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  • 1.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Becoming a teacher of young children: student teachers' understanding of professional learning and professional identity2008In: Asia-Pacific education research association conference, 2008, 26-28 November, Singapore, Singapore: National Institute of Education Singapore , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract
  • 2.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chinese daycare in cultural change1996In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, ISSN 1404-7659, no 4, p. 17-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chinese daycare in cultural change1997In: European Conference On Educational Research, 17-19 September, 1997, Sevilla, Spain, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chinese daycare in cultural change1996Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gu, Limin
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden .
    Chinese early childhood education in transition2006In: Wingspan: the Pedamorphosis communiqué, ISSN 0892-2659, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Comparison of national preschool curricula in China and Sweden2006In: Asia-Pacific Education Research Association Conference, 2006, 28 – 30 November, Hong Kong, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Digital Transformation in Education and Its impact on School Governance: The European and Swedish Experiences and Reflections2019In: International Conference in School Governance: Trends, Challenges and Countermeasures / [ed] The Institution of Schooling Reform and Development, ECNU, Shanghai, China, 2019, p. 68-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses the transformation of school governance in the era of digitalization in education. It focuses on how the production and use of big data at different levels affect policymaking and how big data-based policies have the consequences in education practices within the European education contexts and from the Swedish experiences. The datafication of education through digital technology gives rise to the digital governance of education that increasingly influences the organisation and management of the national education system, which is resulted in the structure shifts in education governance. On the one hand, big data derived from testing and surveys facilitates the comparison and creation of global benchmarks that impacts the governance of education systems to be more centralised at international and national level. And on the other hand, when data and information become more available at the local level, it enables organisational-level decision-making to break down hierarchical structures and become more distributed. Data based steering at different levels then puts considerable pressure on schools through the organised school inspection system, the strategy of self-monitoring, self-evaluation and self-formation that are closely related to managerial accountability or answerability of school governance.

  • 8.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    From national commitment and initiatives to implementation in the classroom: some critical issues on integration of ICT into education in the Swedish context2011In: The University of the Fraser Valley Research Review, ISSN 1715-9849, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1994 Sweden has carried out a number of initiatives funded by the government and other actors for integrating ICT into education. Huge amounts of money have been invested in developing infrastructure and raising teachers’ level of ICT knowledge and competence. However, it seems that there is still a gap between the claims for ICT use in education and the current practice of integrating ICT into the classroom. Some recent investigations indicate that a majority of Swedish teachers actually do not use computers in the classroom as much as they are expected to do. Knowledge about the use of ICT in teacher education is reported as being not good enough. This paper intends to describe the status quo of ICT integration in education in the Swedish context and discuss some critical issues on effective ICT practice in schools in relation to the demands on teachers and their professional development, and thus provide some backgrounds for suggesting models of Technology Enhanced Teacher Professional Development.

  • 9.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Home-school Communication through a Web-based Learning Management System: Experiences and lessons2018In: The International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education (ICICTE 2018) Proceedings / [ed] Linda Morris, Costas Tsolakidis, Chania, Greece, 2018, p. 198-212Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ (N=454) experiences and perceptions with regard to the use of a new web-based learning management system (LS) in home-school communication in Swedish schools. The results indicated a great dissatisfaction with its functional features among the teachers, which negatively impacted the attitudes and beliefs towards the usefulness and ease of use of LS for communication. This in turn prevented teachers’ and parents’ use of the LS and caused a general decrease in home-school communication in daily pr actices, especially for those disadvantaged parent.

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  • 10.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Integrating Web-based Learning Management System in Home-school Communication2018In: EDULEARN18 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Palma, Spain: IATED , 2018, p. 4255-4264Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-functioning home-school communication is seen as a fundamental prerequisite for improving parental involvement in school development and in children’s schooling. Traditionally, face-to-face, telephone and email contacts between teachers and parents have been the main pathways for home-school communication. Nowadays, almost all K-12 schools in Sweden have an integrated so-called learning management system (LMS) that enables the systematic management of school administration, teaching and learning, as well as internal and external information and communication. In spring 2015, one municipality in Sweden started to implement a new web-based LMS called Learning Space (LS) in all public schools. To evaluate its implementation process with regard to the teachers’ experiences, an online questionnaire was sent to all grade 1-12 teachers in the municipality. This study is part of the evaluation project. The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ (N=454) experiences and perceptions with regard to the use of LS in home-school communication. The utilisation of LMS framework developed by Asiri, Mahmud, Bakar and Ayub (2012) was adopted to identify critical factors for integrating new technology. The results indicated a great dissatisfaction with functional features of LS and the implementation process among the teachers, which negatively impacted the attitudes and beliefs towards the usefulness and ease of use of LS for communication between home and school. This in turn prevented teachers’ and parents’ use of LS, and caused a general decrease in home-school communication in daily practices, especially for those disadvantaged parents, according to the teachers. There is a need to reflect on the implementation process and to improve the system. A successful implementation of technology in education calls for policy commitment, quality features of the technical design, sufficient organisational support, and positive personal attitudes and efforts.

  • 11.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Modernisation and marketisation: The Chinese kindergarten in the 1990s2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of changes in Chinese kindergarten education in the era of the post-Mao four modernisations. Based on fieldwork carried out in China in 1997, this thesis examined the changes of Chinese kindergarten education at two levels — changes in system (structural change) and changes in educational activities (curriculum and ideological change), especially for the period of the 1990s. Changes are described and discussed in a historical context, in which both changes in policy and in practice are examined.

    Changes in education are closely linked to the social, political, economic and cultural context. The content, process and outcomes of reform in early childhood education in China have been affected by the national goals of reform, the social context of early educational institutions, their organizational characteristics, family structure, family policy, and the specific professional culture of teaching and learning. Recent structural reforms in early childhood education have been shaped by the foremost task of the nation - economic development. The previous welfare model of kindergarten, which was regarded as one of the outcomes of a socialist system, is being transformed into a new market competitive model to meet a political demand for the marketisation of society. The curricula of early educational program, teachers' attitudes to children, and their professional activities, therefore, have been re-shaped according to new ideas about the needs and abilities of children, new conceptions of child development and, not least, the new modernisation "knowledge" that gained ascendancy in China during the 1990s.

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    Modernisation and marketisation
  • 12.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Muntlig examination och kommunikation inom nätutbildnin2015In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 30-31Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Parental involvement through Web-based Learning Management System (LMS) - experiences and lessons2016In: Unequalising World – Equalising School?, Turku, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Spring 2015, a new web-based Learning Management System “Learning Room (LR)” was implemented in all public schools in one municipality located in the north part of Sweden. To evaluate the implementation process, as well as to investigate teachers’ experiences of application of LR, an online survey questionnaire was sent anonymously to all grade 1-12 teachers in March 2016. The purpose of this paper was to describe and discuss the teachers’ (N=454) experiences and perceptions regarding the use of LR in communicating and interacting with parents. The result indicated that the majority of teachers had negative experiences of some features in the system, which prevented the opportunities for their own and parental use of the system. This had caused the decrease of school-home communications in practices. However, it was too early to make a simple conclusion that the implementation of LR was totally failed. Implementation of a new educational technology is a complex process. A successful implementation of technologies in education calls for policy commitment, quality features of the technical design, sufficient organizational support and positive personal attitudes and efforts.

  • 14.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Practical ICT and media skills (PIM): an Internet-based tool for teachers in Swedish schools2010In: 17th International Conference on Learning, 6-9 July 2010 in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Practices and perceptions on school-family relationship in Chinese lower secondary school2014In: NERA 42nd Congress, March 5-7, 2014, Lillehammer, Norway, Lillehammer, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents part of the findings from a research project regarding home-school relationship in Swedish and Chinese lower secondary school. The project aims to explore, compare and analyze how formal and informal cooperation between home and school are conducted in different system contexts, and how students, parents and teachers experience and perceive parental involvement in education and in their children’s schooling. A comparative perspective implies the analysis of varieties and similarities, as well as best practices of home–school partnership in trans-national contexts, which could contribute to cross-cultural generalizability of knowledge in this filed.

    In this paper, part of the empirical data collected in Chinese schools is described and analyzed, which consists of  interviews with class teachers (n=8), school leaders (n=4) and IT administrator (n=1) from three lower secondary schools with diverse school cultures in terms of geographic location, organizational structure and students’ family background. The major finding indicates that despite differences in school culture, formal home-school cooperation is similarly organized in all three schools, and the new information technologies are effectively used in communicating with the parents. Dissimilarities are found regarding the forms and content of informal communication with parents, the relationships between parents and teachers, and the teachers’ expectations and attitudes towards parental involvement. The elite schools, where the majority of parents are well educated, utilize various channels to encourage parents’ participation in school activities. The parents are described as “understanding”, “active”, “engaged” and “supportive” in cooperating with the school. The rural school, where the majority of students come from farmers’ and migrant workers’ families, works rather passively with parental involvement. The parents display a sort of resignation from school business due to limited social capital and lack of cultural and economic capital (Bourdieu, 1993). This study underpins the importance of school social structure for home-school partnership. The concept of institutional habitus (Reay, 1998; Reay, David & Ball, 2001; Reay, David & Ball, 2005) enables us to understand how educational practice in general, and the relationship with the families in particular, are shaped by the school’s specific historical, cultural and economic conditions, and its pedagogical premiss.

  • 16.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Prepare teachers with the competencies needed for home-school cooperation: a literature review2018In: NERA 2018 – 46th CONGRESS, Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges, Olso, 2018, p. 384-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research reveals the importance of teachers' attitudes and initiatives in the work of home school collaboration (Erikson, 2009). It is also argued that there are barriers to home-school cooperation due to shortcomings in teachers' invitations to families and strategies for involving parents in education (Hasey, 2005). These indicate a correlation between teachers’ competencies and the outcomes of home-school cooperation. This paper aims to provide a literature review on teachers’ competencies demanded for implementing and improving home-school cooperation, to identify the knowledge gaps in this field, and to discuss the policy and practical implications for teacher preparation. The research questions are: a) What teachers’ competencies are regarded as crucial for cooperating with parents? B) Do teachers have the competencies needed for home-school cooperation? C) How teacher education prepares teachers in accordance with these demands? Twenty three (N=23) educational research articles published during last 10 years (2007-2017) are selected through a systematical search of scholarly peer-reviewed full texts (Eriksson Barajas, Forsberg & Wensström, 2013) on two online databases “Academic Search Elite” and “Education Resources Information Center” (Eric), as well as a thematically higher relevant research journal International Journal about Parents in Education. The articles are analyzed by using qualitative data analysis computer software Nvivo. The analysis of data is based on the conceptual model of “overlapping spheres” of influence of family, school and community by Epstein (2010), and teachers’ collective and individual competencies necessary for parental involvement identified by Westergård (2013). The preliminary results support the assumption of teacher competencesthat imply a wider and systemic view of teacher professionalism on multiple levels –the individual, the school, the local community, and professional networks (OECD, 2009). Within the framework of relational, communication and context competence (Westergård, 2013), teachers’ competencies such as teacher leadership, capacity to change, positive and trust relationships with parents, interpersonal capacity, digital competence, reflectiveness and culturally sensitiveness are highlighted. The results also showa general picture of deficiencies in teachers’ competencies related to cooperation with parents. These results indicate the need of improving teacher education with more attention to the topic and the manner in which this topic is being addressed in the program. Moreover, home-school cooperation should not be isolated subject in teacher training but should be embedded in general conceptions about teaching and learning and teacher identity throughout teacher training program. This literature review is expected to deal with the knowledge gaps within the research field in the Nordic context.

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  • 17.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    School websites as platform for home-school communication and parental involvement?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General description on research questions, objectives and theoretical framework

    Parental involvement in education and home-school collaboration have been given increased emphasis during the last decades. Previous research has provided evidence of the positive correlations between parents’ active engagement in their children’s schooling and better outcomes and behavior of their children in school (Cooper et al., 2006; Epstein, 2001; Erikson, 2009; Högdin, 2006; Ravn, 2005). They find that parental involvement has a positive effect in that children take more pleasure in school activities, and that a more positive climate results in the classroom with a high level of interest and approval of work done by the school work. Better academic results are achieved when there are open channels between home and school.In Sweden, like many other countries, parents are regarded as having an important role as resource persons in school as stated in national educational policies (Lpo 94, 1994; Lgr 11, 2011). Since the last decade, the traditional family-school relationship characterized by separated responsibility between school and home, and teacher’s authority in this relationship are emphasized, has been challenged through the shift from a macro democracy to a more micro democracy, in which “partnership”, “user influence”, and “choice” are the main principles for structuring and managing school and family relationship, as well as changing the role of both teachers and parents (Eriksson, 2011, 2012). However, research in this field has mainly stressed parents’ right and opportunity to choose school for their children they prefer and the consequences brought about by this. Studies of how school understands and deals with the new conditions for relationship with family, and what strategies school applied in practice are scarce.Access to meaningful and effective communication between home and school enhances home-school relationship and collaboration as well as parental involvement and influence. The utilization of technologies through the use of Internet for information to and communication with parents is growing rapidly as an additional means for school-home relationship. Nowadays almost all Swedish schools have own websites that serve as prime locations for public advocacy and communications, including for parental use. It will be interested to find out what and how information is presented by local school actors on their websites, which in some way reflects their understanding of and attitudes towards relationship with parents and opportunities for parental influence. Moreover, parents are not a homogenous group, their accessibility to web-based information and communication and their ability to utilize the resources are influenced by their social, cultural and economic circumstances that could be a challenge for home-school relationship in terms of issues such as inclusion and exclusion (David, 2003; Ravn, 2005). The purpose of the study is to explore, describe, and compare the content and design of the schools' websites to identify and analyze how schools inform and communicate with parents and to deal with parental involvement through the use of their websites. The research questions are:

