umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Stoor, Jon Petter A.
    et al.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Silviken, Anne
    "We are like lemmings'': making sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 74, article id 27669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s) of suicide.

    Objective. To explore and make sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among Sami in Sweden.

    Design. Open-ended focus group discussions (FGDs) on the topic "suicide among Sami'' were carried out in 5 Sami communities in Sweden, with in total 22 strategically selected Sami participants. FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed through employing content analysis.

    Results. From the FGDs 4 themes emerged including "The Sami are fighting for their culture and the herders are in the middle of the fight,'' "Suicide as a consequence of Sami losing (or having lost) their identity,'' "A wildfire in the Sami world'' and "Difficult to get help as a Sami.''

    Conclusions. Findings indicate that Sami in Sweden make sense of suicide in relation to power and identity within a threatened Sami cultural context. Suicide is then understood as an act that takes place and makes sense to others when a Sami no longer has the power to maintain a Sami identity, resulting in being disconnected from the Sami world and placed in an existential void where suicide is a solution. The findings are useful in development of culturally attuned suicide prevention among Sami in Sweden.

  • 2.
    Stoor, Jon Petter Anders
    Sametinget.
    Kunskapssammanställning om psykosocial ohälsa bland samer2016Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Stoor, Jon Petter Anders
    Samisk nasjonal kompetansetjeneste - psykisk helsevern og rus, Finnmarkssykehuset HF.
    Varför söker svenska samer vård i Norge?: om kultur och kontext i samisk psykiatri2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, no 1, p. 26-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sámi is the indigenous people of northern Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula.The health of the Swedish Sámi is generally good, but problems with mental ill-health and suicide has increased in later years, especially among the men, as is also the case among other indigenous peoples in the Arctic. The article sheds light on different perspectives on culture and context that might be of relevance for how Swedish Sámi perceives psychiatric care, and why some travel to Norway, where (Sámi) culture sensitivity is integrated in care. The dimension of power is central for understanding both these problems and why Sweden is not taking action on the proposals for improvement that has been suggested by the United Nations.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf