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Biessy, Carine
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Jakobsen, Marianne U
    Overvad, Kim
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Fournier, Agnes
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Boeing, Heiner
    Fisher, Eva
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Georgila, Christina
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Quirós, José Ramon
    Sala, Núria
    Martínez-García, Carmen
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Gils, Carla H
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay Tee
    Key, Tim J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Jenab, Mazda
    Riboli, Elio
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Polymorphisms of genes coding for ghrelin and its receptor in relation to anthropometry, circulating levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and breast cancer risk a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).2008In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1360-1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, has two major functions: the stimulation of the growth hormone production and the stimulation of food intake. Accumulating evidence also suggests a role of ghrelin in cancer development. We conducted a case-control study on 1359 breast cancer cases and 2389 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, to examine the association of common genetic variants in the genes coding for ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor (GHSR) with anthropometric measures, circulating insulin growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 and breast cancer risk. Pair-wise tagging was used to select the 15 polymorphisms that represent the majority of common genetic variants across the GHRL and GHSR genes. A significant increase in breast cancer risk was observed in carriers of the GHRL rs171407-G allele (odds ratio: 1.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.0-1.4; P = 0.02). The GHRL single-nucleotide polymorphism rs375577 was associated with a 5% increase in IGF-I levels (P = 0.01). A number of GHRL and GHSR polymorphisms were associated with body mass index (BMI) and height (P between <0.01 and 0.04). The false-positive report probability (FPRP) approach suggests that these results are noteworthy (FPRP < 0.20). The results presented here add to a growing body of evidence that GHRL variations are associated with BMI. Furthermore, we have observed evidence for association of GHRL polymorphisms with circulating IGF-I levels and with breast cancer risk. These associations, however, might also be due to chance findings and further large studies are needed to confirm our results.

  • 26. Duffy, SW
    et al.
    Chen, THH
    Smith, RA
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Törnberg, S
    Frisell, J
    Holmberg, L
    Effect of mammographic service screening on stage at presentation of breast cancers in Sweden.2007In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, Vol. 109, no 11, p. 2205-2212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Duffy, SW
    et al.
    Tabar, L
    Chen, THH
    Smith, RA
    Holmberg, L
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Lenner, Per
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Törnberg, S
    Reduction in breast cancer mortality from organized service screening with mammography: 1. Further confirmation with extended data.2006In: Cancer Epid Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 15, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Duffy, SW
    et al.
    Tabar, L
    Chen, THH
    Smith, RA
    Holmberg, L
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Törnberg, S
    Reduction in Breast Cancer Mortality from the Organised Service Screening with Mammography:: 2. Validation with Alternative Analytic Methods2006In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 15, p. 52-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Ferrari, Pietro
    et al.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Jenab, Mazda
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Touillaud, Marina
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    von Ruesten, Anne
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Grioni, Sara
    Panico, Salvatore
    Masala, Giovanna
    Tumino, Rosario
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Bakker, Marije F.
    van Gils, Carla H.
    Ros, Martine M.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Krum-Hansen, Sanda
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Pilar, Amiano
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Chirlaque, Dolores
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Travis, Ruth
    Key, Tim
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Slimani, Nadia
    Norat, Teresa
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Dietary fiber intake and risk of hormonal receptor-defined breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2013In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 344-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Limited scientific evidence has characterized the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer (BC) by menopausal status and hormone receptor expression in tumors. ' Objective: We investigated the relation between total dietary fiber and its main food sources (vegetables, fruit, cereals, and legumes) and BC risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: A total of 11,576 invasive BC cases in 334,849 EPIC women mostly aged 35-70 y at baseline were identified over a median follow-up of 11.5 y. Dietary fiber was estimated from country-specific dietary questionnaires. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to quantify the association between dietary variables and BC risk with energy adjustment by using the residual method. Subgroup analyses were performed by menopausal status and estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in tumors. Results: BC risk was inversely associated with intakes of total dietary fiber [hazard ratio comparing fifth quintile to first quintile (HRQ5-Q1): 0.95; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.01; P-trend = 0.03] and fiber from vegetables (0.90; 0.84, 0.96; P-trend < 0.01) but not with fiber from fruit, cereals, or legumes. Overall, associations were homogeneous by menopausal status and ER and PR expression in tumors. For vegetable fiber, stronger associations were observed for estrogen receptor-negative and progesterone receptor-negative (HRQ5-Q1: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.93; P-trend = 0.01) than for estrogen receptor-positive and progesterone receptor-positive tumors (0.92: 0.81, 1.03; P-trend = 0.05), with P-heterogeneity = 0.09. Conclusion: Diets rich in dietary fiber and, particularly, fiber from vegetables may be associated with a small reduction in risk of BC, independently of menopausal status. 

  • 30. Försti, A
    et al.
    Lei, H
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Enquist, K
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Altieri, A
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, K
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Polymorphisms in the genes of the urokinase plasminogen activation system in relation to colorectal cancer.2007In: Ann Oncol, ISSN 0923-7534, Vol. 18, p. 1990-1994Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Försti, Asta
    et al.
    Jin, Qianren
    Altieri, Andrea
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Wagner, Kerstin
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Grzybowska, Ewa
    Pamula, Jolanta
    Pekala, Wioletta
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Polymorphisms in the KDR and POSTN genes: association with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis.2007In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 83-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High iron levels can increase the formation of noxious oxygen radicals, which are thought to contribute to cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this prospective study was to determine if iron status and HFE genotypes constitute risk factors for stroke. Methods: First-ever stroke cases (231 ischemic and 42 hemorrhagic) and matched double referents from the population-based Northern Sweden cohorts were studied in a nested case-referent setting. Results: For total iron binding capacity, an increased risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.14-2.83; p for trend 0.012). The highest quartile of transferrin iron saturation showed a decreased risk of ischemic stroke in men (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.22-0.87; p for trend 0.028), but not in women. There was an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the second (OR 4.07; 95% CI 1.09-15.20) and third quartile (OR 4.22; 95% CI 1.08-16.42) of ferritin. Neither quartiles of plasma iron concentrations nor the HFE C282Y and H63D genotypes were associated with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: Iron stores were not positively related to increased risk of ischemic stroke. Furthermore, HFE genotypes did not influence the risk of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 32.
    Försti, Asta
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Li, Xuchen
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Wagner, Kerstin
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Altieri, Andrea
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Polymorphisms in the transforming growth factor beta 1 pathway in relation to colorectal cancer progression2010In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 270-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFB1) acts as a growth inhibitor of normal colonic epithelial cells, however, as a tumor promoter of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms in the TGFB1 pathway and CRC susceptibility and clinical outcome, we carried out a case-control study on a Swedish population of 308 CRC cases and 585 age- and gender-matched controls. The cases were sampled prospectively and had up to 16 years follow-up, making the study material particularly suitable for survival analysis. On the basis of their reported or predicted functional effect, nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TGFB1: Leu10Pro; TGFBR1: 9A/6A and IVS7G+24A; FURIN: C-229T; THBS1: T+42C; LTBP1L: C-256G; LTBP4: T-893G and Thr750Ala; BAMBI: T-779A) were selected for genotyping. We evaluated the associations between genotypes and CRC and Dukes' stage. Survival probabilities were compared between different subgroups. The observed statistically significant associations included a decreased CRC risk for TGFBR1 IVS7G+24A minor allele carriers (odds ratio (OR): 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.97), less aggressive tumors with Dukes' stage A+B for carriers of LTBP4 Thr750Ala and BAMBI T-779A minor alleles (OR: 0.58, 95%CI: 0.36-0.93 and OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.29-0.89, respectively) and worse survival for FURIN C-229T heterozygotes (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95%CI: 1.08-2.46). As this is the first study about the influence of the polymorphisms in the TGFB1 pathway on CRC progression, further studies in large independent cohorts are warranted.

  • 33. Gaudet, Mia M
    et al.
    Deubler, Emily L
    Kelly, Rachel S
    Diver, W Ryan
    Teras, Lauren R
    Hodge, James M
    Levine, Keith E
    Haines, Laura G
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Palli, Domenico
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A
    Blood Levels of Cadmium and Lead in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk in Three Prospective Cohorts.2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 5, p. 1010-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cadmium and lead have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, their associations with breast cancer risk are unknown despite their persistence in the environment and ubiquitous human exposure. We examined associations of circulating levels of cadmium and lead with breast cancer risk in three case-control studies nested within the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) LifeLink Cohort, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition - Italy (EPIC-Italy), and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS) cohorts. Metal levels were measured in stored erythrocytes from 1,435 cases and 1,433 controls using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random-effects models with each study result weighted by the within- and between-study variances. I2 values were calculated to estimate proportion of between study variation. Using common cut-points, cadmium levels were not associated with breast cancer risk in the CPS-II cohort (continuous RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.76 - 1.34), but were inversely associated with risk in the EPIC- Italy (continuous RR=0.80, 95% CI 0.61 - 1.03) and NSHDS cohorts (continuous RR=0.73, 95% CI 0.54 - 0.97). The inverse association was also evident in the meta-analysis (continuous RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.69 - 1.01) with low between-study heterogeneity. Large differences in lead level distributions precluded a meta-analysis of their association with breast cancer risk; no associations were found in the three studies. Adult cadmium and lead levels were not associated with higher risk of breast cancer in our large meta-analysis. 

  • 34. Göhler, S.
    et al.
    Da Silva Filho, M. I.
    Johansson, R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Enquist-Olsson, K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Henriksson, R.
    Hemminki, K.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, A.
    Functional germline variants in driver genes of breast cancer2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, p. S233-S233Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35. Göhler, Stella
    et al.
    Da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Cancer Center Stockholm Gotland, 10239 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Functional germline variants in driver genes of breast cancer2017In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 259-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Germline mutations in tumour suppressor genes cause various cancers. These genes are also somatically mutated in sporadic tumours. We hypothesized that there may also be cancer-related germline variants in the genes commonly mutated in sporadic breast tumours. Methods After excluding the well-characterized breast cancer (BC) genes, we screened 15 novel genes consistently classified as BC driver genes in next-generation sequencing approaches for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Altogether 40 SNPs located in the core promoter, 5'- and 3'-UTR or which were nonsynonymous SNPs were genotyped in 782 Swedish incident BC cases and 1,559 matched controls. After statistical analyses, further evaluations related to functional prediction and signatures of selection were performed. Results TBX3 was associated with BC risk (rs2242442: OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.92, dominant model) and with less aggressive tumour characteristics. An association with BC survival and aggressive tumour characteristics was detected for the genes ATR (rs2227928: HR = 1.63; 95% CI 1.00-2.64, dominant model), RUNX1 (rs17227210: HR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.42-8.61, recessive model) and TTN (rs2303838: HR = 2.36; 95% CI 1.04-5.39; rs2042996: HR = 2.28; 95% CI 1.19-4.37, recessive model). According to the experimental ENCODE data all these SNPs themselves or SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with them (r (2) ae<yen> 0.80) were located in regulatory regions. RUNX1 and TTN showed also several signatures of positive selection. Conclusion The study gave evidence that germline variants in BC driver genes may have impact on BC risk and/or survival. Future studies could discover further germline variants in known or so far unknown driver genes which contribute to cancer development.

  • 36. Göhler, Stella
    et al.
    Da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Cancer Center Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Impact of functional germline variants and a deletion polymorphism in APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B on breast cancer risk and survival in a Swedish study population2016In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 142, no 1, p. 273-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The C -> T mutation signature caused by APOBEC family members contributes to the development of breast cancer (BC). Also overexpression of APOBEC3B and a similar to 29. 5-kb deletion polymorphism between APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B have been associated with increased BC risk. Methods: We investigated in a population-based study, with 782 Swedish BC cases and 1559 controls, associations between potentially functional germline variants in APOBEC3A or APOBEC3B gene and BC risk and survival. Additionally, we identified deletion polymorphism carriers and explored possible associations with BC. Results: No evidence of association between any germline variant, including the deletion polymorphism, and BC risk or survival was observed. Only APOBEC3A promoter polymorphism rs5757402 was associated with low stage (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI 0.50-0.96, dominant model). Conclusion: The reported association between the deletion polymorphism and BC risk was not confirmed in the Swedish population, nor did any genotyped germline variant show any association with BC risk or survival.

  • 37. Haiman, Christopher A
    et al.
    Dossus, Laure
    Setiawan, V Wendy
    Stram, Daniel O
    Dunning, Alison M
    Thomas, Gilles
    Thun, Michael J
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Altshuler, David
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buring, Julie
    Burtt, Noël
    Calle, Eugenia E
    Chanock, Stephen
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Colditz, Graham A
    Cox, David G
    Feigelson, Heather Spencer
    Hankinson, Susan E
    Hayes, Richard B
    Henderson, Brian E
    Hirschhorn, Joel N
    Hoover, Robert
    Hunter, David J
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kolonel, Laurence N
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Panico, Salvatore
    Peeters, Petra H
    Pike, Malcolm C
    Riboli, Elio
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Travis, Ruth
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Wacholder, Sholom
    Ziegler, Regina G
    Genetic variation at the CYP19A1 locus predicts circulating estrogen levels but not breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women.2007In: Cancer Res, ISSN 0008-5472, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 1893-1897Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Harlid, Sophia
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Laboratory Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Malin I. L.
    Butt, Salma
    Grzybowska, Eva
    Eyfjord, Jorunn E.
    Lenner, Per
    Forsti, Asta
    Hemminki, Kari
    Manjer, Jonas
    Dillner, Joakim
    Carlson, Joyce
    Combined effect of low-penetrant SNPs on breast cancer risk2012In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although many low-penetrant genetic risk factors for breast cancer have been discovered, knowledge about the effect of multiple risk alleles is limited, especially in women <50 years. We therefore investigated the association between multiple risk alleles and breast cancer risk as well as individual effects according to age-approximated pre- and post-menopausal status.

    METHODS: Ten previously described breast cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analysed in a joint European biobank-based study comprising 3584 breast cancer cases and 5063 cancer-free controls. Genotyping was performed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression.

    RESULTS: Significant associations with breast cancer were confirmed for 7 of the 10 SNPs. Analysis of the joint effect of the original 10 as well as the statistically significant 7 SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, rs889312, rs13387042, rs13281615, rs3817198 and rs981782) found a highly significant trend for increasing breast cancer risk with increasing number of risk alleles (P-trend 5.6 x 10(-20) and 1.5 x 10(-25), respectively). Odds ratio for breast cancer of 1.84 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.59-2.14; 10 SNPs) and 2.12 (95% CI: 1.80-2.50; 7 SNPs) was seen for the maximum vs the minimum number of risk alleles. Additionally, one of the examined SNPs (rs981782 in HCN1) had a protective effect that was significantly stronger in premenopausal women (P-value: 7.9 x 10(-4)).

    CONCLUSION: The strongly increasing risk seen when combining many low-penetrant risk alleles supports the polygenic inheritance model of breast cancer. British Journal of Cancer (2012) 106, 389-396. doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.461 www.bjcancer.com Published online 1 November 2011 (C) 2012 Cancer Research UK

  • 39.
    Harlid, Sophia
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Laboratory Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Malin I L
    Butt, Salma
    Hussain, Shehnaz
    Grzybowska, Ewa
    Eyfjörd, Jorunn Erla
    Lenner, Per
    Försti, Asta
    Hemminki, Kari
    Manjer, Jonas
    Dillner, Joakim
    Carlson, Joyce
    A candidate CpG SNP approach identifies a breast cancer associated ESR1-SNP2011In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 129, no 7, p. 1689-1698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altered DNA methylation is often seen in malignant cells, potentially contributing to carcinogenesis by suppressing gene expression. We hypothesized that heritable methylation potential might be a risk factor for breast cancer and evaluated possible association with breast cancer for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) either involving CpG sequences in extended 5'-regulatory regions of candidate genes (ESR1, ESR2, PGR, and SHBG) or CpG and missense coding SNPs in genes involved in methylation (MBD1, MECP2, DNMT1, MGMT, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, MTHFD1, MTHFD2, BHMT, DCTD, and SLC19A1). Genome-wide searches for genetic risk factors for breast cancers have in general not investigated these SNPs, because of low minor allele frequency or weak haplotype associations. Genotyping was performed using Mass spectrometry-Maldi-Tof in a screening panel of 538 cases and 1,067 controls. Potential association to breast cancer was identified for 15 SNPs and one of these SNPs (rs7766585 in ESR1) was found to associate strongly with breast cancer, OR 1.30 (95% CI 1.17-1.45; p-value 2.1 × 10(-6) ), when tested in a verification panel consisting of 3,211 unique breast cancer cases and 4,223 unique controls from five European biobank cohorts. In conclusion, a candidate gene search strategy focusing on methylation-related SNPs did identify a SNP that associated with breast cancer at high significance.

  • 40. Hemminki, Kari
    et al.
    Ji, Jianguang
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Concordance of survival in family members with prostate cancer2008In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1705-1709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Several earlier studies have assessed survival in prostate cancer based on familial risk of this disease. As a novel concept, we posit that factors governing survival in prostate cancer are likely to be different from those governing risk of prostate cancer. To prove this, we searched for familial clustering of survival (ie, concordance of survival among family members).

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard rates (HRs) for cause-specific and overall survival in invasive prostate cancer. HRs show the probability of death in the study group compared with the reference group. The study covered 610 sons of affected fathers with median follow-up times for survival ranging from 34 to 76 months.

    RESULTS: When the survival in sons was analyzed according to the fathers' length of survival, there was a concordance of prognosis; the HR was 0.62 for sons whose fathers had survived longer than 59 months, compared with sons whose fathers had survived fewer than 24 months (P for trend, .02). On a continuous scale, the sons' survival increased almost linearly with the fathers' survival time. When the analysis was reversed and HRs were derived for fathers, the concordance of good and poor survival remained.

    CONCLUSION: The results are consistent in showing that both good and poor survival in prostate cancer aggregate in families. Genetic factors are likely to contribute to the results, which provide the first challenging population-level evidence on heritability in prognosis of prostate cancer.

  • 41. Hemminki, Kari
    et al.
    Ji, Jianguang
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Survival in breast cancer is familial.2008In: Breast Cancer Res Treat, ISSN 0167-6806, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several earlier studies have assessed survival in breast cancer based on familial risk of this disease. The results have been conflicting and suggest that the risk and prognostic factors of cancer are largely distinct. As a novel concept, we searched for familial clustering of survival, i.e., concordance of survival among family members. We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for cause-specific and overall survival in invasive breast cancer. HR shows the probability of death in the study group compared the reference group. The study covered 1277 mother-daughter pairs with familial breast cancer. Their median follow-up times for survival ranged from 96 to 122 months. When the survival in daughters was analyzed according to the mothers' length of survival, there was a concordance of prognosis. The HR was 0.65 in daughters whose mothers had survived > or = 120 months compared to daughters whose mothers had survived less than 36 months (P-value for trend 0.02). When the analysis was reversed and HRs were derived for mothers, the results were essentially similar (P-value for trend 0.02). The survival did not differ between patients with familial or sporadic breast cancer. The results are consistent in showing that both good and poor survival in breast cancer aggregates in families, which is a novel population-level finding for any cancer. The consistency of the results suggests that the prognosis in breast cancer is in part heritable which is likely to be explained by yet unknown genetic mechanisms.

  • 42. Hemminki, Kari
    et al.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundquist, Jan
    Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo
    Risk of subsequent solid tumors after non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: effect of diagnostic age and time since diagnosis.2008In: J Clin Oncol, ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1850-1857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Quantitative data on subsequent cancers after primary cancers provide information on treatment-related risks on second cancers, with implications for therapeutic adverse effects and human susceptibility in general. Quantitative data on solid tumors are limited. We focus on survivors of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) because the disease is diagnosed at a wide range of ages and treated uniformly primarily with chemotherapy.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS:

    The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database included 11.5 million individuals whose cancers were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent neoplasms among 28,131 patients with NHL.

    RESULTS:

    The SIR for solid tumors after NHL was 1.65 (2,290 patients) and that for lymphohematopoietic neoplasms was 5.36 (369 patients). Among the 25 most common solid tumors, the SIRs were increased for all but nine sites; the highest SIR (40.8) was observed for spinal meningioma. The SIRs for solid tumors declined in an age-dependent manner from 4.52 in diagnostic age younger than 20 years to 1.12 in diagnostic age 70+ years. In the most common patient groups, the SIRs for solid tumors increased up to 30 years after NHL diagnosis. Because of the high incidence of solid tumors in these age groups, they contributed the largest numbers of therapy-related cases.

    CONCLUSION:

    These data indicate that age at treatment determines both the magnitude of the initial relative risk and the time-dependent modulation of the response. Therapy-related damage persists at least 30 years and its toll of solid tumors is largest 21 to 30 years after diagnosis.

