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  • 1.
    Hjelte, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Department of support and development, Umeå Municipality.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Westerberg, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hyvönen, Ulf
    From thought to action: young parents' reasons for participation in parenting support groups at child welfare centers2015In: Social Work in Public Health, ISSN 1937-1918, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 516-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the focus is on young parents' engagement process in relation to participation in parenting support groups carried out at child welfare centers. This qualitative study focuses not only on young parents' reasons for participating or not participating in parenting support groups during different phases in their engagement process, but also on examining the circumstances that may contribute to such changes. The results show that these reasons can be divided into four categories: the staff, other participants, the social network, and practical circumstances. It also appears that these reasons change between different phases of their engagement process. Primarily three different circumstances contributed to variation in parents' reasons: difficulty in predicting the value of participation, increased closeness in relationships with staff and other parents, and the specific life phase in which young parents find themselves. The results have important implications for policy makers and practitioners in their work in formulating and updating parenting support; they also indicate what may be important to focus on in the recruitment of young parents, and also what may be crucial in regard to them completing their engagement in parent support groups.

  • 2.
    Silfver, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Maritha, Jacobsson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Härgestam, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Widding, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics2018In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how Swedish grade three children are discursively positioned as pupils when they are taking national tests in mathematics and when they reflect on the testing situation afterwards. With support from theories about affective-discursive assemblages, we explore children's body language, emotions, and talk in light of the two overarching discourses that we believe frame the classroom: the 'testing discourse' and the 'development discourse'. Through the disciplinary power of these main discourses children struggle to conduct themselves in order to become recognized as intelligible subjects and 'ideal pupils'. The analysis, when taking into account how affects and discourses intertwine, shows that children can be in 'untroubled', 'troubled', or ambivalent subject positions.

  • 3.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Youthful mothering?: Exploring the meaning of adulthood and youthfulness within the maternal identity work of young Swedish mothers2018In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 355-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore meanings of adulthood and youthfulness in relation to notions of life course, good motherhood, and girlhood among young mothers in Sweden. Our analysis was informed by a discursive psychological approach and was based on interview conversations with 17 mothers who were 13–25 years old at the birth of their first child. In our analysis, we identified two repertoires – the ‘social age’ repertoire and the ‘chronological age’ repertoire. The interviewees invoked the two repertoires to position themselves and others as either responsible adult mothers or as responsible youthful mothers. Meanings of adulthood are central within the idea of motherhood, and by deviating from their expected life course young mothers are often understood as non-adults who are incapable of fulfilling the developmental task of motherhood. Our work suggests that the maternal identity work of young mothers takes place within discourses of both adulthood and youthfulness.

  • 4.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Who is the mother? Exploring the meaning of grandparental support in young Swedish mothers’ narratives2017In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 318-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the western understanding of a nuclear family and the idea of good motherhood, the need for grandparental support is commonly viewed as an expression of deficient motherhood. Young mothers are often seen as incapable of maternal practices and as being in need of support from their extended family. An alternative view is that too much support might result in the grandmothers taking on the role of mother. This paper explores research around the ambivalent meanings of grandparental support in young Swedish mothers’ narratives. In this research, we identified three repertoires: inhibiting, being-there-no-matter-what and responsibility. Mothers who were following their expected life course achieved a subject position as a ‘‘real mother’’ within a functioning nuclear family. Mothers deviating from their expected life course achieved a subject position as either a ‘‘mother in becoming’’ with a functional and supportive extended family or as a ‘‘real mother’’ with a dysfunctional and non-supportive extended family. In the case of young mothers who are seen as insufficient, motherhood might become negotiable and fluid between the biological mother and the young mother’s own mother.

  • 5.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Challenging the roles of “skilled” professionals and “risky” young mothers: peer support, expertise, and relational patterns in Facebook groups2017In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 247-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many countries spend a great deal of money and effort on programs for expert-guided parenting support to be carried out in face-to-face groups. One goal of such support is to target, help, and educate “risky” groups of parents, such as young parents. It is striking, however, that young parents have a conspicuously low degree of participation in this type of parenting support. Drawing on the assumption that many young parents go online to seek, give, and receive peer parenting support, this paper presents a case study of activities within three Facebook groups. Using a combination of social network analysis, online ethnography, and interviews, we analyze how social network relationships and discussions differ depending on whether the analyzed Facebook group in question is administrated by professionals or peers, what the role of professional experts is, and how young parents might use social media to take control of their own support needs. Our results indicate that some of the affordances provided by Facebook might contribute to a challenging of the roles of “skilled” professionals versus “risky” young parents.

1 - 5 of 5
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