    -          What information is presented on school websites and what is the intended parental use of the information?

    -          How and to what extent the school websites provide the parents with the opportunities for two-way communications and possibilities of actual parental influences?

    -          How schools relate to different parental groups in terms of cultural and educational backgrounds regarding accessibility and usability?

    The framework containing six important factors with regards to parental involvement (i.e. parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision-making and collaborating with community) developed by Epstein (2009) is used as theoretical basis to examine and analyze school web settings and their strategies for working with school-home relationship.

    Methods/methodology To explore how school websites are conducted and used to inform and communicate with parents, websites of 12 schools from four municipalities are selected to be analyzed during autumn 2015 and spring 2016. The municipalities are geographically located in north, south, east and west of Sweden respectively. Three K-9 schools, in which two are public schools and one is independent school, are strategically selected from each municipality regarding representative contextual factors such as school size, proportion of students with foreign background, as well as parents’ educational levels (Database Siris, Skolverket, 2014).Because each school website consists of dozens to hundreds pages, to analyze all pages was not possible and not necessary neither. At the first step, I studied the main site of each school as a whole and considered the relevance of information and communication for parental use, which is the focus of the study. At the second step, the relevant pages (sub-pages) were selected and saved by using a free software program “Local Website Archive Lite”. The changing content of a webpage could be problematic for data collection in terms of stability of the data, this program enables to download and save the websites to the local hard drive for later reading, coding and analysis. In the analysis process, content analysis approach was applied to study and gain insights into website-establishers’/owners’ intensions and preferences as well as into political, social and communicational trends and patterns generated by them (Schreier, 2012). Content analysis enables the analysis to be structured through coding in relation to the research questions and to make replicable and valid inferences from data to their context (Bryman, 2012; Krippendorff, 1980). In this study, the step model of category development suggested by Mayring (2000) was adapted. Four determinants (variables) of the content and design of websites were measured in relation to parental use: transparency/information, interactivity, accessibility and usability (Parajuli, 2007). At later step of the analysis process, the theoretical framework was integrated to gain an understanding of the empirical data and through this to capture and/or change perceptions on the study objectives (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005)               

    Expected outcomes/results This is an ongoing study because the analysis process has not been completed yet. The results presented below is rather preliminary.There are quite large differences between schools' websites in terms of the scope and type of information and the graphical design features. Some schools give the opportunity to click through to a lot of sub-pages with more detailed information and explanations, while other schools have very sparse information, often with a few lines of text. Another impression from the primary analysis is that many schools prefer to provide parents with more information about how schools work with the students' health, mood and their social development (e. g. lunch menu and intern working group for student health) than information and knowledge related to school academic work (e. g. lesson schedules, syllabuses, the descriptions of pedagogy, as well as mother tongue instructions and homework etc.). It seems that the schools’ expectations and trust for parental involvement in schooling is limited in the social aspects of student development rather than pedagogical issues regarding teaching and learning.

    About half of schools provide information about the parents' council or other types of parental organization. Only few schools have web media such as feedback/commends feature, chat room or other two-way communication and interactive channels. This might be an evidence of the obstacles for real parents' influence on education and opportunity for parental involvement in decision-making.

    Some schools use multimedia functions with mix of texts, audio, pictures and videos, while other schools mainly use texts on their homepages. Only few schools provide options for other languages, while most of schools use only Swedish on their websites. These features could be related to the accessibility and availability of parents with immigrant backgrounds who have difficulty with the Swedish language – the issue of inclusion and exclusion. 

