umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Becker, Nina
    et al.
    Kalpouzos, Grégoria
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laukka, Erika J.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Structure-function associations of successful associative encoding2019In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 201, article id 116020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated a critical role of hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in associative memory. Similarly, evidence from structural MRI studies suggests a relationship between gray-matter volume in these regions and associative memory. However, how brain volume and activity relate to each other during associative-memory formation remains unclear. Here, we used joint independent component analysis (jICA) to examine how gray-matter volume and brain activity would be associated during associative encoding, especially in medial-temporal lobe (MTL) and IFG. T1-weighted images were collected from 27 young adults, and functional MRI was employed during intentional encoding of object pairs. A subsequent recognition task tested participants' memory performance. Unimodal analyses using voxel-based morphometry revealed that participants with better associative memory showed larger gray-matter volume in left anterior hippocampus. Results from the jICA revealed one component that comprised a covariance pattern between gray-matter volume in anterior and posterior MTL and encoding-related activity in IFG. Our findings suggest that gray matter within the MTL modulates distally distinct parts of the associative encoding circuit, and extend previous studies that demonstrated MTL-IFG functional connectivity during associative memory tasks.

  • 2.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Physical activity over a decade modifies age-related decline in perfusion, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity of the posterior default mode network: a multimodal approach2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 131, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One step toward healthy brain aging may be to entertain a physically active lifestyle. Studies investigating physical activity effects on brain integrity have, however, mainly been based on single brain markers, and few used a multimodal imaging approach. In the present study, we used cohort data from the Betula study to examine the relationships between scores reflecting current and accumulated physical activity and brain health. More specifically, we first examined if physical activity scores modulated negative effects of age on seven resting state networks previously identified by Salami, Pudas, and Nyberg (2014). The results revealed that one of the most age-sensitive RSN was positively altered by physical activity, namely, the posterior default-mode network involving the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Second, within this physical activity-sensitive RSN, we further analyzed the association between physical activity and gray matter (GM) volumes, white matter integrity, and cerebral perfusion using linear regression models. Regions within the identified DMN displayed larger GM volumes and stronger perfusion in relation to both current and 10-years accumulated scores of physical activity. No associations of physical activity and white matter integrity were observed. Collectively, our findings demonstrate strengthened PCC–cortical connectivity within the DMN, larger PCC GM volume, and higher PCC perfusion as a function of physical activity. In turn, these findings may provide insights into the mechanisms of how long-term regular exercise can contribute to healthy brain aging.

  • 3. Giddaluru, Sudheer
    et al.
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 11330 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westlye, Lars T
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Cichon, Sven
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Steen, Vidar M
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Nilsson, Lars Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). ARC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Le Hellard, Stéphanie
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Genetics of structural connectivity and information processing in the brain2016In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 221, no 9, p. 4643-4661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the genetic factors underlying brain structural connectivity is a major challenge in imaging genetics. Here, we present results from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of whole-brain white matter (WM) fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of microstructural coherence measured using diffusion tensor imaging. Data from independent GWASs of 355 Swedish and 250 Norwegian healthy adults were integrated by meta-analysis to enhance power. Complementary GWASs on behavioral data reflecting processing speed, which is related to microstructural properties of WM pathways, were performed and integrated with WM FA results via multimodal analysis to identify shared genetic associations. One locus on chromosome 17 (rs145994492) showed genome-wide significant association with WM FA (meta P value = 1.87 × 10(-08)). Suggestive associations (Meta P value <1 × 10(-06)) were observed for 12 loci, including one containing ZFPM2 (lowest meta P value = 7.44 × 10(-08)). This locus was also implicated in multimodal analysis of WM FA and processing speed (lowest Fisher P value = 8.56 × 10(-07)). ZFPM2 is relevant in specification of corticothalamic neurons during brain development. Analysis of SNPs associated with processing speed revealed association with a locus that included SSPO (lowest meta P value = 4.37 × 10(-08)), which has been linked to commissural axon growth. An intergenic SNP (rs183854424) 14 kb downstream of CSMD1, which is implicated in schizophrenia, showed suggestive evidence of association in the WM FA meta-analysis (meta P value = 1.43 × 10(-07)) and the multimodal analysis (Fisher P value = 1 × 10(-07)). These findings provide novel data on the genetics of WM pathways and processing speed, and highlight a role of ZFPM2 and CSMD1 in information processing in the brain.

  • 4.
    Gorbach, Tetiana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    A Hierarchical Bayesian Mixture Modeling Approach for Analysis of Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity: An Alternative to ThresholdingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gorbach, Tetiana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bayesian mixture modeling for longitudinal fMRI connectivity studies with dropoutManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Gorbach, Tetiana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Pudas, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Longitudinal association between hippocampus atrophy and episodic-memory decline2017In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 51, p. 167-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is marked variability in both onset and rate of episodic-memory decline in aging. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed that the extent of age-related brain changes varies markedly across individuals. Past studies of whether regional atrophy accounts for episodic-memory decline in aging have yielded inconclusive findings. Here we related 15-year changes in episodic memory to 4-year changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter volume and in white-matter connectivity and lesions. In addition, changes in word fluency, fluid IQ (Block Design), and processing speed were estimated and related to structural brain changes. Significant negative change over time was observed for all cognitive and brain measures. A robust brain-cognition change-change association was observed for episodic-memory decline and atrophy in the hippocampus. This association was significant for older (65-80 years) but not middle-aged (55-60 years) participants and not sensitive to the assumption of ignorable attrition. Thus, these longitudinal findings highlight medial-temporal lobe system integrity as particularly crucial for maintaining episodic-memory functioning in older age. 

  • 7. Guitart-Masip, Marc
    et al.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Garrett, Douglas
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Bäckman, Lars
    BOLD Variability is Related to Dopaminergic Neurotransmission and Cognitive Aging2016In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 2074-2083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dopamine (DA) losses are associated with various aging-related cognitive deficits. Typically, higher moment-to-moment brain signal variability in large-scale patterns of voxels in neocortical regions is linked to better cognitive performance and younger adult age, yet the physiological mechanisms regulating brain signal variability are unknown. We explored the relationship among adult age, DA availability, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability, while younger and older participants performed a spatial working memory (SWM) task. We quantified striatal and extrastriatal DA D1 receptor density with [(11)C]SCH23390 and positron emission tomography in all participants. We found that BOLD variability in a neocortical region was negatively related to age and positively related to SWM performance. In contrast, BOLD variability in subcortical regions and bilateral hippocampus was positively related to age and slower responses, and negatively related to D1 density in caudate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, BOLD variability in neocortical regions was positively associated with task-related disengagement of the default-mode network, a network whose activation needs to be suppressed for efficient SWM processing. Our results show that age-related DA losses contribute to changes in brain signal variability in subcortical regions and suggest a potential mechanism, by which neocortical BOLD variability supports cognitive performance.

  • 8. Hibar, Derrek P.
    et al.
    Stein, Jason L.
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro
    Desrivieres, Sylvane
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Toro, Roberto
    Wittfeld, Katharina
    Abramovic, Lucija
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Aribisala, Benjamin S.
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Bernard, Manon
    Bohlken, Marc M.
    Boks, Marco P.
    Bralten, Janita
    Brown, Andrew A.
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Chen, Qiang
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel
    den Braber, Anouk
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Goldman, Aaron L.
    Grimm, Oliver
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Hass, Johanna
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Hoogman, Martine
    Janowitz, Deborah
    Jia, Tianye
    Kim, Sungeun
    Klein, Marieke
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Lee, Phil H.
    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde
    Luciano, Michelle
    Macare, Christine
    Mather, Karen A.
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Rose, Emma J.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Shin, Jean
    Strike, Lachlan T.
    Teumer, Alexander
    van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.
    van Eijk, Kristel R.
    Walters, Raymond K.
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Alhusaini, Saud
    Athanasiu, Lavinia
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Hakobjan, Marina M. H.
    Hartberg, Cecilie B.
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.
    Hoehn, David
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    Liewald, David C. M.
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Makkinje, Remco R. R.
    Matarin, Mar
    Naber, Marlies A. M.
    McKay, D. Reese
    Needham, Margaret
    Nugent, Allison C.
    Puetz, Benno
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Shen, Li
    Sprooten, Emma
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    van der Marel, Saskia S. L.
    van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.
    Walton, Esther
    Wolf, Christiane
    Almasy, Laura
    Ames, David
    Arepalli, Sampath
    Assareh, Amelia A.
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Brodaty, Henry
    Bulayeva, Kazima B.
    Carless, Melanie A.
    Cichon, Sven
    Corvin, Aiden
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Czisch, Michael
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Dillman, Allissa
    Duggirala, Ravi
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Erk, Susanne
    Fedko, Iryna O.
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Foroud, Tatiana M.
    Fox, Peter T.
    Fukunaga, Masaki
    Gibbs, J. Raphael
    Goering, Harald H. H.
    Green, Robert C.
    Guelfi, Sebastian
    Hansell, Narelle K.
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Heinz, Andreas
    Hernandez, Dena G.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Holsboer, Florian
    Homuth, Georg
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Ikeda, Masashi
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Jenkinson, Mark
    Johnson, Robert
    Kanai, Ryota
    Keil, Maria
    Kent, Jack W., Jr.
    Kochunov, Peter
    Kwok, John B.
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Liu, Xinmin
    Longo, Dan L.
    McMahon, Katie L.
    Meisenzah, Eva
    Melle, Ingrid
    Mahnke, Sebastian
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Mostert, Jeanette C.
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Nalls, Michael A.
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Nilsson, Lars G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Noethen, Markus M.
    Ohi, Kazutaka
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Perez-Iglesias, Rocio
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Reppermund, Simone
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Rosen, Glenn D.
    Rujescu, Dan
    Schnell, Knut
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Smith, Colin
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Sussmann, Jessika E.
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Traynor, Bryan J.
    Troncoso, Juan
    Turner, Jessica A.
    Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.
    van't Ent, Dennis
    van der Brug, Marcel
    van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    van Tol, Marie-Jose
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Wassink, Thomas H.
    Westman, Eric
    Zielke, Ronald H.
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    Ashbrook, David G.
    Hager, Reinmar
    Lu, Lu
    McMahon, Francis J.
    Morris, Derek W.
    Williams, Robert W.
    Brunner, Han G.
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Buitelaar, Jan K.
    Cahn, Wiepke
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Dale, Anders M.
    Davies, Gareth E.
    Delanty, Norman
    Depondt, Chantal
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Hoffman, Wolfgang
    Hosten, Norbert
    Kahn, Rene S.
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Nauck, Matthias
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    van Bokhoven, Hans
    van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    Voelzke, Henry
    Walter, Henrik
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Wen, Wei
    White, Tonya
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Blangero, John
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    Cannon, Dara M.
    Cookson, Mark R.
    de Geus, Eco J. C.
    Deary, Ian J.
    Donohoe, Gary
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Francks, Clyde
    Glahn, David C.
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Gruber, Oliver
    Hardy, John
    Hashimoto, Ryota
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    Joensson, Erik G.
    Kloszewska, Iwona
    Lovestone, Simon
    Mattay, Venkata S.
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    McDonald, Colm
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    Paus, Tomas
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Ryten, Mina
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Simmons, Andy
    Singleton, Andrew
    Soininen, Hilkka
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Weale, Michael E.
    Weinberger, Daniel R.
    Adams, Hieab H. H.
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Seiler, Stephan
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Chauhan, Ganesh
    Satizabal, Claudia L.
    Becker, James T.
    Yanek, Lisa
    van der Lee, Sven J.
    Ebling, Maritza
    Fischl, Bruce
    Longstreth, W. T., Jr.
    Greve, Douglas
    Schmidt, Helena
    Nyquist, Paul
    Vinke, Louis N.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Xue, Luting
    Mazoyer, Bernard
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Seshadri, Sudha
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Schumann, Gunter
    Franke, Barbara
    Thompson, Paul M., Jr.
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 520, no 7546, p. 224-U216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume(5) and intracranial volume(6). These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 X 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  • 9.
    Kaboodvand, Neda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The retrosplenial cortex: a memory gateway between the cortical default mode network and the medial temporal lobe2018In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 2020-2034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The default mode network (DMN) involves interacting cortical areas, including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), and subcortical areas, including the medial temporal lobe (MTL). The degree of functional connectivity (FC) within the DMN, particularly between MTL and medial-parietal subsystems, relates to episodic memory (EM) processes. However, past resting-state studies investigating the link between posterior DMN-MTL FC and EM performance yielded inconsistent results, possibly reflecting heterogeneity in the degree of connectivity between MTL and specific cortical DMN regions. Animal work suggests that RSC has structural connections to both cortical DMN regions and MTL, and may thus serve as an intermediate layer that facilitates information transfer between cortical and subcortical DMNs. We studied 180 healthy old adults (aged 64-68 years), who underwent comprehensive assessment of EM, along with resting-state fMRI. We found greater FC between MTL and RSC than between MTL and the other cortical DMN regions (e.g., PCC), with the only significant association with EM observed for MTL-RSC FC. Mediational analysis showed that MTL-cortical DMN connectivity increased with RSC as a mediator. Further analysis using a graph-theoretical approach on DMN nodes revealed the highest betweenness centrality for RSC, confirming that a high proportion of short paths among DMN regions pass through RSC. Importantly, the degree of RSC mediation was associated with EM performance, suggesting that individuals with greater mediation have an EM advantage. These findings suggest that RSC forms a critical gateway between MTL and cortical DMN to support EM in older adults.