  • 43. Huesing, Anika
    et al.
    Canzian, Federico
    Beckmann, Lars
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Diver, W. Ryan
    Thun, Michael J.
    Berg, Christine D.
    Hoover, Robert N.
    Ziegler, Regina G.
    Figueroa, Jonine D.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Olsen, Anja
    Viallon, Vivian
    Boeing, Heiner
    Masala, Giovanna
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Stram, Daniel O.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    McCarty, Catherine A.
    Buring, Julie E.
    Lee, I-Min
    Zhang, Shumin
    Lindstroem, Sara
    Hankinson, Susan E.
    Riboli, Elio
    Hunter, David J.
    Henderson, Brian E.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Kraft, Peter
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Prediction of breast cancer risk by genetic risk factors, overall and by hormone receptor status2012In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective There is increasing interest in adding common genetic variants identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) to breast cancer risk prediction models. First results from such models showed modest benefits in terms of risk discrimination. Heterogeneity of breast cancer as defined by hormone-receptor status has not been considered in this context. In this study we investigated the predictive capacity of 32 GWAS-detected common variants for breast cancer risk, alone and in combination with classical risk factors, and for tumours with different hormone receptor status. Material and methods Within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, we analysed 6009 invasive breast cancer cases and 7827 matched controls of European ancestry, with data on classical breast cancer risk factors and 32 common gene variants identified through GWAS. Discriminatory ability with respect to breast cancer of specific hormone receptor-status was assessed with the age adjusted and cohort-adjusted concordance statistic (AUROC(a)). Absolute risk scores were calculated with external reference data. Integrated discrimination improvement was used to measure improvements in risk prediction. Results We found a small but steady increase in discriminatory ability with increasing numbers of genetic variants included in the model (difference in AUROC(a) going from 2.7% to 4%). Discriminatory ability for all models varied strongly by hormone receptor status. Discussion and conclusions Adding information on common polymorphisms provides small but statistically significant improvements in the quality of breast cancer risk prediction models. We consistently observed better performance for receptor-positive cases, but the gain in discriminatory quality is not sufficient for clinical application.

  • 44. Hussain, S. K.
    et al.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundquist, J.
    Hemminki, K.
    Influence of education level on cancer survival in Sweden2008In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While cancer survival at several sites has historically been shown to vary by education level, a current comprehensive assessment of survival following a cancer diagnosis in Sweden, a country with universal health care and cancer screening, has yet to be carried out.

    METHODS:

    Using the 2006 update of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database and Cox's proportional hazards regression methods, we calculate the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval to estimate the influence of education level on site-specific cancer survival.

    RESULTS:

    Significant positive associations between education level and cancer survival were observed following a diagnosis of upper aerodigestive track cancer, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, kidney cancer, urinary bladder cancer, melanoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, and testicular cancer. Although the HRs differed between cancer sites, compared with women and men completing <9 years of education, university graduates were associated with a significant 40% improved survival for all cancer sites combined.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Survival differences by education level were observed for both indolent and aggressive malignancies.

  • 45. Ji, Jianguang
    et al.
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Survival in bladder and renal cell cancers is familial.2008In: J Am Soc Nephrol, ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 985-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having family members with cancer has been associated with increased risk for bladder and renal cell cancers, but its association with survival has not been examined. This study was an analysis of the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and revealed that survival for bladder and renal cell cancers was similar whether the cancer was familial or sporadic; however, when survival in offspring was analyzed according to the affected parents' length of survival, prognosis was concordant. Cox proportional hazard regression models revealed that for bladder cancer, the risk for death among offspring whose parents survived > or =5 yr was approximately one third that of offspring whose parents survived <5 yr, after adjustment for gender, age at diagnosis, time period of diagnosis, socioeconomic status, and geographic region (adjusted hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.80, for overall mortality). A risk of similar magnitude was found for renal cell cancer (adjusted hazard ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.87, for overall mortality). These population-level findings suggest heritability of prognosis for bladder and renal cell cancers. Genetic factors likely contribute to the mechanism underlying this observation.

  • 46. Ji, Jianguang
    et al.
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Survival in Familial Pancreatic Cancer.2008In: Pancreatology, ISSN 1424-3911, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 252-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Family history has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, its possible influence on pancreatic cancer survival has rarely been studied, probably because of the rareness of cases in the same family.

    METHODS:

    We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to examine the survival differences between familial and sporadic pancreatic cancers. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cause-specific and overall survival in pancreatic cancer were examined. HRs show the probability of death in the study group compared to the reference group.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 75 familial pancreatic cancers were noted. HRs were significantly higher among offspring with an affected parent compared to those without an affected parent; for cause-specific and overall survival, the HRs were 1.44 and 1.37, respectively. Reversing the analysis and deriving HRs for parents (offspring as probands) showed that familial pancreatic cancer had a worse prognosis than sporadic cases (HR 1.37 for cause-specific and 1.28 for overall survival). The HRs were close to unity among spouses with concordant pancreatic cancer.

    CONCLUSION:

    The data show that survival in familial pancreatic cancer is worse than that in sporadic disease, which could be explained by genetic factors, if other confounding factors can be excluded. and IAP.

  • 47. Ji, Jianguang
    et al.
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Survival in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by histology and family history.2009In: Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology, ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 135, no 12, p. 1711-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Although survival has been studied for various subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), there have been few comprehensive studies to quantify the prognosis, including all specific histologies. The effect of family history on survival in NHL has not been examined. METHODS: We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios in NHL by histology and family history. RESULTS: Using diffuse centroblastic lymphoma as reference (HR 1.0), patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and hairy-cell leukemia had the best survival. Survival advantage was also noted among patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and different kinds of follicular lymphomas. For T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides showed a favorable prognosis. As for survival by family history, a total of 98 familial cases were noted in our Database with a similar prognosis compared to sporadic cases in both parental and offspring generations. A non-significant familial concordance of either good or poor survival was noted among family members when probands' prognosis was stratified by survival time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide quantitative prognosis data for patients with NHL according to specific histologies. Patients with a familial NHL had a similar prognosis compared to patients with sporadic disease. The data suggest familial concordance in either good or poor survival among family members.

  • 48. Ji, Jianguang
    et al.
    Försti, Asta
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Survival in ovarian cancer patients by histology and family history.2008In: Acta Oncol, ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1133-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Earlier studies suggest that histology has no prognostic significance in patients with invasive ovarian tumors. Studies about the effect of family history on survival have given conflicting results, which we try to clarify in this study. As an additional question, we examined whether family members share survival experience.

    METHODS:

    We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for cause-specific and overall survival in ovarian cancer patients by histology and family history. HRs show the probability of death in the study group compared to the reference group.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 6,049 ovarian cancer patients with specific histologies were retrieved from our Database from years 1993 to 1999. Compared to women with epithelial ovarian cancer, women with borderline epithelial tumors had the best survival (HR 0.02 and 0.14 for cause-specific and overall survival). Good survival was also noted for patients with sex cord-stromal tumors and germ cell tumors. Among specific subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancers, good survival was noted for women with clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. The study covered 80 mother-daughter pairs with a family history. Patients with a family history had a poorer survival than sporadic cases in both maternal and offspring generations. When the survival was analyzed according to the probands' length of survival, there was a non-significant concordance of prognosis.

    CONCLUSION:

    Our data showed that histology and family history are prognostic factors for ovarian tumors. Patients with a family history had a more aggressive course than the sporadic cases.

  • 49. Jin, Qianren
    et al.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grzybowska, Ewa
    Klaes, Rüdinger
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Chen, Bowang
    Pamula, Jolanta
    Pekala, Wioletta
    Zientek, Helena
    Rogozinska-Szczepka, Jadwiga
    Utracka-Hutka, Beata
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Försti, Asta
    Vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms in relation to breast cancer development and prognosis2005In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 3647-3653Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bordás, Pál
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wallin, Hans
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Service screening with mammography in Northern Sweden: effects on breast cancer mortality - an update.2007In: Journal of Medical Screening, ISSN 0969-1413, E-ISSN 1475-5793, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effectiveness of service screening with mammography in Northern Sweden.

    SETTING: Two counties which invited women aged 40-74 years to service screening with mammography were compared with two counties where service screening started 5-7 years later. There were 109,000 and 77,000 women in the study and control counties, respectively.

    METHODS: Cohorts in the study group were defined to include only breast cancer cases diagnosed after their first invitation to screening. Two outcome measures for breast cancer mortality were used; excess mortality and underlying cause of death (UCD). Detection mode was used to estimate the efficacy of screening for those women who actually attended screening. The cohorts were followed for 11 years.

    RESULTS: The relative rate (RR) of breast cancer death as excess mortality and UCD for women aged 40-74 years invited to screening, compared with women not yet invited, was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.87) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.62-0.88), respectively. The largest effect was seen in women aged 40-49 years (RR = 0.64 and RR = 0.62 for excess mortality and UCD, respectively). RR in age 40-74 years for women actually screened was 0.65 (95% CI 0.51-0.84) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.57-0.86) for excess mortality and UCD, respectively. The number of women needed to screen to save one life was 912 after 11 years of follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms previous findings in the earlier follow-up and indicates a long-term reduction of breast cancer mortality by 26-30%. The efficacy among those who actually attended screening was about 5% larger.

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