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  • 1.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Avslutning2011Ingår i: Vinddriven kriminalitet på en vinddriven marknad: Ekonomisk och organiserad brottslighet, Borås: Recito förlag , 2011, 1, s. 206-213Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, DanielUmeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Den ljusskygga ekonomin: Organiserad och ekonomisk brottslighet2008Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Försäkringsbedragarens kriminella historik2014Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Introduktion2011Ingår i: Vinddriven kriminalitet på en vinddriven marknad: Ekonomisk och organiserad brottslighet / [ed] Tage Alalehto, Daniel Larsson, Borås: Recito förlag , 2011, 1, s. 9-23Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 5.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Measuring trust in the police by contextual and individual factors2016Ingår i: International Journal of Law Crime and Justice, ISSN 1756-0616, E-ISSN 1876-763X, Vol. 46, s. 31-42Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigate if procedural justice and police competence affects trust in the police independent on the level of perception of corruption, and whether the impact of procedural justice and police competence varies due to perception of corruption. The data used is European Social Survey round 5 (2010), containing 24 countries. To separate individual effects from aggregate effects we used multilevel analyses. The results show that procedural justice and police efficiency are of importance for trust in the police independent of the perception of corruption. But the results also show that the impact of both procedural justice and police competence varies due to the level of perception of corruption. The conclusion is therefore that the fight against corruption must be prioritized to increase trust in the police.

  • 6.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Measuring white-collar crime perceptions among public and white-collar offenders: a comparative investigation of four European countries2015Ingår i: The Routledge handbook of white-collar and corporate crime in Europe / [ed] van Erp J, Huisman W & Vande Walle G, Oxon/New York: Routledge, 2015Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The roots of modern white-collar crime: does the modern form of white-collar crime have its foundation in the transition from a society dominated by agriculture to one dominated by industry?2009Ingår i: Critical Criminology, ISSN 1205-8629, E-ISSN 1572-9877, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 183-193Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate whether the process of transition from an agricultural to an industrial society was a watershed for white-collar crime, such that this type of crime increased rapidly in connection with the industrialization process. The theoretical reasoning behind this notion is that the transition process promoted a mentality characterized by self-centered values and a culture of competitiveness, which together paved the way for fraud perpetrated at the expense of others. The data are from Statistic Sweden’s historical records and cover the period of 1864–1912. Since there is no way to measure all crimes that can be defined as white collar crime, we have used bankruptcy offences as an example of white collar crime. The results do not support the notion that the transition period from an agricultural to an industrial society showed an increase in bankruptcy offences. Instead, the results show that when fluctuations in the economy are taken into account, the industrialization process per se entailed less bankruptcy offences. On the other hand, other research using the case of Sweden has shown that it was first after World War II that bankruptcy offences increased rapidly. Our argument is that the transition process as a structural mechanism had a greater impact on bankruptcy offences when industrialized capitalism became advanced.

  • 8.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Varför ekobrottsforskningen gått i stå och hur vi skall få den att expandera!: ekobrottslingens demografi, riskfaktorer och kriminella karriär2011Ingår i: Vinddriven kriminalitet på en vinddriven marknad: Ekonomisk och organiserad brottslighet, Borås: Recito förlag , 2011, 1, s. 24-56Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 9.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Vem är den ekonomiske brottslingen?: En jämförelse mellan länder och brottstyper2012Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 49, nr 1, s. 25-44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Who is the economic criminal? A comparison between countries and types of crime In white collar crime research two particularly competing definitions (Sutherland versus the Revisionists) have dominated the field during the last two decades. Sutherland's definition states that the sociodemographic profile is homogeneous (entrepreneur with high education and high or regular income), despite type of white collar crime or context. The definition given by the Revisionists states that white collar criminals' demographic profile is heterogeneous (everyone can be convicted for white collar crime). As a consequence of this divided definitional approach we have a contradictive outcome of who the white collar criminal is. Our purpose is to investigate the qualification of the two definitions by analyzing heterogeneity/homogeneity based on crime type and national context. The investigation is based on seven countries from the EES 2004 (European Social Survey). We use four types of crime. The results show a rather homogeneous demographic profile but there is also a certain substantial heterogeneity depending on kinds of crime and context. The results altogether indicate that the Revisionists' definition is more correct in its description of the white collar criminal than Sutherland's definition. The demographic profile of the white collar criminal seems to be more complex than a profile confined to just one social category would be and the contextual factor has an impact on the variety of the demographic profile. An important task for future research is to hold the door open for further demographic investigations depending on the type of crime and country that the study is based on.