     

  • 18.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ view of parents’ involvement in homework2015In: ERNAPE arctic 2015: Schools, Parents and Communities – Building New Futures Through Research and Innovation, European Research Network About Parents in Education and UiT The Arctic University of Norway , 2015, p. 35-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on parental involvement in homework and its effects have recently been addressed. Some studies support a significantly positivecorrelation between parents’ involvement in the homework process and students’ homework  experiences, attitudes, behaviors and outcomes (Dumont et al, 2012; Patall, Cooper & Robinson, 2008; Pomerantz, Moorman & Litwack  2007; Pomerantz, Ng & Wang , 2006; Van Voorhis, 2003, 2011a, 2011b). Other research illustrates the negative impact of parental involvement such as family stress and conflict, as well as unequal schooling with increased gaps among students based on their family backgrounds in terms of class, gender, ethnicity, and parents’ educational level differences(Forsberg, 2007; Symeou, 2013; Van Voorhis; 2011a). In Sweden, parental involvement in homework has been an overlooked research topic. The purpose of this study is to explore and gain understanding of the Swedish teachers' views and experiences regarding parental involvement in homework.The research questions are: 1) How do teachers perceive parental involvement in homework practice? 2) What are teachers’ expectations for parents' role and responsibility in relation to homework? 3) What are teachers' views on the benefits and challenges regarding parental homework involvement? Data were collected through an online survey answered by 201 lower secondary school teachers (N = 201) and nine semi-structured teacher interviews (N = 9). The results reveal that although the majority of teachers have higher expectations for parental involvement and support in homework, they realize that it is difficult to be implemented in reality. Lack of time, knowledge, and competence to help students with their homework, and the emerging family conflicts caused by parental authoritative governance and interference are assumed as the main reasons. Teachers appreciate more parents’ mental and structural support than academic support. The findings highlight the need for re-conceptualization of parental homework involvement to understand the multi-dimensions of “involvement”. It also calls for teachers' reflection on homework design aiming to facilitate and enable parents to be positively engaged in homework.

  • 19.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Using school websites for home: school communication and parental involvement?2017In: Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, ISSN 2002-0317, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 133-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a small-scale study on the websites of 12 K-9 schools from four municipalities in Sweden. The purpose of the study is to explore, describe, and compare what and how information relevant for parental use is presented by local schools on their websites, which reflect the schools’ perceptions, intentions and strategies of communicating and cooperating with families. Epstein’s six key components regarding parental involvement are used as a theoretical framework in order to examine and analyse the content of school website settings. To evaluate the website design features, the website evaluation metrics suggested by Parajuli are adapted and applied. The results indicate that information on school websites for parental use is generally limited. It seems that schools’ expectations for parental involvement in education are based mainly on the social aspects of student development, rather than on pedagogical issues. In general, the websites of independent schools are more attractive than most public schools’ websites in terms of information richness and freshness, variations and friendliness. There is a need to develop websites that are more accessible for parents with immigrant backgrounds and non-Swedish speakers.

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  • 20.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chen, Jing
    Children’s Palace of China Welfare Institute, China.
    Li, Jiacheng
    Institute of Schooling Reform and Development, East China Normal University, China.
    The Leadership of Banzhuren in Chinese School: based on the sample survey in Changzhou City of China2015In: Journal of Education and Human Development, ISSN 2334-296X, E-ISSN 2334-2978, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 102-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The leadership quality of teachers is highlighted by researchers both in China and internationally. Banzhuren, a very particular category of teacher in Chinese schools, is the leader of teachers and the key person responsible for developing the whole community of students by classrooming. In Chinese schools, the leadership quality of banzhuren is also highly demanded. This study aims to explore and describe the characteristics of leadership of banzhurens in Chinese schools by investigating and comparing teachers’ and students’ experiences and perceptions regarding the banzhuren’s work. Empirical data were collected using teacher and student surveys in the form of a questionnaire in 10 schools in Changzhou city. The results indicate that the majority of banzhurens have a direct and positive influence on students’ everyday lives and good relationships with other adults. However, communication between the banzhuren and students and training of student leaders need to be improved. Banzhurens’ leadership and their work are integrated and comprehensive. The leadership of the banzhuren is a long-term construction that calls for strategies to develop and cultivate banzhuren leadership.

  • 21.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ivarson-Jansson, Ewa
    Reflection and professional learning2004In: The conference of Association for Teacher Education in Europe, 2004, 24-27 October, Agrigento, Italy, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ivarson-Jansson, Ewa
    Teachers’ reflective learning through action research2005In: The 1st International Conference on School Effectiveness and School Improvement in China, Shenyang Normal University, 2005, 23-25 September, Shenyang, China, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Jiao, Jianli
    South China Normal University, Guangdong, China.
    Wang, Xiaodong
    South China Normal University, Guangdong, China.
    Jia, Yimin
    South China Normal University, Guangdong, China.
    Qin, Dan
    Tangshan Teachers’ College, Tangshan, China.
    Lindberg, J. Ola
    Mid Sweden University, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Case Studies on the Use of Technology in TPD (Teacher Professional Development)2012In: US-China Education Review. A, ISSN 2161-623X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 278-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the progress of a three-year cooperative project investigating the current state of TPD (teacher professional development) in Sweden and China in the area of TPD and ICT (information and communication technologies) is summarized. A brief introduction to the field of TPD is given, and thereafter, ICT is related to what in the project is referred to as TETPD (Technology Enhanced Teacher Professional Development). Thereafter, the project as such is given a short presentation, followed by findings regarding policies and initiatives related to TETPD in Sweden and China for investigating the current state of TETPD in each country respectively. The framework for investigating TETPD is presented, and four Chinese and four Swedish cases are compared to some facets showing differences in models for TETPD in the two countries.

  • 24.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hemma blir som skola: elevperspektiv på hemläxor2010In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 4, p. 50-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidigare forskning har visat att det finns positiva samband mellan föräldrars aktiva engagemang i elevers skolarbete, skolprestationer samt skolbeteende. Inom detta forskningsfält är hemläxor ett område man fokuserar på för att närmare studera föräldrars involvering i sina barns skolgång. Denna studie inriktar sig på att belysa hur elever själva upplever att göra hemläxor och hur de ser på föräldrars involvering och stöd med hemläxor. Det centrala perspektivet i denna studie är att barn ska ses som medskapare och värda att lyssna till i den sociala kontexten som barnet verkar i. Dataunderlaget består av en enkätundersökning och fem gruppintervjuer med elever i år sex från fem kommunala grundskolor i en Norrländsk stad. Resultatet visar på att de flesta elever upplever att deras föräldrar brukar kontrollera och hjälpa till med hemläxor men eleverna saknar motivation till att göra hemläxor, beroende på att uppgifter som ges i hemläxor många gånger saknar utmaningar som utgår från deras individuella förutsättningar. Om skolan ska lyckas med att involvera föräldrar i skolarbete via hemläxor ställs skolan inför en viktig utmaning när det gäller vad, hur och varför hemläxor ges.

  • 25.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Homework conceptions and practices in Chinese and Swedish schools: A comparative study of educational efforts, quality and equity2013In: Families, Schools and Communities: learn from the past, review the present, prepare for a future with equity / [ed] Villas-Boas, M.A., Marques, R. & Silva, P., 2013, p. 69-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the ideas and design of a joint research project between Umeå University in Sweden and Zhejiang University in China. The overall aim is to carry out a comparative study of homework conceptions and homework practice at lower secondary school in Sweden and China. The project will last for four years, and consists of several sub-studies comprising a combination of data collection in forms of policy analysis, questionnaire based survey and interviews with students, parents and teachers in lower secondary school in both countries, samples from Västerbottens län, Shanghai and Hangzhou. The specific objectives of the project are to investigate and analyze the status quo and characteristics of homework and/or homework load situation in both countries/regions; to identify and analyze the similarities and/or differences in the definitions, conceptions, foci, strategies, policies and perspectives on homework and homework load in different contexts; to investigate and examine models and cases of homework design and management and the best practices; and to promote communication and collaboration among Swedish and Chinese researchers and PhD students. Contextual and constructivist learning approaches are central to understand and analyze homework conceptions and practices. The expected results could provide scientific evidences on and pedagogical applications into fundamental issues concerning educational efforts, quality and equity. Through cross-cultural comparative study, the research project could analyze homework conceptions and practices in different culture and social contexts and find out common factors that contribute to appropriate homework arrangement and management and a set of best practices for guidance and thereby the promotion of students’ learning. Homework investigations and policy measures from both countries could offer valuable lessons and experiences to each other. The project could also promote a long-term cooperation in education and research, and to improve the internationalization process of both universities.

