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  • 1.
    Bodén, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lidström, Mattias
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Point or click?: Evaluating two input modalities for mobile games2007In: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in computer games have focused on user experience from the perspectives of game content, graphics, interactivity and underling game story while missing to address the effect of a certain input modality on the user experience. In this paper we report from two user studies that focus on players' experience and performance in relation to the use of two different input modalities for the same game and whether it changes the flow and gameplay in any way. The overall research was according to this whether a game can be more fun to play with a certain input modality? The paper presents the results from these studies and draws conclusions based on these data in relation to computer games and user experiences in the context of mobile game playing.

  • 2.
    Bodén, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    iBalance - a cross-media service platform2007In: CMID'07 / [ed] Wiberg, C. & Wiberg M., 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Participatory Design of learning media: designing educational computer games with and for teenagers2006In: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, ISSN 1741-5659, E-ISSN 1758-8510, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 275-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on how prospective users may be involved in the design of entertaining educational computer games. The paper illustrates an approach, which combines traditional Participatory Design methods in an applicable way for this type of design. Results illuminate the users’ important contribution during game development, especially when intended for a specific target group. Unless prospective members of the target group are consulted it is difficult to foresee opinions of game content, aesthetics and the overall game experience of the users – aspects very much included or at least related to the theoretical concept of intrinsic motivation. Whereas pedagogical experts can contribute with learning content, the users are the ones who can state what is actually fun or not. Users’ participation during the design process enables development of games that are directed to the learners and their expectations. The researchers collaborated with a multimedia design team in development of an educational web-based computer game, developed for the Swedish Broadcasting Corporation.

  • 4.
    Desurivre, Heather
    et al.
    Cinematic Arts, Game Studies Playability/Usability Specialist, Marina del Rey, CA 90292 USA.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Game Usability Heuristics (PLAY) For Evaluating and Designing Better Games: the Next Iteration2009In: Online communities and social computing: third international conference, OCSC 2009, held as part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009 : proceedings / [ed] A Ant Ozok; Panayiotis Zaphiris, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 557-566Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Developing A Conceptual Framework for Analysis and Design of Evaluation Methods2007In: INTERACT'07: Facing Emotions: Responsible experiential design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Behavioristics, Inc. Marina Del Rey, CA 90292.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Evaluating fun and entertainment: Developing a conceptual framework design of evaluation methods2007In: INTERACT'07: Facing Emotions: Responsible experiential design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach to analyze and re-design evaluation methods. The domain explored in thispaper is evaluation methods for evaluating fun and entertainment. However, the approach presented may be appliedin other domains as well. The approach is conceptually described and two examples of processes where the approachwere used in practice are further discussed. As the map of IT applications and digital media is continuously redesigned,there is a constant need of re-designing evaluation methods.

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  • 7.
    Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Usability/Playability Specialist, Behavioristics, Venice, California USA.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Evaluating user experience and other lies in evaluating games2008In: CHI'08: Workshop on Evaluating User Experiences in Games, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Marina del Rey, CA 90292 USA.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. charlotte.wiberg@informatik.umu.se.
    Game usability heuristics (PLAY) for evaluating and designing better games: the next iteration2009In: Online Communities and Social Computing, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 557-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game developers have begun applying formal human-computer interaction (HCI) principles in design. Desurvire et al [2] adapted a set of Heuristics for productivity software to games. The resulting set, presented at CHI 2004, was Heuristics to Evaluate Playability (HEP). Generalization of these heuristics is required to make them applicable to a multiple of game genres and game deliveries. This follow-up study focused on the refined list, Heuristics of Playability (PLAY), that can be applied earlier in game development as well as aiding developers between formal usability/playability research during the development cycle. Heuristics were formed based on their efficacious scores on the popular game review website, metacritic.com. Fiftyfour gamers rated High and Low ranked games on 116 potential heuristics. Implications for how these Heuristics will help developers improve game quality are discussed. PLAY has been found useful in design evaluation and elfreport survey format.

  • 9. Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Master of the Game: The Crusial Role of Accessibility in Future Game Design2007In: CMID'07: The first international conference on crossmedia interaction design., 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Desurvire, Heather
    et al.
    Behavioristics Inc., Marina del Rey, CA, USA.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    User Experience Design for Inexperienced Gamers: GAP - Game Approachability Principles2010In: Evaluating User Experience in Games: Concepts and Methods / [ed] Regina Bernhaupt, London: Springer London, 2010, p. 131-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Game Approachability Principles (GAP) is proposed as a set of useful guidelines for game designers to create better tutorials and first learning levels especially for the casual gamer. Developing better first learning levels can be a key step to ease the casual garner into play proactively - at the conceptual design phase before it is too costly or cumbersome to restructure the tutorials, as would be the case later in the development cycle. Thus, Game Approachability, in the context of game development, is defined as making games initially more friendly, fun, and accessible for those players who have the desire to play, yet do not always follow through to actually playing the game. GAP has evolved through a series of stages assessing accessibility(1) as a stand-alone, heuristic-based approach versus one-on-one usability testing. Outcomes suggest potential for GAP as (I) effective Heuristic Evaluation, (2) adjunct to Usability Testing, and (3) proactive checklist of principles in beginning conceptual and first learning level tutorial design to increase Game Approachability for all levels of garners.

  • 11.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sports IT: Digital media and technology for encouraging physical activity2016In: International Journal of Emerging Technology and Innovative Engineering, ISSN 2394-6598, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport IT is an emerging global movement. Many research efforts have addressed the potential of IT for promoting physical activity, a countermeasure against the factors that cause welfare problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. This paper presents an overview of research related to IT and physical activity and identifies three reoccurring themes; 1) Measurement and latforms, 2) Support for opportunistic individual training and finally, 3) Encouragement through Toys and Games. These themes or chategories of Sports IT, are furher explored in a detailed and systematic way. This is wrapped up in a discussion of what could be seen as impotant further research addressing the issues found in this body of research.

  • 12. Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Early USer Centered Play testing of Game Concepts for Pervasive Games2006In: CHI'06: Player Centered Design Workshop, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    FunTain: Design Implications for Edutainment Games2003In: Ed-Media'03: World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications (Ed-Media), Chesapeake, VA, AACE, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report on the initial findings of a study conducted in the project FunTain with the main purpose to find general guidelines for edutainment games. This to guide designers of such games, as they often lack in design guidelines. Usability evaluations were conducted on the edutainment game in order to find usability problems. These findings were then analyzed and used as input in focus group meetings, held with joint teams with game designers and HCI experts. The result was a proposal of a list of ten general design guidelines. Findings indicate that users had problems in understanding the underlying model for the game as well as finding the knowledge related content. Experts, further, gave comments about feedback problems and different types of consistencies. Some of the implications from the findings, as discussed in focus group, are guidelines for earning and loosing points, scoring and performance feedback and game object characteristics.

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  • 14. Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Learning While Playing: Design Implications for Edutainment Games2004In: The Interaction Society: Practice, Theories and Supportive Technologies / [ed] Mikael Wiberg, IGI Global, 2004, p. 122-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Pervasive gaming meets CSCW: Continuity, Collaboration & Context2005In: "Computer games & CSCW" workshop at the 9th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW ´05), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Olsson, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The usability concept re-considered: A need for new ways of measuring real web use2000In: IRIS23: Informations systems Research seminar In Scandinavia, Doing IT Together., 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usability is a common term used in discussions of WWW (World Wide Web). This is definitely important, as more and more web sites are frequently visited and many people claim the web as an important building block for the new economy or the network economy.

    However, the argument of this paper is that research so far have missed out important aspects of usability since their models for evaluation of web sites are based on traditionally usability concepts not optimized for web surfing but rather for measuring efficiency on tasks such as information search in traditional GUIs.

    This paper outline the framework used so far in research and practice to measure web usability and then, by illustrating how the "use" of the web sometimes is more then just information search it extends the traditional framework as a proposal for a more successful framework to measure real web usability.

    The paper concludes that there is a need to extend current frameworks for measuring web usability as well as it point out the importance of future research into the area of measuring how people actually are using web sites.

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  • 17.
    Rolandsson, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Density of Events Model (DEMO): Exploring density and temporality as key aspects of experiences in events2015In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology, ISSN 3159-0040, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 3327-3333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of IT and digital media changes the notion of experience in relation to events. This paper presents a study of event experiences, and in this case a specific type of events, i.e. academic ceremonies. Based on the results of the study, it is shown that earlier theoretical models does not include the use of IT and digital media in relation to events in order to explain the dimensions found. The Density of Events Model (DEMO) is developed and further explained. Finally, a discussion about usage of the model as well as proposal of future work is made.