  • 10.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, DanielUmeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Vinddriven kriminalitet på en vinddriven marknad: Ekonomisk och organiserad brottslighet2011Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Alalehto, Tage
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Who was the white collar criminal?: white collar criminals in Sweden, 1865-19122011Ingår i: Capitalism in business, politics and society / [ed] Eugene N. Shelton, Hauppauge, N.Y.: Nova Science Publisher's , 2011, s. 77-91Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Who was the white collar criminal? During the last few years this question has been an increasingly popular topic in the field of white collar crime. But very few have asked who the white collar criminal was in the past. Our aim is to investigate the demographic character of the white collar criminal during the first industrial revolution and the implementation of capitalism in Sweden (1865-1912). Data comes from Statistics Sweden‘s historical statistics record regarding a section of the law that concerns offenses in bankruptcy. The hypothesis put forward is that the impact of industrialism and capitalism changes the socio-demographic profile regarding offenders of bankruptcy. The results, however, indicate that the profile did not change, which implies that the impact of capitalism and industrialism during the first period in Sweden did not have any impact on the characteristics of the offenders. This is in line with recent research showing that there is no correlation between the number of bankruptcy offenses and industrialization during this period. Furthermore, the results show that there are great similarities in the socio-demographic profile during this period with the same profile today. This result clearly contradicts the common understanding among many researchers in the field that modern white collar crime has its roots in capitalism and industrialization. Rather, the result shows that the socio-demographic profile is stable and related to other factors. In the conclusion, we discuss the results from the point of view of general understandings of theories such as Wheeler‘s ―fear of falling, Gottfredson and Hirschi‘s self-control theory, and Hirschi‘s theory of social bonds.

  • 12.
    Goossen, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Basic human values and white-collar crime: Findings from Europe2016Ingår i: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. 434-452Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate the relationship between values and white-collar crime. The analyses draw on pooled survey data covering 14 European countries. The value constructs are derived on the basis of the theory of basic human values and seven value constructs are tested in relation to three types of white-collar crime: tax evasion, insurance fraud and bribery. The results show that a majority of the value constructs are statistically significantly related to white-collar crime in the expected direction. The relationships between values and white-collar crime are particularly clear-cut regarding tax evasion and insurance fraud but more mixed regarding bribery. The value constructs ‘universalism/benevolence’, ‘power/achievement’ and ‘stimulation’ yield consistent results across all three crime types. ‘Universalism/benevolence’ levels are negatively associated, while ‘power/achievement’ and ‘stimulation’ levels are positively associated, with odds of having committed white-collar crime. The results suggest that values are relevant predictors when trying to account for variation in white-collar offending.

  • 13. Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    In-work poverty and labour market segmentation: A Study of National Policies. Sweden2010Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 14.
    Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    In-work poverty in a transitional labour market: Sweden, 1988-20032008Ingår i: The Working Poor in Europe: Employment, Poverty and Globalization, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, s. 155-178Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 15.
    Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Poverty, welfare problems and social exclusion2008Ingår i: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 15-25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates whether, and to what degree, poverty is linked to other types of welfare problems and, in larger perspective, whether the situation can be understood in terms of social exclusion. Two different measures of poverty – income poverty and deprivation poverty – and 17 indicators of welfare problems were used in the analysis. It was shown that income poverty was rather weakly related to other types of welfare problems, i.e. the most commonly used measure of poverty seems to discriminate a section of the population that does not suffer from the kinds of problems we usually assume that poverty causes. Deprivation poverty, identifying those who most often had to forgo consumption of goods and services, did correlate strongly with other types of welfare problems. Hence, people living under poor conditions do suffer from welfare problems even though this section of the population is not always captured by income poverty measures. The final analysis showed that the types of welfare problems that were most likely to cluster were deprivation poverty, economic precariousness, unemployment, psychological strain and health problems. Whether these types of accumulated welfare problems, from a theoretical perspective, can be seen as indicators of social exclusion is more doubtful.

  • 16.
    Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Gordon, David
    Ritakallio, Veli-Matti
    Relative deprivation: a comparative analysis of Britain, Finland and Sweden2006Ingår i: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 328-345Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Are the self-employed really that poor? Income poverty and living standard among self-employed in Sweden2015Ingår i: Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, ISSN 2000-8023, E-ISSN 2000-8023, Vol. 6, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Small enterprises are often highlighted by politicians as important engines of economic growth and job creation. However, previous research suggests that self-employment might not be equally beneficial for individuals in terms of their income compared to regular employment. Several studies have in fact found that the self-employed may face a substantially higher poverty risk than do regular employees. The aim of the present study is to investigate to what extent income poverty is a good predictor of actual living standards among the self-employed. Is the relationship between income poverty and living standards different for self-employed compared to the regularly employed? To investigate this question we use a unique Swedish survey dataset including regularly employed (n 2,642) as well as self-employed (over-sampled, n 2,483). Income poverty is defined as living in a household with less than 60% of the median household income. Living standards are measured with a deprivation index based on 29 consumption indicators. The results show that even though income poverty is more prevalent among the self-employed than among the regularly employed, no evidence can be found suggesting that the self-employed have a lower standard of living than the regularly employed. Furthermore, when specifically comparing income poor self-employed with income poor regularly employed, we find that the income poor self-employed score significantly lower on the deprivation index even after the compositional characteristics of both groups are taken into account. The conclusion is that poverty measures based on income data underestimate the actual living standard of the self-employed.

  • 18.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    The prevalence, characteristics and well-being of 'necessity' self-employed and 'latent' entrepreneurs: findings from Sweden2016Ingår i: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 58-77Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-employment is often discussed in terms of 'push' and 'pull' factors. The aim of this article is to assess not only the prevalence of 'necessity' self-employed and 'latent' entrepreneurs in Sweden, but also the characteristics in terms of socio-demography, personality traits, intrinsic work motivation and preference for independence associated with each group. In addition, the article investigates whether 'necessity' self-employment and 'latent' entrepreneurship are related to four measures of well-being. This is done using a nationally representative survey of the self-employed (small-business owners, n = 2,483) and regularly employed (n = 2,642) in Sweden. The main findings indicate that 'necessity' self-employed have characteristics and preferences that differ from other (non-'necessity') self-employed. They display relatively low intrinsic work motivation and preference for independence as well as scores on personality traits typically associated with entrepreneurship. They also report lower levels of work autonomy, job-satisfaction, life satisfaction and family-life satisfaction than other self-employed. 'Latent' entrepreneurs resemble entrepreneurs in many ways but they nevertheless report lower levels of well-being than non-'necessity' self-employed.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Exposure to crime as a consequence of poverty: five investigations about relative deprivation, poverty and exposure to crime2006Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contains five studies that in different ways investigate poverty and the relation between poverty and exposure to crime. The basis of the thesis has been the question of how poverty is related to other welfare problems such as unemployment and health problems, focusing on exposure to crime and fear of crime. The thesis also has a comparative element. In one article, the conditions in Britain, Finland and Sweden are compared, and two articles compare conditions in Britain and Sweden.

    Poverty has been measured as relative deprivation. This is done by measuring consumption of socially perceived necessities, both goods and activities. For poverty to be at hand, not consuming some of the goods or not engaging in some of the activities must be a consequence of lack of economic resources, not of personal preference. The relation between poverty and exposure to crime has been understood from an interactionist perspective, where the possible interaction between and intersection of potential offender and potential victim constitute the determinant factor for the risk of being exposed to crime. In this perspective, the poor are more exposed because their situation of being poor places them in situations where the risks of being exposed are high. Fear of crime stems from different sources. The significance of earlier victimization, the characteristics of the geographical unit where one lives and vulnerability in the event of actual exposure have been investigated.

    It was found that poverty measured as relative deprivation is related to other welfare problems, primarily other economic problems, unemployment, health impairments, anxiety, sleeping problems and headaches. But it was also found that poverty is related to exposure to crime and fear of crime. Furthermore, poverty based on an income measure did not correlate especially well with other welfare problems. It was also found that the extent of poverty measured as relative deprivation is equal in Britain and Sweden, while it is more extensive in Finland. This result contradicts earlier studies based on income measurements of poverty, which show that poverty is about equally common in Sweden and Finland and more extensive in Britain. It was found that the reason why relative deprivation is more extensive in Finland is that the level of unemployment is higher there and that the unemployed are worse off in Finland than in Britain and Sweden.

    Regarding the relation between poverty and exposure to property crime, it was found that the poor are more exposed than are the non-poor with regard to the property crime that violates personal integrity most: property crime related to the residence. Exposure to crime was found to be more of a poverty problem in Sweden than in Britain. Because crime rates are about equal in Britain and Sweden, the result indicates that the risk of being exposed to crime in Britain is more equally distributed across the population. Furthermore, it was found that fear of crime in Sweden is related to poverty, while fear of crime in Britain is more related to vulnerability in general, particularly vulnerability on the labour market. One reason for this may be that fear of crime is more common in Britain than in Sweden. Fear of crime may be such a general problem in Britain that the poor cannot be differentiated from the non-poor.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Exposure to property crime as a consequence of poverty2006Ingår i: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 45-60Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates whether and why the poor are more exposed to property crime than are the non-poor, despite the reasonable assumption that poor people lack or have little valuable property that can be stolen. If poor people are more exposed to property crime than those who are not poor, there are needs for explanations. The paper investigates two plausible reasons: the significance of the neighbourhood character and routine activities. The results in the paper indicates that poor people are more exposed to property crimes related to the residence, independent of neighbourhood character and routine activities, while exposure to property crimes related to vehicles depends more on the family situation and age than on poverty per se. When it comes to other kinds of property crime, poor people do not seem to be more exposed than do the nonpoor. That poor people are more exposed to property crime related to their residence, and that there are problem areas explaining why, is worrisome. Those who are poor are often vulnerable to other social problems that tend to exclude them from ordinary living patterns. To find out the relation between poverty and exposure to property crimes related to residence is of importance for crime prevention and probably an important step to prevent those who are poor from being further excluded from society.

  • 21.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Fear of Crime among the Poor in Britain and Sweden2009Ingår i: International Review of Victimology, ISSN 0269-7580, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 223-254Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 22.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Poverty and exposure to crime in Britain and SwedenManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 23.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Statens roller2014Ingår i: Ekonomisk sociologi: En introduktion / [ed] Reza Azarian, Adel Daoud, Bengt Larsson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, 1, s. 175-194Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 24.
    Larsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Alalehto, Tage
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The Reaction Towards White Collar Crime: When White Collar Crime Matters2013Ingår i: The Open Criminology Journal, ISSN 1874-9178, Vol. 6, s. 1-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present article, we analyze socio-demographic profiles regarding wrongful attitudes toward white-collar crime. This is a well-researched area, however where the vast majority of the studies comes from the USA and UK. In this paper we will investigate wrongful attitudes in a different context – Sweden. We will furthermore not only focus on those having a restricted view of white collar crime, but also people with a liberal view, i.e. people who do not consider white collar crime to be seriously wrong. To identify different groups regarding attitudes towards white collar crime we have used Latent Class Analyses, with the result that we can identify four different groups, among which we focus on a large group (containing 35 % of the sample) having the most restricted view of white collar crime, and a small group (4.5 % of the sample) having the most liberal view of white collar crime. The socio-demographic profile of people having a restricted view of white collar crime is quite similar to the previous research. The restricted group consists in general of elderly women that infrequently uses Internet. The liberal group is in great extent an opposite group – containing young men regularly using Internet. We conclude that it is the latter group that is of most interest for future research, not the least be-cause it is a group that may be breeding general distrust, which may strain the society’s social solidarity and trustfulness.

  • 25.
    Larsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Halleröd, Björn
    Sweden: the impact of policy and labour market transformation2011Ingår i: Working poverty in europe: a comparative approach / [ed] Neil Fraser, Rodolfo Gutiérrez and Ramon Peña-Casas, Palegrave Macmillan , 2011, s. 112-132Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26.
    Larsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Schmauch, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Perception of race discrimination by the police in Europe2017Ingår i: Police brutality, racial profiling, and discrimination in the criminal justice system / [ed] Stephen Egharevba, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2017, s. 13-37Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedural justice is an important principle in democratic societies, which fails when police discriminate minorities through for example racial profiling and during crime report procedures. This not only violates individuals’ rights, it also increases corruption, make police work problematic and decrease trust in the justice system. The aim of the chapter is to investigate perception of police discrimination against minorities, with focus on whether anti-immigrant attitudes have an independent impact on the perception of police discrimination. We use European Social Survey, collected in 2010, including 24 countries and around 45,000 respondents. The results show that anti-immigrant attitudes imply that respondents don’t believe the police to discriminate independent on individual factors such as education, gender, minority and country factors such as corruption, inequality and the proportion of non-European inhabitants in the country.

  • 27.
    Skog, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Children of divorce: The effects of post-divorce family re-formation on children's future earningsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    It is not unusual with sequential partnerships today, and more children are nowadays living parts of their childhood in families consisting of both biological parents, non-parental adults, full biological siblings, and half-siblings. The aim of this study is to investigate post-divorce family re-formation regarding the effect on future labour market earnings for children. Three factors are investigated: 1) family re-formation, 2) half-siblings and 3) family size. We employ propensity score matching on a population based dataset, a method of advantage when heterogeneity in effects can be suspected. We find no evidence of effects of family re-formation, nor the occurrence of half-siblings, on labour market earnings. We find a substantial negative effect of family size on adult earnings, regardless of re-marriage and half-siblings. This suggests that the childhood circumstances that affect adult earnings are related to the nuclear family and family size – including resource dilution from siblings – regardless of whether these children originate in the nuclear family or in the divorced and re-formed family.

  • 28.
    Stattin, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The labour market in agening Sweden: lifecourse influences on workforce participation2015Ingår i: Population ageing from a lifecourse perspective: critical and international approaches / [ed] Kathrin Komp & Stina Johansson, Bristol: Policy Press, 2015, s. 203-220Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 29.
    Örestig, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Stattin, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Retirement preferences before and after pension reform: Evidence from a Swedish natural experimentManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the change of retirement preferences in the Swedish work force between 2002/2003 (t0) and 2010/2011 (t1). In 2003 a new pension system was introduced in Sweden. A central aim was to postpone retirement. Work incentives were strengthened by linking benefits more closely to the individual’s labour market participation. Also, older workers were given the right to work until age 67 which meant that age 65 was abandoned as the statutory age of retirement.

    Drawing on cross-sectional data from the PSAE surveys in t0 and t1, the aim of the paper is to examine how retirement preferences developed between the time when the new system was about to be introduced and a time when it had been set in place. The study design has the character of a natural experiment. The main results show that there was substantial change in how retirement preferences were distributed in the two time-points.

    In general, the 55–64 year-olds in t1 preferred to retire later than the same age group did in t0. The share of the older workforce which preferred to retire beyond 65 doubled and the increase was clustered around age 67. Most strikingly, this pattern applies to most sub-categories. Even those who reported poor health and poor work environment preferred to retire later in t1 than the corresponding category did in the preceding time-point. The results indicate that the strengthened work incentives and public campaigns to raise awareness of them have had a general impact on the older workforce in Sweden. The strong increase in age 67 as a preferred exit age indicates that the norm of suitable exit age is being delayed from 65 to 67.

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