  • 26.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Homework in a world of diversity2011In: The 39th NFPF/NERA Congress in Jyväskylä, March 9-11, 2011: Rights and Education / [ed] The Faculty of Education, University of Jyväskylä, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Involving parents through homework: some critical issues out of pupils’ perspective2011In: Home, school and community: A partnership for a happy life? / [ed] M. Pieri, A. Pepe & L. Addimando, I Libri di Emil , 2011, p. 58-59Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Swedish Lower Secondary School Teachers’ Perceptions and Experiences Regarding Homework2015In: Universal Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 2332-3205, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 296-305, article id 19503671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates homework in Swedish lower secondary schools: teachers’ perceptions and experiences about it and their understanding of its potentials and challenges for students’ learning and development. Data collected through an online survey (N = 201) mixed standardized questions and open questions. Descriptive statistics and qualitative interpretive principles fueled data processing and analysis. The main result indicated that most teachers assign homework and believe it will benefit students’ learning when it addresses consolidating and reinforcing knowledge already taught and increases skills through repetition. They regard appropriation and variation of homework and feedback as important to homework activities and effects. The teachers experience uneven attitudes to and outcomes of homework among students. Most schools organize homework assistance activities to smooth out this unevenness and to improve homework completion and quality. The findings highlight the educational implications of critical reflections on the design of homework and the quality of homework assignments.

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    fulltext
  • 29.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards homework in Swedish lower secondary school2013In: NERA 41st Congress, 7-9 March 2013, Reykjavik, Iceland: School – home cooperation, Reykjavik: University of Iceland , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, there has been dramatic increase in the number of private companies in Sweden, who provide support for students’ homework. It seems that there is a need to turn to organizations and resources outside school to help students accomplishing their schoolwork. Debate on what has caused this and what impacts this may bring about has been highlighted. However, we seldom hear teachers’ voice in the debate and there is an absence of reflections and research aiming at examining and problematizing the existed homework practice in Swedish schools. This paper intends to explore teachers’ perceptions on the purpose of homework and their understanding and attitudes to critical conditions and factors that should be taken into account in design and management of homework. Constructivist learning approach is central to understand and analyze an active and contextual learning process associated with homework.  Data was collected through a Web-based survey in form of questionnaire, which contained seven themes and 28 items. 212 lower secondary school teachers from nine municipalities participated in this study. Nine in-depth personal interviews with teachers were conducted as a complement. Descriptive statistics and qualitative interpretive principle were applied in data processing and analysis. The main result indicates that the pedagogical goal of homework is valued higher than its social functions. Teachers prefer to use homework to confirm knowledge and skills that students have learnt in school. As to homework assignment, while motivation, repetition and feedback were those terms frequently mentioned by teachers, the importance of variation, appropriation, individual diversity and conditions, and collaborative learning was given less emphasis. In a more critical sense, homework has become a kind of routine in school practice lacking of a long-term pedagogical framework for design and management. In order to reach the educational goal of homework within the frame of curriculum, teachers are facing challenges to reflect over what, why and how homework can improve students’ learning and development. 

  • 30.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ perspective on homework in Swedish elementary school2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homework has long been applied and routinized within the Swedish school, although there are no demands or guidelines stated in the national curricula. In this field, there is an absence of reflections and research on if and in what way the existed homework practice in Swedish schools improves children’s learning. This paper examines the complexity of homework issue out of teachers’perspectives aiming at understanding the pedagogical application and social implications of homework supported by the contextual and constructive learning approaches. The specific empirical questions are:

    1) How do teachers perceive the purposes of homework?

    2) What are the pedagogical assumptions that support the design and management ofhomework assignment?

    3) What are teachers’ expectations and view on parents' support in homework, and what kinds ofstrategies do they use in order to promote parents’ involvement in homework to improvepupils’ learning?

    The empirical data consisted of an online questionnaire responded by 101 teachers in elementary schools from a municipality located in the northern part of Sweden, complemented with six in-depth interviews with individual teachers from the same sample group. Result revealed that teachers classified the importance of confirming knowledge and skills of children through homework higher than the improvement and development of other social aspects associated with homework. Motivation, individual diversity and condition, appropriation, repetition and feedback were those terms frequently mentioned by teachers related to questions concerning homework assignment. Teachers had high expectation on parents’ engagement and support in homework but they also reported that it was difficult to be realized in practice due to parents’ limited knowledge, competence and time, as well as other obstacles such as lack of communication concerning homework between teachers and parents. The findings from this study provided some crucial information useful for school leaders and personal in developing homework strategies and practice. Homework needs to be planed, discussed and reflected more extensively among teacher groups in school in order to enhance teaching and learning. Parents and pupils should have more opportunity to be involved in and to influence homework assignment to realize and increase the academic and social benefits with homework.