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  • 18.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Affective computing vs. usability ?: Insights of using traditional usability evaluation methods2005In: CHI 2005: Workshop on Innovative Approaches to Evaluating Affective Interfaces, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating affective interfaces in order to provide input for designers is a challenge for the CHI community. One question is to what extent traditional evaluation methods, used for evaluating traditional usability, are applicable at all, and if they need revision. The purpose of this project was to gain an understanding in how applicable traditional usability evaluation methods are in understanding people’s experiences of affective systems, in this case Entertainment web sites. Empirical techniques as well as inspection methods were used on a number of web sites. The results show that the methods are applicable but need revision. When it comes to the development of inspection methods, the challenges include finding proper heuristics to support the experts in using Heuristic Evaluation, providing conditions for experts which bridge the gap between evaluation and authentic use, developing complementary methods for use in combination with existing methods etc. In empirical evaluation of entertainment in the context of web usability, the most crucial aspect might be to consider how to arrange a setting that is as natural and authentic as possible when evaluating fun, as this seems to be important for the results. Overall, the results of the study clearly show that important aspects of affective interfaces can be

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  • 19.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bridging the gap between designers and ethnographers by using a facilitator2001In: The social production of technology: on everyday life with things / [ed] Hans Glimell & Oskar Juhlin, Göteborg: Bokförlaget BAS, 2001, p. 59-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From Ease of Use to Fun of Use: usability Evaluation Guidelines for Entertainment Web sites2001In: Proceedings on the International Conference on Affective Human Factors Design, 27-29 June 2001, Singapore / [ed] Martin G. Helander ; Halimahtun M. Khalid ; Tham Ming Po, London: Asean Academic Press , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fun in the home: Guidelines for evaluating interactive entertainment on the web2005In: HCI International: 12th international conference on Human Computer Interaction., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, we have witnessed a dramatic change in how ICT (Information- and Communication Technologies) is used, and examples of usage of ICT are allocation of leisure time, learning, man-to-man communication, e-shopping and much more (Bradley, 2001). Today, the computer has moved to the kitchen, the living room, and even the garage, to support the activities going on there – food recipes are browsed from the kitchen and in the living room a TV-show is displaying supporting web sites for chatting, presentation of further information, voting, etc. Children have PC’s, on which they communicate with others, play games, search the web and so on. Because of this change in usage of ICT, the focus of design concerns has expanded from predominantly functional aspects of ICT systems to overall user experience. The trend towards experience has direct implications for usability evaluation. Since experience is considered an important aspect of the quality of various products, it should be evaluated. One possible, if not universally accepted, approach is to consider evaluation of experience as a case of usability evaluation. However, the existing methods cannot be employed. When the focus is on experiences rather than on more functional aspects of systems, a revision of usability methods is required. This paper presents a novel approach in how to conduct Heuristic Evaluations (Nielsen, 1993) on ICT mediating interactive entertainment. New heuristics, so called funology heuristics, were developed and empirically tested on, what is called, entertainment web sites. These funology heuristics were also combined with novel methodological approaches in order to fulfill the requirements when evaluating fun on the web.

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  • 22.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Game-inspired architecture and architecture-inspired games2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 68-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Join the Joyride!: an Identification of Three Important Factors for Evaluation of On-line Entertainment2001In: WebNet 2001: World Conference on the WWW and Internet, Orlando, Florida, October 23-27, 2001, Proceedings / [ed] Gordon Davies & Charles Owen, Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2001, p. 1333-1338Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sports IT and Digital Wellness: Three Waves of Digital Transformation in Sports and Training2018In: Human-Computer Interaction. Interaction in Context. / [ed] Kurosu M., Springer, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the recent twenty years, people have developed a close relationship with digital technology in conducting sports and training. Initially, approximately 1995–2005, the first wave of Sport IT included technology as GPS watches and pulse measurement equipment connected to rudimentary digital services, designed by the brand delivering the watch and only available for the single user’s needs. In the second wave, between years 2006–2010, APIs and platforms started to emerge, facilitating the data to flow between artefacts, services, brands and facilities. Aesthetics in information visualization and other User experience (UX) aspects become popular and the audience becomes broader. The third wave, in the interval of 2011 and forward, could be described as the maturing wave. People now become fanatic about showing results to others – in sport platforms and on general social media. Further, what symbolizes this wave is that the focus in use becomes more on hi-fi information rather than low-fi data. In the third wave, the usage is widely spread and covers a wide range of requirements from a wide range of users.