  • 10. Kalpouzos, Gregoria
    et al.
    Garzon, Benjamin
    Sitnikov, Rouslan
    Heiland, Carmel
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Persson, Jonas
    Backman, Lars
    Higher Striatal Iron Concentration is Linked to Frontostriatal Underactivation and Poorer Memory in Normal Aging2017In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 3427-3436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the brain, intracellular iron is essential for cellular metabolism. However, an overload of free iron is toxic, inducing oxidative stress and cell death. Although an increase of striatal iron has been related to atrophy and impaired cognitive performance, the link between elevated iron and altered brain activity in aging remains unexplored. In a sample of 37 younger and older adults, we examined whether higher striatal iron concentration could underlie age-related differences in frontostriatal activity induced by mental imagery of motor and non-motor scenes, and poorer recall of the scenes. Higher striatal iron concentration was linked to underrecruitment of frontostriatal regions regardless of age and striatal volume, the iron-activity association in right putamen being primarily driven by the older adults. In older age, higher striatal iron was related to poorer memory. Altered astrocytic functions could account for the link between brain iron and brain activity, as astrocytes are involved in iron buffering, neurovascular coupling, and synaptic activity. Our preliminary findings, which need to be replicated in a larger sample, suggest a potential frontostriatal target for intervention to counteract negative effects of iron accumulation on brain function and cognition.

  • 11.
    Karalija, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Ek, Jesper
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Papenberg, Goran
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A,S-17165, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brandmaier, Andreas M.
    Köhncke, Ylva
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Lövdén, Martin
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Bäckman, Lars
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Cardiovascular factors are related to dopamine integrity and cognition in aging2019In: Annals of clinical and translational neurology, E-ISSN 2328-9503, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 2291-2303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aging brain undergoes several changes, including reduced vascular, structural, and dopamine (DA) system integrity. Such brain changes have been associated with age‐related cognitive deficits. However, their relative importance, interrelations, and links to risk factors remain elusive.

    Methods: The present work used magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 11C‐raclopride to jointly examine vascular parameters (white‐matter lesions and perfusion), DA D2‐receptor availability, brain structure, and cognitive performance in healthy older adults (n = 181, age: 64–68 years) from the Cognition, Brain, and Aging (COBRA) study.

    Results: Covariance was found among several brain indicators, where top predictors of cognitive performance included caudate and hippocampal integrity (D2DR availability and volumes), and cortical blood flow and regional volumes. White‐matter lesion burden was negatively correlated with caudate DA D2‐receptor availability and white‐matter microstructure. Compared to individuals with smaller lesions, individuals with confluent lesions (exceeding 20 mm in diameter) had reductions in cortical and hippocampal perfusion, striatal and hippocampal D2‐receptor availability, white‐matter microstructure, and reduced performance on tests of episodic memory, sequence learning, and processing speed. Higher cardiovascular risk as assessed by treatment for hypertension, systolic blood pressure, overweight, and smoking was associated with lower frontal cortical perfusion, lower putaminal D2DR availability, smaller grey‐matter volumes, a larger number of white‐matter lesions, and lower episodic memory performance.

    Interpretation: Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced cardiovascular health is associated with poorer status for brain variables that are central to age‐sensitive cognitive functions, with emphasis on DA integrity.

  • 12.
    Mansson, Kristoffer N.
    et al.
    Linköping, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping, Sweden; Stockholm, Sweden.
    Interrelated Functional and Structural Amygdala Plasticity Following Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder2015In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 77, no 9 Suppl., p. 51S-51SArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Månsson, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Furmark, Tomas
    Structural but not functional neuroplasticity one year after effective cognitive behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder2017In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 318, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective psychiatric treatments ameliorate excessive anxiety and induce neuroplasticity immediately after the intervention, indicating that emotional components in the human brain are rapidly adaptable. Still, the interplay between structural and functional neuroplasticity is poorly understood, and studies of treatment-induced long-term neuroplasticity are rare. Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (using 3 T MRI) was performed in 13 subjects with social anxiety disorder on 3 occasions over 1 year. All subjects underwent 9 weeks of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy in a randomized cross-over design and independent assessors used the Clinically Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale to determine treatment response. Gray matter (GM) volume, assessed with voxel-based morphometry, and functional blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responsivity to self-referential criticism were compared between treatment responders and non-responders using 2 × 2 (group × time; pretreatment to follow-up) ANOVA. At 1-year follow-up, 7 (54%) subjects were classified as CGI-I responders. Left amygdala GM volume was more reduced in responders relative to non-responders from pretreatment to 1-year follow-up (Z = 3.67, Family-Wise Error corrected p = 0.02). In contrast to previous short-term effects, altered BOLD activations to self-referential criticism did not separate responder groups at follow-up. The structure and function of the amygdala changes immediately after effective psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder, but only reduced amygdala GM volume, and not functional activity, is associated with a clinical response 1 year after CBT.

  • 14. Månsson, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Carlbring, Per
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Furmark, Tomas
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Neuroplasticity in response to cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder2016In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 6, article id e727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with anxiety disorders exhibit excessive neural reactivity in the amygdala, which can be normalized by effective treatment like cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Mechanisms underlying the brain's adaptation to anxiolytic treatments are likely related both to structural plasticity and functional response alterations, but multimodal neuroimaging studies addressing structure-function interactions are currently missing. Here, we examined treatment-related changes in brain structure (gray matter (GM) volume) and function (blood-oxygen level dependent, BOLD response to self-referential criticism) in 26 participants with social anxiety disorder randomly assigned either to CBT or an attention bias modification control treatment. Also, 26 matched healthy controls were included. Significant time x treatment interactions were found in the amygdala with decreases both in GM volume (family-wise error (FWE) corrected P-FWE = 0.02) and BOLD responsivity (P-FWE = 0.01) after successful CBT. Before treatment, amygdala GM volume correlated positively with anticipatory speech anxiety (P-FWE = 0.04), and CBT-induced reduction of amygdala GM volume (pre-post) correlated positively with reduced anticipatory anxiety after treatment (P-FWE <= 0.05). In addition, we observed greater amygdala neural responsivity to self-referential criticism in socially anxious participants, as compared with controls (P-FWE = 0.029), before but not after CBT. Further analysis indicated that diminished amygdala GM volume mediated the relationship between decreased neural responsivity and reduced social anxiety after treatment (P = 0.007). Thus, our results suggest that improvement-related structural plasticity impacts neural responsiveness within the amygdala, which could be essential for achieving anxiety reduction with CBT.

  • 15.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Solna, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Frontal Contribution to Hippocampal Hyperactivity During Memory Encoding in Aging2019In: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5099, Vol. 12, article id 229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hippocampal hypo- as well as hyper-activation have been reported during memory encoding in older individuals. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) provides top-down state signals to the hippocampus that bias its computation during memory encoding and retrieval, and disturbed top-down signals could contribute to hippocampal hyper-activation. Here, we used >500 cross-sectional and longitudinal observations from a face-name encoding-retrieval fMRI task to examine hippocampal hypo-and hyper-activation in aging. Age-related anterior hippocampal hypo-activation was observed during memory encoding. Next, older individuals who longitudinally dropped-out were compared with those who remained in the study. Older dropouts had lower memory performance and higher dementia risk, and hyper-activated right anterior and posterior hippocampus during memory encoding. During encoding, the dropouts also activated right prefrontal regions that instead were active during retrieval in younger and older remainers. Moreover, the dropouts showed altered frontal-hippocampal functional connectivity, notably elevated right PFC to anterior hippocampus (aHC) connectivity during encoding. In the context of a general pattern of age-related anterior hippocampal hypo-activation during encoding, these findings support a top-down contribution to paradoxically high anterior hippocampal activity in older dropouts who were at elevated risk of pathology.

  • 16.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    The APOE epsilon 4 allele in relation to brain white-matter microstructure in adulthood and aging2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 263-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele is a major genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease and has been associated with structural and functional brain alterations across the adult life span. Recent studies have presented evidence that epsilon 4 affects microstructural properties of brain white matter (WM) in non-demented carriers of the epsilon 4 allele, but conflicting evidence has been presented as well. The main purpose of the present study was therefore to examine ApoE effects on WM in a large sample of middle-aged and older adults (N=273). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data was acquired, and tract-based as well as voxel-wise analyses were conducted. The tract-based analyses revealed no significant ApoE effects, and no significant interactions between genotype and age were observed. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that ApoE effects on white-matter microstructure are less abundant than has been suggested in some previous studies.

  • 17.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Kalpouzos, Grégoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Lind, Johanna
    Center for Study of Human Cognition, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Pudas, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Persson, Jonas
    Department of Psychology and Stockholm Brain Institute, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Department of Psychology and Stockholm Brain Institute, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Longitudinal evidence for diminished frontal cortex function in aging2010In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 107, no 52, p. 22682-22686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sectional estimates of age-related changes in brain structure and function were compared with 6-y longitudinal estimates. The results indicated increased sensitivity of the longitudinal approach as well as qualitative differences. Critically, the cross-sectional analyses were suggestive of age-related frontal overrecruitment, whereas the longitudinal analyses revealed frontal underrecruitment with advancing age. The cross-sectional observation of overrecruitment reflected a select elderly sample. However, when followed over time, this sample showed reduced frontal recruitment. These findings dispute inferences of true age changes on the basis of age differences, hence challenging some contemporary models of neurocognitive aging, and demonstrate age-related decline in frontal brain volume as well as functional response.

  • 18. Papenberg, Goran
    et al.
    Jonasson, Lars S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Koehncke, Ylva
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 65 Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Lovden, Martin
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Backman, Lars
    Mapping the landscape of human dopamine D2/3 receptors with [11C]raclopride2019In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 224, no 8, p. 2871-2882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dopamine D2/3 system is fundamental for sensory, motor, emotional, and cognitive aspects of behavior. Small-scale human histopathological and animal studies show high density of D2/3 dopamine receptors (D2/3DR) in striatum, but also demonstrate the existence of such receptors across cortical and limbic regions. Assessment of D2/3DR BPND in the extrastriatal regions with [C-11]raclopride has long been considered unreliable due to the relatively low density of D2/3DR outside the striatum. We describe the distribution and interregional links of D2/3DR availability measured with PET and [C-11]raclopride across the human brain in a large sample (N = 176; age range 64-68 years). Structural equation modeling revealed that D2/3DR availability can be organized according to anatomical (nigrostriatal, mesolimbic, mesocortical) and functional (limbic, associative, sensorimotor) dopamine pathways. D2/3DR availability in corticolimbic functional subdivisions showed differential associations to corresponding striatal subdivisions, extending animal and pharmacological work. Our findings provide evidence on the dimensionality and organization of [C-11]raclopride D2/3DR availability in the living human brain that conforms to known dopaminergic pathways.

  • 19. Papenberg, Goran
    et al.
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bäckman, Lars
    The Influence of Hippocampal Dopamine D2 Receptors on Episodic Memory Is Modulated by BDNF and KIBRA Polymorphisms2019In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1422-1429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Episodic memory is a polygenic trait influenced by different molecular mechanisms. We used PET and a candidate gene approach to investigate how individual differences at the molecular level translate into between-person differences in episodic memory performance of elderly persons. Specifically, we examined the interactive effects between hippocampal dopamine D2 receptor (D2DR) availability and candidate genes relevant for hippocampus-related memory functioning. We show that the positive effects of high D2DR availability in the hippocampus on episodic memory are confined to carriers of advantageous genotypes of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, rs6265) and the kidney and brain expressed protein (KIBRA, rs17070145) polymorphisms. By contrast, these polymorphisms did not modulate the positive relationship between caudate D2DR availability and episodic memory.

  • 20.
    Papenberg, Goran
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Berlin, Germany; London, UK.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Genetics and Functional Imaging: Effects of APOE, BDNF, COMT, and KIBRA in Aging2015In: Neuropsychology Review, ISSN 1040-7308, E-ISSN 1573-6660, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 47-62Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal molecular-genetic studies suggests that effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning increase with aging. We review the influence of candidate genes on brain functioning in old age, focusing on four genetic variations that have been extensively investigated: APOE, BDNF, COMT, and KIBRA. Similar to the behavioral evidence, there are reports from age-comparative studies documenting stronger genetic effects on measures of brain functioning in older adults compared to younger adults. This pattern suggests disproportionate impairments of neural processing among older individuals carrying disadvantageous genotypes. We discuss various factors, including gene-gene interactions, study population characteristics, lifestyle factors, and diseases, that need to be considered in future studies and may help understand inconsistent findings in the extant literature.

  • 21.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Decoding the complex brain: multivariate and multimodal analyses of neuroimaging data2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional brain images are extraordinarily rich data sets that reveal distributed brain networks engaged in a wide variety of cognitive operations. It is a substantial challenge both to create models of cognition that mimic behavior and underlying cognitive processes and to choose a suitable analytic method to identify underlying brain networks.

    Most of the contemporary techniques used in analyses of functional neuroimaging data are based on univariate approaches in which single image elements (i.e. voxels) are considered to be computationally independent measures. Beyond univariate methods (e.g. statistical parametric mapping), multivariate approaches, which identify a network across all regions of the brain rather than a tessellation of regions, are potentially well suited for analyses of brain imaging data. A multivariate method (e.g. partial least squares) is a computational strategy that determines time-varying distributed patterns of the brain (as a function of a cognitive task). Compared to its univariate counterparts, a multivariate approach provides greater levels of sensitivity and reflects cooperative interactions among brain regions. Thus, by considering information across more than one measuring point, additional information on brain function can be revealed.

    Similarly, by considering information across more than one measuring technique, the nature of underlying cognitive processes become well-understood. Cognitive processes have been investigated in conjunction with multiple neuroimaging modalities (e.g. fMRI, sMRI, EEG, DTI), whereas the typical method has been to analyze each modality separately. Accordingly, little work has been carried out to examine the relation between different modalities. Indeed, due to the interconnected nature of brain processing, it is plausible that changes in one modality locally or distally modulate changes in another modality.

    This thesis focuses on multivariate and multimodal methods of image analysis applied to various cognitive questions. These methods are used in order to extract features that are inaccessible using univariate / unimodal analytic approaches. To this end, I implemented multivariate partial least squares analysis in study I and II in order to identify neural commonalities and differences between the available and accessible information in memory (study I), and also between episodic encoding and episodic retrieval (study II). Study I provided evidence of a qualitative differences between availability and accessibility signals in memory by linking memory access to modality-independent brain regions, and availability in memory to elevated activity in modality-specific brain regions. Study II provided evidence in support of general and specific memory operations during encoding and retrieval by linking general processes to the joint demands on attentional, executive, and strategic processing, and a process-specific network to core episodic memory function. In study II, III, and IV, I explored whether the age-related changes/differences in one modality were driven by age-related changes/differences in another modality. To this end, study II investigated whether age-related functional differences in hippocampus during an episodic memory task could be accounted for by age-related structural differences. I found that age-related local structural deterioration could partially but not entirely account for age-related diminished hippocampal activation. In study III, I sought to explore whether age-related changes in the prefrontal and occipital cortex during a semantic memory task were driven by local and/or distal gray matter loss. I found that age-related diminished prefrontal activation was driven, at least in part, by local gray matter atrophy, whereas the age-related decline in occipital cortex was accounted for by distal gray matter atrophy. Finally, in study IV, I investigated whether white matter (WM) microstructural differences mediated age-related decline in different cognitive domains. The findings implicated WM as one source of age-related decline on tasks measuring processing speed, but they did not support the view that age-related differences in episodic memory, visuospatial ability, or fluency were strongly driven by age-related differences in white-matter pathways.

    Taken together, the architecture of different aspects of episodic memory (e.g. encoding vs. retrieval; availability vs. accessibility) was characterized using a multivariate partial least squares. This finding highlights usefulness of multivariate techniques in guiding cognitive theories of episodic memory. Additionally, competing theories of cognitive aging were investigated by multimodal integration of age-related changes in brain structure, function, and behavior. The structure-function relationships were specific to brain regions and cognitive domains. Finally, we urged that contemporary theories on cognitive aging need to be extended to longitudinal measures to be further validated.

  • 22.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Avelar-Pereira, Barbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Garzon, Benjamin
    Sitnikov, Rouslan
    Kalpouzos, Gregoria
    Functional coherence of striatal resting-state networks is modulated by striatal iron content2018In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 183, p. 495-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resting-state spontaneous fluctuations have revealed individual differences in the functional architecture of brain networks. Previous research indicates that the striatal network shows alterations in neurological conditions but also in normal aging. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying individual differences in striatal resting-state networks (RSNs) have been less explored. One candidate that may account for individual differences in striatal spontaneous activity is the level of local iron accumulation. Excessive iron in the striatum has been linked to a loss of structural integrity and reduced brain activity during task performance in aging. Using independent component analysis in a sample of 42 younger and older adults, we examined whether higher striatal iron content, quantified using relaxometry, underlies individual differences in spontaneous fluctuations of RSNs in general, and of the striatum in particular. Higher striatal iron content was linked to lower spontaneous coherence within both caudate and putamen RSNs regardless of age. No such links were observed for other RSNs. Moreover, the number of connections between the putamen and other RSNs was negatively associated with iron content, suggesting that iron modulated the degree of cross-talk between the striatum and cerebral cortex. Importantly, these associations were primarily driven by the older group. Finally, a positive association was found between coherence in the putamen and motor performance, suggesting that this spontaneous activity is behaviorally meaningful. A follow-up mediation analysis also indicated that functional connectivity may mediate the link between striatal iron and motor performance. Our preliminary findings suggest that striatal iron potentially accounts for individual differences in spontaneous striatal fluctuations, and might be used as a locus of intervention.

  • 23.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Kompus, Kristiina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Habib, Reza
    Southern Illinois University , Carbondale.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Characterizing the neural correlates of modality-specific and modality-independent accessibility and availability signals in memory using partial-least squares2010In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 686-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that information that currently cannot be retrieved but will be retrieved on a subsequent, more supported task (i.e. is available but not accessible) has a distinct neural signature compared with non-available information. For verbal paired-associates, an availability signal has been revealed in left middle temporal cortex, an area potentially involved in the storage of such information, raising the possibility that availability signals are expressed in modality-specific storage sites. In the present study subjects encoded pictures and sounds representing concrete objects. One day later, during fMRI scanning, a verbal cued-recall task was administrated followed by a post-scan recognition task. Items remembered on both tasks were classified as accessible; items not remembered on the first but on the second task were classified as available; and items not remembered on any of the tasks were classified as not available. Multivariate partial-least-squares analyses revealed a modality-independent accessibility network with dominant contributions of left inferior parietal cortex, left inferior frontal cortex, and left hippocampus. Additionally, a modality-specific availability network was identified which included increased activity in visual regions for available pictorial information and in auditory regions for available sound information. These findings show that availability in memory, at least in part, is characterized by systematic changes in brain activity in sensory regions whereas memory access reflects differential activity in a modality-independent, conceptual network, thus indicating qualitative differences between availability and accessibility in memory.

  • 24.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Age-related white matter microstructural differences partly mediate age-related decline in processing speed but not cognition2012In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1822, no 3, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging is associated with declining cognitive performance as well as structural changes in brain gray and white matter (WM). The WM deterioration contributes to a disconnection among distributed brain networks and may thus mediate age-related cognitive decline. The present diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigated age-related differences in WM microstructure and their relation to cognition (episodic memory, visuospatial processing, fluency, and speed) in a large group of healthy subjects (n=287) covering 6 decades of the human life span. Age related decreases in fractional anisotropy (FA) and increases in mean diffusivity (MD) were observed across the entire WM skeleton as well as in specific WM tracts, supporting the WM degeneration hypothesis. The anterior section of the corpus callosum was more susceptible to aging compared to the posterior section, lending support to the anterior-posterior gradient of WM integrity in the corpus callosum. Finally, and of critical interest, WM integrity differences were found to mediate age-related reductions in processing speed but no significant mediation was found for episodic memory, visuospatial ability, or fluency. These findings suggest that compromised WM integrity is not a major contributing factor to declining cognitive performance in normal aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Imaging Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative disease.

  • 25.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Opposing effects of aging on large-scale brain systems for memory encoding and cognitive control2012In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 32, no 31, p. 10749-10757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Episodic memory declines with advancing age. Neuroimaging studies have associated such decline to age-related changes in general cognitive-control networks as well as to changes in process-specific encoding or retrieval networks. To assess the specific influence of aging on encoding and retrieval processes and associated brain systems, it is vital to dissociate encoding and retrieval from each other and from shared cognitive-control processes. We used multivariate partial-least-squares to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging data from a large population-based sample (n = 292, 25-80 years). The participants performed a face-name paired-associates task and an active baseline task. The analysis revealed two significant network patterns. The first reflected a process-general encoding-retrieval network that included frontoparietal cortices and posterior hippocampus. The second pattern dissociated encoding and retrieval networks. The anterior hippocampus was differentially engaged during encoding. Brain scores, representing whole-brain integrated measures of how strongly an individual recruited a brain network, were correlated with cognitive performance and chronological age. The scores from the general cognitive-control network correlated negatively with episodic memory performance and positively with age. The encoding brain scores, which strongly reflected hippocampal functioning, correlated positively with episodic memory performance and negatively with age. Univariate analyses confirmed that bilateral hippocampus showed the most pronounced activity reduction in older age, and brain structure analyses found that the activity reduction partly related to hippocampus atrophy. Collectively, these findings suggest that age-related structural brain changes underlie age-related reductions in the efficient recruitment of a process-specific encoding network, which cascades into upregulated recruitment of a general cognitive-control network.

  • 26.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Garrett, Douglas D.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Papenberg, Goran
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
    Jonasson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Lövdén, Martin
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Bäckman, Lars
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Dopamine D2/3 Binding Potential Modulates Neural Signatures of Working Memory in a Load-Dependent Fashion.2019In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 537-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dopamine (DA) modulates corticostriatal connections. Studies in which imaging of the DA system is integrated with functional imaging during cognitive performance have yielded mixed findings. Some work has shown a link between striatal DA (measured by PET) and fMRI activations, whereas others have failed to observe such a relationship. One possible reason for these discrepant findings is differences in task demands, such that a more demanding task with greater prefrontal activations may yield a stronger association with DA. Moreover, a potential DA–BOLD association may be modulated by task performance. We studied 155 (104 normal-performing and 51 low-performing) healthy older adults (43% females) who underwent fMRI scanning while performing a working memory (WM) n-back task along with DA D2/3 PET assessment using [11C]raclopride. Using multivariate partial-least-squares analysis, we observed a significant pattern revealing positive associations of striatal as well as extrastriatal DA D2/3 receptors to BOLD response in the thalamo–striatal–cortical circuit, which supports WM functioning. Critically, the DA–BOLD association in normal-performing, but not low-performing, individuals was expressed in a load-dependent fashion, with stronger associations during 3-back than 1-/2-back conditions. Moreover, normal-performing adults expressing upregulated BOLD in response to increasing task demands showed a stronger DA–BOLD association during 3-back, whereas low-performing individuals expressed a stronger association during 2-back conditions. This pattern suggests a nonlinear DA–BOLD performance association, with the strongest link at the maximum capacity level. Together, our results suggest that DA may have a stronger impact on functional brain responses during more demanding cognitive tasks.

  • 27.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Karolinska Inst, Aging Res Ctr, S-11330 Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, S-11330 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pudas, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Elevated hippocampal resting-state connectivity underlies deficient neurocognitive function in aging2014In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, no 49, p. 17654-17659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain is not idle during rest. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have identified several resting-state networks, including the default mode network (DMN), which contains a set of cortical regions that interact with a hippocampus (HC) subsystem. Age-related alterations in the functional architecture of the DMN and HC may influence memory functions and possibly constitute a sensitive biomarker of forthcoming memory deficits. However, the exact form of DMN-HC alterations in aging and concomitant memory deficits is largely unknown. Here, using both task and resting data from 339 participants (25-80 y old), we have demonstrated age-related decrements in resting-state functional connectivity across most parts of the DMN, except for the HC network for which age-related elevation of connectivity between left and right HC was found along with attenuated HC-cortical connectivity. Elevated HC connectivity at rest, which was partly accounted for by age-related decline in white matter integrity of the fornix, was associated with lower cross-sectional episodic memory performance and declining longitudinal memory performance over 20 y. Additionally, elevated HC connectivity at rest was associated with reduced HC neural recruitment and HC-cortical connectivity during active memory encoding, which suggests that strong HC connectivity restricts the degree to which the HC interacts with other brain regions during active memory processing revealed by task fMRI. Collectively, our findings suggest a model in which age-related disruption in cortico-hippocampal functional connectivity leads to a more functionally isolated HC at rest, which translates into aberrant hippocampal decoupling and deficits during mnemonic processing.

  • 28.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Karolinska Inst, Aging Res Ctr, SE-11330 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Fischer, Håkan
    Bäckman, Lars
    A multivariate analysis of age-related differences in functional networks supporting conflict resolution2014In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 86, p. 150-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional neuroimaging studies demonstrate age-related differences in recruitment of a large-scale attentional network during interference resolution, especially within dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). These alterations in functional responses have been frequently observed despite equivalent task performance, suggesting age-related reallocation of neural resources, although direct evidence for a facilitating effect in aging is sparse. We used the multi-source interference task and multivariate partial-least-squares to investigate age-related differences in the neuronal signature of conflict resolution, and their behavioral implications in younger and older adults. There were interference-related increases in activity, involving fronto-parietal and basal ganglia networks that generalized across age. In addition an age-by-task interaction was observed within a distributed network, including DLPFC and ACC, with greater activity during interference in the old. Next, we combined brain-behavior and functional connectivity analyses to investigate whether compensatory brain changes were present in older adults, using DLPFC and ACC as regions of interest (i.e. seed regions). This analysis revealed two networks differentially related to performance across age groups. A structural analysis revealed age-related gray-matter losses in regions facilitating performance in the young, suggesting that functional reorganization may partly reflect structural alterations in aging. Collectively, these findings suggest that age-related structural changes contribute to reductions in the efficient recruitment of a youth-like interference network, which cascades into instantiation of a different network facilitating conflict resolution in elderly people.