  • 31.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Johansson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology .
    Föräldraskap och barndom i institutionella sammanhang: Introduktion till temanummer2013In: Barn, ISSN 0800-1669, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 5-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kristoffersson, MargarethaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.Johansson, GunillaLuleå University of Technology .
    Hjem-skole-partnerskap i et nordisk perspektiv2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Gu, Limin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, Ola J
    Technology Enhanced Teacher Professional Development Sweden: policies, literature and recent initiatives2009In: Distance Education Journal, ISSN 1672-0008, no 4, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ivarson-Jansson, Ewa
    et al.
    Department of Education at Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    Gu, Limin
    Department of Education at Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    Reflection and professional learning: An analysis of teachers' classroom observations2006In: Thinking Classroom Journal, ISSN 1392-947Х, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Ivarson-Jansson, Ewa
    et al.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ learning2006In: Asia-Pacific Education Research Association Conference 2006, 28 – 30 November, 2006, Hong Kong, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. J., Jiao
    et al.
    Wang, X.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, J. Ola
    Tianhe Blogosphere and Lektion.se: a comparison of two online learning communities’ potential for teacher professional development2010In: 17th International Conference on Learning, 6-9 July 2010 in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kristoffersson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Zhang, Yan
    Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Home-School Collaboration in Sweden and China2013In: US-China Education Review B, ISSN 2161-6248, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a working paper presenting a network building cooperative project between Umeå University inSweden and Zhejiang University in China. The project focuses on parents’ involvement and home-schoolcollaboration in Sweden and China and has an ambition to entail a set of empirical objectives: (1) to map andcompare the systems, policies, curricula, and resources dealing with home-school collaboration in Sweden andChina at the national level; (2) to identify and analyze the similarities and differences in the definitions, foci,models, practices, and perspectives on home-school collaboration in the two countries at the local level; and (3) toidentify and seek out good examples and models from both countries for communication and interaction amongteachers, parents, and students. Following an introduction to the project design where a comparative case-studyapproach is presented, this article reviews policies and researches concerning home-school collaboration inSwedish and Chinese contexts. Cases from both countries are selected, described, and discussed. Relative issues forfurther study are suggested.

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    Home-School Collaboration in Sweden and China
  • 38.
    Liljeström, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Holmgren, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Holmgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Paulin, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Råde, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Håkansson Lindqvist, Marcia
    Mid Sweden University.
    How will they react if we make them talk?: Students’ experiences from learner-created video tasks in online university education in Sweden2017In: ICICTE 2017 Proceedings: The International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education 2017 / [ed] Linda Morris and Costas Tsolakidis, Rhodes, Greece: ICICTE 2017 , 2017, p. 318-328Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In focus in this paper are students’ views on their experiences of an educational design with oral assessment tasks supported by video technology in online university education in Sweden. Questions targeted how the students perceived the impact of oral tasks on their learning. The data were gathered through questionnaires, qualitative interviews and students’ self-reflection documents. Results indicate most students appreciated the oral assessments, and their descriptions of this learning experience indicate that the studied video-based task-design may enhance online students’ learning experiences.

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    fulltext
  • 39. Lindberg, J. Ola
    et al.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The case of Lektion.se: a Swedish online learning community for teachers’ professional development?2010In: 17th International Conference on Learning, 6-9 July 2010 in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40. Lindberg, J Ola
    et al.
    Limin, Gu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Technology enhanced teacher professional development (TETPD) in Sweden2008In: Asia-Pacific education research association conference, 2008, 26-28 november, Singapore, Singapore: National Institute of Education Singapore , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Lindberg, Ola J
    et al.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    ICT and Teacher Professional Development: Four Swedish Cases and the Theoretical Framework2009In: Distance Education Journal, ISSN 1672-0008, no 3, p. 24-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, J Ola
    Mittuniversitetet, Härnösand.
    Jianli, Jiao
    South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.
    Gu, Limin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Editorial2013In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 595-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen the increased use of digital technologies for educational activities at all levels of the education system (Jopling, 2012). The one-to-one initiative (also called the 1:1 initiative), referring to one digital device per student (Penuel, 2006), is widespread in many parts of the Western world (see, for example, Bebell & O’Dwyer, 2010; Fleischer, 2012), with the Nordic countries being no exception (Kroksmark, 2011; JRC, 2013). On a policy level, digital technologies are said to influence teaching and learning (OECD, 2009) and to embody the potential to both improve and change activities in school settings (European Commission, 2008). This optimistic yet also naïve understanding of digital technologies in schools expressed on the policy level represents a challenge.

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    fulltext
  • 43.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, J. OlaMittuniversitetet, Härnösand.Jianli, JiaoSouth China Normal University Guangzhou, China.Gu, LiminUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Educational Inquiry2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 43 of 43
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