    The paper gives a more thorough description of the three waves of Sports IT when it comes to applications and user cases. A thorough description of related work for each wave is given with the main goal to pinpoint where research has given fruitful insights and contribution. In order to give a deeper understanding of the waves, one detailed example of a typical digital service of each wave is presented. Finally, the phenomenon of Sports IT and digital wellness is discussed based on findings shown earlier in the paper.

  • 25.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Transitional states: From extrinsic to intrinsic motivation by using pedagogical tools in learning2015In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2015, p. 1936-1941Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated students learn much more easily and often teachers make a large effort to motivate them. It is important to get the students to have their own motivation instead from someone else outside, i.e a transition from extrinsic to intrinsic motivation. This transition happens when the student come into transitional states. These are facilitated by, so called, transitional objects, which can be usage of pedagogical tools of different kinds. In this paper we highlight and explain the notion of transitional states and exemplifies some transitional objects.

  • 26.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Usability and fun: An overview of relevant research in the hci community2005In: CHI 2005: Workshop on Innovative Approaches to Evaluating Affective Interfaces, Portland, OR April,4, 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating affective interfaces in order to provide input for designers is a challenge for the CHI community. One question is to what extent traditional evaluation methods, used for evaluating traditional usability, are applicable at all, and if they need revision. The purpose of this project was to gain an understanding in how applicable traditional usability evaluation methods are in understanding people’s experiences of affective systems, in this case Entertainment web sites. Empirical techniques as well as inspection methods were used on a number of web sites. The results show that the methods are applicable but need revision. When it comes to the development of inspection methods, the challenges include finding proper heuristics to support the experts in using Heuristic Evaluation, providing conditions for experts which bridge the gap between evaluation and authentic use, developing complementary methods for use in combination with existing methods etc. In empirical evaluation of entertainment in the context of web usability, the most crucial aspect might be to consider how to arrange a setting that is as natural and authentic as possible when evaluating fun, as this seems to be important for the results. Overall, the results of the study clearly show that important aspects of affective interfaces can be revealed by using traditional usability evaluation methods – aspects which should be considered early in the design phase.

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  • 27.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Webbanvändning inom resesektorn2007In: Turisten i upplevelseindustrin / [ed] Hanefors, Monica & Mosserg, Lena, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Desurvire, Heather
    Master of the game: Assessing approachability in future game design2008In: CHI'08 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2008, p. 3177-3182Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Satisfaction and learnability in edutainment: A usability study of the knowledge game ‘Laser Challenge’at the Nobel e-museum2003In: HCI International: 10th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report on the initial findings of a study conducted in the project FunTain with the main purpose to find general guidelines for edutainment games, in order to guide designers of such games. Usability evaluations, with users and experts, were conducted on the edutainment game in order to find usability problems. These findings were then analyzed and used as input in focus group meetings, held with joint teams consisting of game designers and HCI experts. The result was a proposal of a list of design guidelines. In this paper they are grouped in three general categories; (1) game experience, (2) balance between entertainment and education, and (3) general understanding. Findings indicate that users had problems in understanding the underlying model for the game as well as finding the knowledge related content. Experts, further, gave comments about feedback problems and different types of inconsistencies. Some of the implications from the findings, as discussed in the focus group, were guidelines for earning and loosing points, scoring and performance feedback and game object characteristics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bodén, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Cross Media Interaction Design2007In: CHI'07: Workshop HCI and New Media Arts: Technology and Evaluation, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Desurvire, Heather
    Behavioristics, Inc. Marina Del Rey, CA 90292.
    How Applicable is Your Evaluation Methods–Really?: Analysis and Re-design of Evaluation Methods for Fun and Entertainment2009In: ACHI'09, IEEE , 2009, p. 324-328Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach to analyze and re-design evaluation methods. The domain explored in this paper is evaluation methods for evaluating fun and entertainment. However, the approach presented may be applied in other domains as well. The approach is conceptually described and two examples of processes where the approach were used in practice are further discussed. As the map of IT applications and digital media is continuously redesigned, there is a constant need of re-designing evaluation methods.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Innovating social media: five strategies for successful digital entrepreneurship2012In: Innovation through Social Media: ISM 2012, Trondheim, Norge, 2012, p. 119-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish blogosphere, a high rate of blog readers and writers is woman. It includes some real success stories, where female bloggers are well established, widely known, and successful digital entrepreneurs. The study in this paper included 20 interviews with nine female bloggers, and results show upon five strategies for successful digital entrepreneurship: Out of the closet – from peaceful anonymity to strength to bloom on stage, Understanding the essence of technology – from constraint to transparency, Strategic cooperation between blogging peers, Informal relation management: positive encouragement and mentorship for newcomers, and finally, Becoming friends with your visitors.

  • 33.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Configuring social agents2001In: HCI International: 8th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, 2001, p. 450-454Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social agents have recently been more frequently used in the user interface. However, so far not many studies have been conducted on what impact such interfaces have on users behavior. This paper discusses this and reports on empirical findings, which focus on impact of social agents on user behavior. We talk of social agents as interfaces that act autonomously but are related to the actions of the user. However, to really figure out what social impact these interfaces have on humans, we discuss what characteristics of social agents that should be possible to configure, in order to establish, maintain and develop a fruitful relation with the user. In order to do so, we needed to explore the impact for real users. The exploration of the impact of social agents such as BonzyBuddy the Parrot and Bob, the Paper-clip guy, was done empirically through observations and interviews with users. Based on empirical data collected in the study, a user-agent interaction model was constructed. The model illustrates three dimensions for configuration of social interfaces. Given the interaction model the two agents investigate are discussed followed by a discussion on what implications these observations has for design of social agents. Having identified the need for self-examining and selfadapting social agents and related problems we then conclude the paper and points at some future work.

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  • 34.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Proceedings of CMID'07: The first international Conference on Crossmedia Interaction Design2007Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Olsson, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing artifacts for context awareness1999In: Proceedings odf the 22nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 22): "Enterprise Architectures for Virtual Organisations" / [ed] Timo K. Käkölä, Jyväskylä, Finland: University of Jyväskylä, Department of computer science and information systems, Jyväskylä, Finland , 1999, Vol. 3, p. 371-380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To design support for distributed cognition is tough. A big amount of this type of systems have been designed during the years and a great number of them have failed in order to fulfill the purpose of supporting people to distribute the cognition. One reason for this may be the lack of support for the design process.

    In this article we argue that it exists a lack of theoretical framework to support these processes. We therefore try to examine two existing frameworks; Activity Theory and Distributed Cognition, in order to come up with some conclusions if, and in that case how, these two can be supportive. We also discuss likely differences in results between the two frameworks. We do this by examine the two frameworks and then we apply them to a case; an information system at a department on a hospital.

    We show upon the similarities and differences in design results and make a discussion. We finally ask ourselves whether the theories were a support for us in the design process or if an awareness of the approaches of them was enough to make a, sort of more intuitive design. If so, the theoretical frameworks, in this case, and the trouble using them, were in vain.

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    Designing artifacts for context awareness
  • 36.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide2018In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does the 3rd wave of mobile computing hold for us, and what are the challenges ahead as we now move from the 1st and 2nd wave to the 3rd wave of mobile HCI? While the 1st wave enabled mobile computing on a basic level – including basic connectivity and the development of mobile devices – and while the 2nd wave was to a large extent about the development of mobile content (from digital services and apps, to services for storing our data in the cloud), the authors suggest that the 3rd wave of mobile computing is less technology-driven, but rather about what mobile computing can enable, and how mobile computing is increasingly a gateway to society at large. In this article, the authors focus specifically on this 3rd wave of mobile computing, and in particular on what they call an inverted digital divide – a state where the mobile technology is in place for its users, but where there is no access to the services in society that rely on mobile computing. In this article, the authors demonstrate this inverted digital divide through a number of examples where they show how this plays out for different groups of people where this is vital in a global world – e.g., visitors to a country such as tourists, immigrants and even people applying for asylum. The authors discuss what is needed in order to bridge this divide and they outline its implications for the further development of mobile services. In concluding this paper, the authors suggest that “digital integration” might serve as a key notion for resolving these issues as we now enter the 3rd wave of mobile HCI.

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