  • 29.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Avelar-Pereira, Bárbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Papenberg, Goran
    Garrett, Douglas D.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Lövdén, Martin
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Bäckman, Lars
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Neurocognitive Profiles of Older Adults with Working-Memory Dysfunction2018In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 2525-2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals differ in how they perceive, remember, and think. There is evidence for the existence of distinct subgroups that differ in cognitive performance within the older population. However, it is less clear how individual differences in cognition in old age are linked to differences in brain-based measures. We used latent-profile analysis on n-back working-memory (WM) performance to identify subgroups in a large sample of older adults (n = 181; age = 64-68 years). Our analysis identified one larger normal subgroup with higher performance (n = 113; 63%), and a second smaller subgroup (n = 55; 31%) with lower performance. The low-performing subgroup showed weaker load-dependent BOLD modulation and lower connectivity within the fronto-parietal network (FPN) as well as between FPN and striatum during n-back, along with lower FPN connectivity at rest. This group also exhibited lower FPN structural integrity, lower frontal dopamine D2 binding potential, inferior performance on offline WM tests, and a trend-level genetic predisposition for lower dopamine-system efficiency. By contrast, this group exhibited relatively intact episodic memory and associated brain measures (i.e., hippocampal volume, structural, and functional connectivity within the default-mode network). Collectively, these data provide converging evidence for the existence of a group of older adults with impaired WM functioning characterized by reduced cortico-striatal coupling and aberrant cortico-cortical integrity within FPN.

  • 30.
    Salami, Alireza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, SE-113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Kaboodvand, Neda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, SE-113 30, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Longitudinal Evidence for Dissociation of Anterior and Posterior MTL Resting-State Connectivity in Aging: Links to Perfusion and Memory2016In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 3953-3963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroimaging studies of spontaneous signal fluctuations as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging have revealed age-related alterations in the functional architecture of brain networks. One such network is located in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), showing structural and functional variations along the anterior-posterior axis. Past cross-sectional studies of MTL functional connectivity (FC) have yielded discrepant findings, likely reflecting the fact that specific MTL subregions are differentially affected in aging. Here, using longitudinal resting-state data from 198 participants, we investigated 5-year changes in FC of the anterior and posterior MTL. We found an opposite pattern, such that the degree of FC within the anterior MTL declined after age 60, whereas elevated FC within the posterior MTL was observed along with attenuated posterior MTL-cortical connectivity. A significant negative change-change relation was observed between episodic-memory decline and elevated FC in the posterior MTL. Additional analyses revealed age-related cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases in posterior MTL at the follow-up session, along with a positive relation of elevated FC and CBF, suggesting that elevated FC is a metabolically demanding alteration. Collectively, our findings indicate that elevated FC in posterior MTL along with increased local perfusion is a sign of brain aging that underlie episodic-memory decline.

  • 31.
    Sandström, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Säll, R
    Peterson, Jonas
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Larsson, A
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Brain activation patterns in major depressive disorder and job stress-related long-term sick leaveArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Sandström, Agneta
    et al.
    Remonthagen Stroke och hjärnskadecenter, Östersund.
    Säll, Roland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Peterson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Larsson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Brain activation patterns in major depressive disorder and work stress-related long-term sick leave among swedish females2012In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 503-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deficits in executive and working-memory functioning associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are prominent in depression and work-related long-term sick leave (LTSL). This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate potential differences in brain activation patterns in these conditions. In addition, the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis was examined and compared between groups. Since there is a clear overrepresentation of women in these diagnostic groups, and to ensure a more homogenous sample population, only women were included. To examine the neural correlates of relevant cognitive processes in patients on sick-leave > 90 days due to work-related LTSL, recently diagnosed patients with major depression (DSM-IV criteria, untreated), and healthy controls (n=10 each group), a 2-back working memory task and a visual long-term memory task were administered during fMRI scanning. HPA-axis functioning was investigated using a diurnal curve of saliva cortisol and a dexamethasone suppression test. Task performance was comparable among the three groups. Multivariate image analysis revealed that both memory tasks engaged a similar brain network in all three groups, including the prefrontal and parietal cortex. During the 2-back task, LTSL patients had significant frontal hypoactivation compared to controls and patients with depression. Saliva cortisol measurements showed a flattening of the diurnal rythmicity in LTSL patients compared to patients with depression and healthy contols. Taken together, these findings indicate that work stress-related LTSL and major depression are dissociable in terms of frontal activation and diurnal cortisol rhythmicity.

  • 33.
    Stomby, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Evang, Johan Arild
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johannsson, Gudmundur
    Ragnarsson, Oskar
    Elevated resting-state connectivity in the medial temporal lobe and the prefrontal cortex among patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission2019In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 5, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Cushing's syndrome is associated with long-term cognitive deficits and affective symptoms such as depression and anxiety. The alterations in brain function under lying these deficits after Cushing's syndrome are unclear and therefore we aimed to explore alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission. Design: Cross-sectional case-control study. Methods: Nineteen women with Cushing's syndrome in remission for a median time of 7 years (IQR: 6-10) and a mean age of 45 years were included at three university clinics. These patients and 38 age-matched female controls underwent brain imaging at a single center. The main outcome measure was functional connectivity at rest, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex networks, exhibited elevated functional connectivity among patients compared to controls. The degree of elevated functional connectivity in the MTL was negatively associated with time in remission. Conclusions: Resting-state functional connectivity within glucocorticoid receptor-rich regions, particularly the MTL and medial prefrontal cortex, was increased in patients. These differences in connectivity may provide a neural basis for the cognitive deficits and affective symptoms commonly experienced by patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission.

  • 34. Thompson, Paul M.
    et al.
    Stein, Jason L.
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Hibar, Derrek P.
    Vasquez, Alejandro Arias
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    Toro, Roberto
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Schumann, Gunter
    Franke, Barbara
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Alda, Martin
    Alhusaini, Saud
    Almasy, Laura
    Almeida, Jorge
    Alpert, Kathryn
    Andreasen, Nancy C.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Apostolova, Liana G.
    Appel, Katja
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Aribisala, Benjamin
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Bauer, Michael
    Bearden, Carrie E.
    Bergmann, Orjan
    Binder, Elisabeth B.
    Blangero, John
    Bockholt, Henry J.
    Boen, Erlend
    Bois, Catherine
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Booth, Tom
    Bowman, Ian J.
    Bralten, Janita
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    Brunner, Han G.
    Brohawn, David G.
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Buitelaar, Jan
    Bulayeva, Kazima
    Bustillo, Juan R.
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Cannon, Dara M.
    Cantor, Rita M.
    Carless, Melanie A.
    Caseras, Xavier
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Chang, Kiki D.
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Cichon, Sven
    Clark, Vincent P.
    Conrod, Patricia
    Coppola, Giovanni
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Czisch, Michael
    Deary, Ian J.
    de Geus, Eco J. C.
    den Braber, Anouk
    Delvecchio, Giuseppe
    Depondt, Chantal
    de Haan, Lieuwe
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Dima, Danai
    Dimitrova, Rali
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Dong, Hongwei
    Donohoe, Gary
    Duggirala, Ravindranath
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Ekman, Carl Johan
    Elvsashagen, Torbjorn
    Emsell, Louise
    Erk, Susanne
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Fagerness, Jesen
    Fears, Scott
    Fedko, Iryna
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Foroud, Tatiana
    Fox, Peter T.
    Francks, Clyde
    Frangou, Sophia
    Frey, Eva Maria
    Frodl, Thomas
    Frouin, Vincent
    Garavan, Hugh
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Glahn, David C.
    Godlewska, Beata
    Goldstein, Rita Z.
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Grimm, Oliver
    Gruber, Oliver
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Gur, Raquel E.
    Gur, Ruben C.
    Goering, Harald H. H.
    Hagenaars, Saskia
    Hajek, Tomas
    Hall, Geoffrey B.
    Hall, Jeremy
    Hardy, John
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Hass, Johanna
    Hatton, Sean N.
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Heinz, Andreas
    Hickie, Ian B.
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Hoehn, David
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Hollinshead, Marisa
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Homuth, Georg
    Hoogman, Martine
    Hong, L. Elliot
    Hosten, Norbert
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    Hwang, Kristy S.
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Jenkinson, Mark
    Johnston, Caroline
    Joensson, Erik G.
    Kahn, Rene S.
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    Kelly, Sinead
    Kim, Sungeun
    Kochunov, Peter
    Koenders, Laura
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Kwok, John B. J.
    Lagopoulos, Jim
    Laje, Gonzalo
    Landen, Mikael
    Landman, Bennett A.
    Lauriello, John
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Lee, Phil H.
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Lemaitre, Herve
    Leonardo, Cassandra D.
    Li, Chiang-shan
    Liberg, Benny
    Liewald, David C.
    Liu, Xinmin
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Loth, Eva
    Lourdusamy, Anbarasu
    Luciano, Michelle
    Macciardi, Fabio
    Machielsen, Marise W. J.
    MacQueen, Glenda M.
    Malt, Ulrik F.
    Mandl, Rene
    Manoach, Dara S.
    Martinot, Jean-Luc
    Matarin, Mar
    Mather, Karen A.
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Mattingsdal, Morten
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    McDonald, Colm
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    McMahon, Francis J.
    McMahon, Katie L.
    Meisenzahl, Eva
    Melle, Ingrid
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Mohnke, Sebastian
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Morris, Derek W.
    Moses, Eric K.
    Mueller, Bryon A.
    Maniega, Susana Munoz
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Mwangi, Benson
    Nauck, Matthias
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Nilsson, Lars-Goeran
    Nugent, Allison C.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Oosterlaan, Jaap
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Paus, Tomas
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Pearlson, Godfrey D.
    Penninx, Brenda W.
    Peterson, Charles P.
    Pfennig, Andrea
    Phillips, Mary
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Poline, Jean-Baptiste
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Puetz, Benno
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Rasmussen, Jerod
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Rijpkema, Mark
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Rose, Emma J.
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Rujescu, Dan
    Ryten, Mina
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Satterthwaite, Theodore D.
    Savitz, Jonathan
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Scanlon, Cathy
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Schnack, Hugo G.
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Schulz, S. Charles
    Schuer, Remmelt
    Seidman, Larry
    Shen, Li
    Shoemaker, Jody M.
    Simmons, Andrew
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    Smith, Colin
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    Soares, Jair C.
    Sponheim, Scott R.
    Sprooten, Emma
    Starr, John M.
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Strakowski, Stephen
    Strike, Lachlan
    Sussmann, Jessika
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Teumer, Alexander
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    Trost, Sarah
    Turner, Jessica
    Van den Heuvel, Martijn
    van der Wee, Nic J.
    van Eijk, Kristel
    van Erp, Theo G. M.
    van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    van 't Ent, Dennis
    van Tol, Marie-Jose
    Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Versace, Amelia
    Voelzke, Henry
    Walker, Robert
    Walter, Henrik
    Wang, Lei
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Weale, Michael E.
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Wen, Wei
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Whalley, Heather C.
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    White, Tonya
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Wittfeld, Katharina
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    Wolf, Christiane
    Zilles, David
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Freimer, Nelson B.
    Lawrence, Natalia S.
    Drevets, Wayne
    The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data2014In: BRAIN IMAGING BEHAV, ISSN 1931-7557, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 153-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way.

  • 35. Ziaei, Maryam
    et al.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center (ARC) at Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Age-related alterations in functional connectivity patterns during working memory encoding of emotional items2017In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 94, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous findings indicate age-related differences in frontal-amygdala connectivity during emotional processing. However, direct evidence for age differences in brain functional activation and connectivity during emotional processing and concomitant behavioral implications is lacking. In the present study, we examined the impact of aging on the neural signature of selective attention to emotional information during working memory (WM) encoding. Participants completed an emotional WM task in which they were asked to attend to emotional targets and ignore irrelevant distractors. Despite an overall reduction in accuracy for older relative to younger adults, no behavioral age effect was observed as a function of emotional valence. The functional connectivity patterns of left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex showed that younger adults recruited one network for encoding of both positive and negative emotional targets and this network contributed to higher memory accuracy in this cohort. Older adults, on the other hand, engaged two distinct networks for encoding of positive and negative targets. The functional connectivity analysis using left amygdala further demonstrated that older adults recruited one single network during encoding of positive as well as negative targets whereas younger adults recruited this network only for encoding of negative items. The engagement of amygdala functional network also contributed to higher memory performance and faster response times in older adults. Our findings provide novel insights into the differential roles of functional brain networks connected to the medial PFC and amygdala during encoding of emotionally-valenced items with advancing age.

  • 36. Zuo, Nianming
    et al.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yang, Yihong
    Yang, Zhengyi
    Sui, Jing
    Jian, Tianzi
    Activation-based association profiles differentiate network roles across cognitive loads2019In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 2800-2812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory (WM) is a complex and pivotal cognitive system underlying the performance of many cognitive behaviors. Although individual differences in WM performance have previously been linked to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response across several large-scale brain networks, the unique and shared contributions of each large-scale brain network to efficient WM processes across different cognitive loads remain elusive. Using a WM paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from the Human Connectome Project, we proposed a framework to assess the association and shared-association strength between imaging biomarkers and behavioral scales. Association strength is the capability of individual brain regions to modulate WM performance and shared-association strength measures how different regions share the capability of modulating performance. Under higher cognitive load (2-back), the frontoparietal executive control network (FPN), dorsal attention network (DAN), and salience network showed significant positive activation and positive associations, whereas the default mode network (DMN) showed the opposite pattern, namely, significant deactivation and negative associations. Comparing the different cognitive loads, the DMN and FPN showed predominant associations and globally shared-associations. When investigating the differences in association from lower to higher cognitive loads, the DAN demonstrated enhanced association strength and globally shared-associations, which were significantly greater than those of the other networks. This study characterized how brain regions individually and collaboratively support different cognitive loads.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf