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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund .
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala .
    Molin, Daniel
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala .
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Long term risk of infections in Hodgkin lymphoma long-term survivors2011In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 154, no 5, p. 661-663Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Lunds universitet.
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala universitet.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Cardiovascular side effects following treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma: comorbidity factors and a strategy for interventionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björkholm, Magnus
    Linderoth, Johan
    Lagerlöf, I
    Merup, Mats
    Sender, Mark
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Family history of cancer as a risk factor for second malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma2008In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 1001-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study estimated the risk of second primary malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in relation to family history of cancer, age at diagnosis and latency, among 6946 patients treated for HL in Sweden in 1965–1995 identified through the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR. The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed. In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis. The risk for developing SM increased with the number of FDRs with cancer, SIRs being 2.26, 3.01, and 3.45 with 0, 1, or ≥2 FDRs with cancer, respectively. Hodgkin's lymphoma long-term survivors treated at a young age with a family history of cancer carry an increased risk for developing SM and may represent a subgroup where standardised screening for the most common cancer sites could be offered in a stringent surveillance programme.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors: retrospective cohort analyses and a concept for prospective intervention2009In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 124, no 8, p. 1914-1917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown increased cardiovascular mortality as late side effects in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. This study identifies stratifying risk factors for surveillance and defines concepts for a clinical feasible and noninvasive prospective protocol for intervention of cardiovascular side effects. HL patients diagnosed between 1965 and 1995 (n = 6.946) and their first-degree relatives (FDR) were identified through the Swedish Cancer Registry and the Swedish Multigeneration Registry. For the HL and FDR cohort, in-patient care for cardiovascular disease (CVD) was registered through the Hospital Discharge Registry, Sweden. Standard incidence ratios of developing CVD for the HL cohort were calculated. A markedly increased risk for in-patient care of CVD was observed in HL patients with HL diagnosed at age 40 years or younger and with more than 10 years follow-up. In the HL survivors, a family history of congestive heart failure (CHF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) increased the risk for these diseases. The Swedish Hodgkin Intervention and Prevention study started in 2007. In the pilot feasibility study for prospective intervention (47 patients), about 25% of the cases had side effects and laboratory abnormalities. These patients were referred to a cardiologist or general practitioner. In the prospective cohort, a positive family history for CHF or CAD could be a stratifying risk factor when setting up a surveillance model. The prospective on-going study presents an intervention model that screens and treats for comorbidity factors. This article also presents an overview of the study concept.

  • 5. Davis, Faith
    et al.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grutsch, James
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Second primary tumors following a diagnosis of meningioma in Sweden, 1958-1997.2007In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 29, no 1-2, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Elmstedt, Sixten
    et al.
    Mogensen, Hanna
    Hallmans, Dan-Erik
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Lindskog, Magnus
    Cancer patients hospitalised in the last week of life risk insufficient care quality: a population-based study from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care2019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 432-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One-quarter of all cancer deaths in Sweden occur in hospitals. If the place of death affects the quality of end-of-life (EOL) is largely unknown.

    Methods: This population-based, retrospective study included all adults cancer deaths reported to the Swedish Register of Palliative Care in 2011-2013 (N = 41,729). Hospital deaths were compared to deaths occurring in general or specialised palliative care, or in nursing homes with respect to care quality indicators in the last week of life. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with specialised palliative home care as reference.

    Results: Preferred place of death was unknown for 63% of hospitalised patients and consistent with the actual place of death in 25% compared to 97% in palliative home care. Hospitalised patients were less likely to be informed when death was imminent (OR: 0.3; CI: 0.28-0.33) as were their families (OR: 0.51; CI: 0.46-0.57). Validated screening tools were less often used in hospitals for assessment of pain (OR: 0.32; CI: 0.30-0.34) or other symptoms (OR: 0.31; CI: 0.28-0.34) despite similar levels of EOL symptoms. Prescriptions of as needed drugs against anxiety (OR: 0.27; CI: 0.24-0.30), nausea (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.17-0.21), or pulmonary secretions (OR: 0.29; CI: 0.26-0.32) were less prevalent in hospitals. Bereavement support was offered after 57% of hospital deaths compared to 87-97% in palliative care units and 72% in nursing homes.

    Conclusions: Dying in hospital was associated with inferior end-of-life care quality among cancer patients in Sweden.

  • 7.
    Emilsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Support group participation during the post-operative radiotherapy period increases levels of coping resources among women with breast cancer.2012In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 591-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Support group participation during the post-operative radiotherapy period increases levels of coping resources among women with breast cancer Being diagnosed with breast cancer is a traumatic experience that can elevate levels of distress and cause depletion of coping resources in many of the disease's victims. This non-randomised case-control study among breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy indicates that participation in a support group that focuses on communication and mutual sharing between its member's has positive effects and increases levels of coping resources assessed with the Coping Resources Inventory (CRI). Results of the CRI showed a significant difference between the study group and control group in the social domain at the second occasion of measurement (P= 0.007) and in the emotional domain at the third occasion (P= 0.028). Within the study group, over time, increased levels of coping resources reached significant levels concerning the emotional domain at the second occasion (P= 0.025). Conversely, coping resources were decreased in the same domain within the control group over time, at the third occasion (P= 0.053). Additionally, anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, showing no difference between the groups. This study shows that participation in a support group during post-operative radiotherapy can be socially and emotionally strengthening because of the opportunity for the patients to mutually share experiences.

  • 8.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Reliability and responsiveness of a prostate cancer questionnaire for radiotherapy-induced side effects2001In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few self-assessment cancer-specific questionnaires / modules have yet been developed for radiotherapy-induced side effects. The aim of the present study was to test the reliability and responsiveness of a prostate cancer (PC)specific questionnaire. Thirty-one patients with PC graded their urinary and intestinal symptoms and their sexual function on the questionnaire. A doctor and a nurse performed a structured interview and graded the patient's symptoms with the same questions. The procedure was performed at both the start and the end of the treatment. A high concordance regarding symptom detection was seen between the patient, nurse and the doctor. The inter-rater test shows intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values above 0.60 in all scales. The internal reliability exceeded the lower limit (Cronbach alpha > 0.70) for all scales. The test-retest gave acceptable reliability for all scales (ICC greater than or equal to 0.60). All scales indicated increased problems during radiotherapy. The questionnaire was proven to be valid for the evaluations of urinary and intestinal problems and for sexual function in PC patients.

  • 9.
    Fritzson, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Association between parenteral fluids and symptoms in hospital end-of-life care: an observational study of 280 patients2015In: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, ISSN 2045-435X, E-ISSN 2045-4368, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 160-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether dying patients receiving parenteral fluids (PF) suffer from more or less symptoms than patients who do not receive PF. Today's evidence on how PF affects palliative patients' symptoms is very scarce. Nevertheless, 40% of the patients who die expectedly in Swedish hospitals receive PF during their last 24 h of life.

    METHODS: A historical cohort study of medical records was performed. Of the 530 patients who were reported to have died expectedly at hospital in Västerbotten county (Sweden) between 1 January 2011 and 30 June 2012, 140 cases who had received PF and 140 controls who had not received PF were identified by stratified randomisation and matched by age, sex and main disease. The groups were compared regarding documented presence of dyspnoea, respiratory secretions, anxiety, nausea and confusion during the last 24 h and the last week of life.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of documented dyspnoea in the PF groups was higher than in the non-PF groups (51% vs 22% last 24 h, p<0.0001; 70% vs 45% last 7 days, p<0.001). The proportions of patients suffering from dyspnoea increased with larger administered volume. Although our main hypothesis--that the prevalence of respiratory secretions would be higher in the PF group--was not confirmed, we found a tendency in that direction (63% vs 50% last week, p=0.072). No clinically significant differences in anxiety, nausea or confusion were found.

    CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between PF administration and increased frequency of documented dyspnoea for terminally ill patients in their last week of life.

  • 10. Försti, A
    et al.
    Lei, H
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Enquist, K
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Altieri, A
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, K
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Polymorphisms in the genes of the urokinase plasminogen activation system in relation to colorectal cancer.2007In: Ann Oncol, ISSN 0923-7534, Vol. 18, p. 1990-1994Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Försti, Asta
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Li, Xuchen
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Wagner, Kerstin
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Altieri, Andrea
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Polymorphisms in the transforming growth factor beta 1 pathway in relation to colorectal cancer progression2010In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 270-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFB1) acts as a growth inhibitor of normal colonic epithelial cells, however, as a tumor promoter of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms in the TGFB1 pathway and CRC susceptibility and clinical outcome, we carried out a case-control study on a Swedish population of 308 CRC cases and 585 age- and gender-matched controls. The cases were sampled prospectively and had up to 16 years follow-up, making the study material particularly suitable for survival analysis. On the basis of their reported or predicted functional effect, nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TGFB1: Leu10Pro; TGFBR1: 9A/6A and IVS7G+24A; FURIN: C-229T; THBS1: T+42C; LTBP1L: C-256G; LTBP4: T-893G and Thr750Ala; BAMBI: T-779A) were selected for genotyping. We evaluated the associations between genotypes and CRC and Dukes' stage. Survival probabilities were compared between different subgroups. The observed statistically significant associations included a decreased CRC risk for TGFBR1 IVS7G+24A minor allele carriers (odds ratio (OR): 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.97), less aggressive tumors with Dukes' stage A+B for carriers of LTBP4 Thr750Ala and BAMBI T-779A minor alleles (OR: 0.58, 95%CI: 0.36-0.93 and OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.29-0.89, respectively) and worse survival for FURIN C-229T heterozygotes (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95%CI: 1.08-2.46). As this is the first study about the influence of the polymorphisms in the TGFB1 pathway on CRC progression, further studies in large independent cohorts are warranted.

  • 12.
    Kjellberg, Lennart
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    'See and treat' regime by LEEP conisation is a safe and time saving procedure among women with cytological high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.2007In: Acta Obstestricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 86, no 9, p. 1140-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kohler, Corina
    et al.
    Laboratory for Gynecological Oncology, Women’s Hospital/Department Research, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Fan, Alex Xiu-Cheng
    Laboratory for Gynecological Oncology, Women’s Hospital/Department Research, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Radpour, Ramin
    Laboratory for Gynecological Oncology, Women’s Hospital/Department Research, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Barekati, Zeinab
    Laboratory for Gynecological Oncology, Women’s Hospital/Department Research, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Levi, Fabio
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (IUMSP), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Laboratory for Gynecological Oncology, Women’s Hospital/Department Research, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (IUMSP), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Assessing the value of CAN-gene mutations using MALDI-TOF MS2011In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 137, no 8, p. 1239-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sjöblom et al./Wood et al. already showed that the vast majority of CAN-genes are mutated at very low frequency. Due to the fact that we only found one mutation in our cohort, we therefore assume that at the selected loci, mutations might be low-frequency events and therefore, more rarely detectable. However, further evaluation of the CAN-gene mutations in larger cohorts should be the aim of further studies.

  • 14. Linderholm, B
    et al.
    Andersson, J
    Lindh, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Beckman, L
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Edin, K
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Overexpression of c-erbB-2 is related to a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and constitutes an independent prognostic factor in primary node-positive breast cancer after adjuvant systemic treatment2004In: Eur J Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Lindskog, Magnus
    et al.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Old age as risk indicator for poor end-of-life care quality: a population-based study of cancer deaths from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care2015In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 1331-1339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If patient age affects the quality of end-of-life care in cancer is unknown. Using data from a population-based register of palliative care in Sweden, we addressed this question. Methods: This nation-wide study focused on the last week of life of adults dying from cancer in 2011-2012, based on data reported to a national quality register for end-of-life care (N = 26,976). We specifically investigated if age-dependent differences were present with respect to thirteen indicators of palliative care quality. Patients were categorised in one out of five pre-defined age groups. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for type of end-of-life care unit, were calculated using logistic regression, with the oldest group as reference. Findings: Age-dependent differences in implementation rate were detected for ten out of thirteen end-of-life care quality indicators, most of which were progressively less well met with each increment in age group. Compared to elderly cancer patients, young patients were more often informed about imminent death, (OR, 3.9; 95% CI 2.5-5.9, p < 0.001), were more often systematically assessed for the presence and severity of pain (OR, 1.6; 95% CI 1.2-2.1, p < 0.001) or other symptoms (OR, 1.4; 95% CI 1.0-1.9, p = 0.044), were more likely to be assessed by palliative care consultation services (OR, 4.3; 95% CI 3.3-5.7, p < 0.001) and to have injections prescribed as needed against pain (OR, 3.4; 95% CI 1.3-9.4, p = 0.016), anxiety (OR, 3.8; 95% CI 2.0-7.1, p < 0.001) or nausea (OR, 3.6; 95% CI 2.3-5.7, p < 0.001). The families of young patients were more likely to be informed about imminent death ( OR, 2.6; 95% CI 1.5-4.3, p = 0.001) and to be offered bereavement support ( OR, 4.6; 95% CI 2.7-7.8, p < 0.001). Interpretation: Old age is a risk indicator for poor end-of-life care quality among cancer patients in Sweden. Funding: The executive committee of the National Quality Registries in Sweden.

  • 16. Lupo, P.
    et al.
    Luna-Gierke, R.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Scheurer, M.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Papworth, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Perinatal and Familial Risk Factors for Soft-Tissue Sarcomas in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study, Sweden, 1973-20122017In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 64, p. S4-S5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: Perinatal factors have been associated with soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) in case-control studies. However, (1) the specific contributions of factors including fetal growth remain unknown, (2) these factors have not been examined in large cohort studies, and (3) few assessments have evaluated risk in specific STS subtypes. Therefore, we sought to identify the role of perinatal and familial factors on the risk of STS in a large population-based birth cohort. Design/Methods: We identified 5,063,499 individuals in the Swedish Birth Registry born during 1973-2012. Subjects were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry, where incident STS cases were identified. We evaluated perinatal and familial factors obtained from Statistics Sweden, including: fetal growth, gestational age, presence of a congenital anomaly, and parental age. Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between selected factors and STS overall, as well as by common subtypes. Results: There were 673 children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with STS in 77.5 million person-years of follow-up. Having a congenital anomaly was associated with STS risk (IRR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.23-2.35). This association was stronger (IRR=2.89, 95% CI: 1.25-6.70) in more recent years (2000-2012). High fetal growth was also associated with STS during the same time period (IRR=1.87, 95% CI: 1.06-3.30). Being born preterm (35 years) was inversely associated with the risk of developing synovial sarcoma (IRR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.26-0.94). Conclusions: In this cohort study, those with congenital anomalies and other adverse birth outcomes were more likely to develop a STS compared to their unaffected contemporaries. These associations may point to disrupted developmental pathways influencing the risk of STS. Our findings could implicate novel mechanisms underlying susceptibility to STS and may inform future surveillance, prevention, and treatment efforts.

  • 17. Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Grønberg, Bjørn Henning
    Marosi, Christine
    Stupp, Roger
    Frappaz, Didier
    Schultz, Henrik
    Abacioglu, Ufuk
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lhermitte, Benoit
    Hegi, Monika E
    Rosell, Johan
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Temozolomide versus standard 6-week radiotherapy versus hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients older than 60 years with glioblastoma: the Nordic randomised, phase 3 trial.2012In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 916-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with glioblastoma are older than 60 years, but treatment guidelines are based on trials in patients aged only up to 70 years. We did a randomised trial to assess the optimum palliative treatment in patients aged 60 years and older with glioblastoma.

    METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited from Austria, Denmark, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey. They were assigned by a computer-generated randomisation schedule, stratified by centre, to receive temozolomide (200 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 of every 28 days for up to six cycles), hypofractionated radiotherapy (34·0 Gy administered in 3·4 Gy fractions over 2 weeks), or standard radiotherapy (60·0 Gy administered in 2·0 Gy fractions over 6 weeks). Patients and study staff were aware of treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN81470623.

    FINDINGS: 342 patients were enrolled, of whom 291 were randomised across three treatment groups (temozolomide n=93, hypofractionated radiotherapy n=98, standard radiotherapy n=100) and 51 of whom were randomised across only two groups (temozolomide n=26, hypofractionated radiotherapy n=25). In the three-group randomisation, in comparison with standard radiotherapy, median overall survival was significantly longer with temozolomide (8·3 months [95% CI 7·1-9·5; n=93] vs 6·0 months [95% CI 5·1-6·8; n=100], hazard ratio [HR] 0·70; 95% CI 0·52-0·93, p=0·01), but not with hypofractionated radiotherapy (7·5 months [6·5-8·6; n=98], HR 0·85 [0·64-1·12], p=0·24). For all patients who received temozolomide or hypofractionated radiotherapy (n=242) overall survival was similar (8·4 months [7·3-9·4; n=119] vs 7·4 months [6·4-8·4; n=123]; HR 0·82, 95% CI 0·63-1·06; p=0·12). For age older than 70 years, survival was better with temozolomide and with hypofractionated radiotherapy than with standard radiotherapy (HR for temozolomide vs standard radiotherapy 0·35 [0·21-0·56], p<0·0001; HR for hypofractionated vs standard radiotherapy 0·59 [95% CI 0·37-0·93], p=0·02). Patients treated with temozolomide who had tumour MGMT promoter methylation had significantly longer survival than those without MGMT promoter methylation (9·7 months [95% CI 8·0-11·4] vs 6·8 months [5·9-7·7]; HR 0·56 [95% CI 0·34-0·93], p=0·02), but no difference was noted between those with methylated and unmethylated MGMT promoter treated with radiotherapy (HR 0·97 [95% CI 0·69-1·38]; p=0·81). As expected, the most common grade 3-4 adverse events in the temozolomide group were neutropenia (n=12) and thrombocytopenia (n=18). Grade 3-5 infections in all randomisation groups were reported in 18 patients. Two patients had fatal infections (one in the temozolomide group and one in the standard radiotherapy group) and one in the temozolomide group with grade 2 thrombocytopenia died from complications after surgery for a gastrointestinal bleed.

    INTERPRETATION: Standard radiotherapy was associated with poor outcomes, especially in patients older than 70 years. Both temozolomide and hypofractionated radiotherapy should be considered as standard treatment options in elderly patients with glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation status might be a useful predictive marker for benefit from temozolomide. FUNDING: Merck, Lion's Cancer Research Foundation, University of Umeå, and the Swedish Cancer Society.

  • 18.
    Martinsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Eriksson, Monika
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Swedish Register of Palliative Care, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Swedish Register of Palliative Care, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Increasing the number of patients receiving information about transition to end-of-life care: the effect of a half-day physician and nurse training2016In: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, ISSN 2045-435X, E-ISSN 2045-4368, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 452-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Honest prognostication and information for patients are important parts of end-of-life care. This study examined whether an educational intervention could increase the proportion of patients who received information about the transition to end-of-life (ITEOL care).

    Method: Two municipalities (in charge of nursing homes) and two hospitals were randomised to receive an interactive half-day course about ITEOL for physicians and nurses. The proportion of patients who received ITEOL was measured with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC). Patients were only included if they died an expected death and maintained their ability to express their will until days or hours before their death. Four hospitals and four municipalities were assigned controls, matched by hospital size, population and proportion of patients receiving ITEOL at baseline.

    Results: The proportion of patients in the intervention group who received ITEOL increased from 35.1% (during a 6-month period before the intervention) to 42% (during a 6-month period after the intervention). The proportion in the control group increased from 30.4% to 33.7%. The effect of the intervention was significant (p=0.005) in a multivariable model adjusted for time, age, gender and cause of death.

    Conclusion: More patients at end-of-life received ITEOL after an educative half-day intervention directed to physicians and nurses.

  • 19.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Damber, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Reproductive factors have low impact on the risk of different primary brain tumours in offspring2003In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of our study was to investigate whether reproductive factors influence the risk of primary brain tumours (PBT) in offspring. Methods: Data on all deliveries in two Swedish counties from 1955 to 1990 were extracted from two birth registries. The follow-up period closed at the end of 1994, with subjects followed up to early middle age. Incidence rates of malignancy for 1958-1994 were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) and relative risks were calculated for astrocytomas, primitive neuroectodermal tumour, ependymoma and meningiomas in offspring. Results: Few associations were detected. High birth weight indicated an increased risk for astrocytomas grade I and II for all primary brain tumours, and the risk was close to significance for astrocytomas grade I-II (SIR = 3.64; CI = 0.98-9.31). For children under 15 years of age the risk for astrocytomas grade I and II was further increased (SIR = 4.44; Cl = 1.19-11.38). Conclusions:A consistent pattern of non-association indicated a low impact of intrauterine environment on the future development of primary brain tumours in offspring up to early middle age.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    A study of patients not registered in the Swedish cancer register but reported to the Swedish register of palliative care 2009 as deceased due to cancer2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 414-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish Cancer Register (SCR), an old and reputable health data register, contributes a large amount of data used in research. The quality of the research using SCR data depends on the completeness and validity of the register. In Sweden, every healthcare provider is obligated to report newly detected cases of cancer to the SCR regardless of the diagnostic basis. This study aimed to clarify whether there is an under-reporting of patients with cancer to the SCR or an over-reporting of cancer as cause of death to the SRPC as all patients do not appear in both registers. In addition, this study looked at the distribution of under-reporting or over-reporting related to age, sex, type of cancer, diagnostic basis, and department responsible for cancer diagnosis. Material and methods. Of the 10 559 patients whose cause of death was cancer as reported to the SRPC (2009), 1394 patients (13.2%) were not registered in the SCR (1958-2009). Medical records from a representative sample of 203 patients were collected and reviewed. Results. The medical records for 193 patients were obtained; of those, 183 (95%) patients should have been reported to the SCR. Among these, radiologic investigation was the most common basis for diagnosis and there was a significant over-representation of cancer of the pancreas, lung, liver, and bile ducts. Discussion. This study cannot quantify the completeness of the SCR. The findings indicate that 12.5% of patients dying of cancer in palliative care are not reported, that specialized hospital departments diagnose the vast majority of the unreported patients, and that routines for how to report patients to the SCR based on radiological findings should be revised.

  • 21.
    Nyström, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Berglund, Anette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Liver-metastatic potential of colorectal cancer is related to the stromal composition of the tumour2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 5183-5191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The tumour stroma is an important modulator of cancer cell behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the stromal composition between primary colorectal cancer (CRC) and colorectal liver metastases (CLM).

    Materials and Methods: The stromal composition in matched tissue sections of CRC and subsequent CLM was analysed, and related to clinical parameters.

    Results: Differences in the expression pattern of type I collagen and type IV collagen in CRC was related to a higher risk of CLM. Two types of CLM the desmoplastic and pushing type were identified. The time between CRC and diagnosis of CLM was shorter (p=0.047) for desmoplastic CLM. The mortality rate was higher for pushing CLM due to frequent extrahepatic disseminated disease. A difference in the overall survival rate between patients with desmoplastic and those with pushing CLM was seen at follow-up of more than 60 months (p=0.046).

    Conclusion: The liver-metastasizing potential is related to the stromal composition of primary CRC. There are distinct growth patterns in CLM with differences in stromal composition and clinical outcome.

  • 22.
    Nyström, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björklund, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Improved tumor marker sensitivity by combined type IV collagen and CEA measurement in colorectal liver metastasesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nyström, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björklund, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Naredi, Peter
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Improved tumour marker sensitivity in detecting colorectal liver metastases by combined type IV collagen and CEA measurement2015In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 9839-9847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is the best circulating tumour marker for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) but has suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Circulating type IV collagen (COLIV) is a new potential CLM marker. Here, COLIV and CEA were measured in patients with resectable CLM. COLIV levels were also related to the type of CLM. The prognostic value of these markers and the type of CLM on survival was evaluated. Preoperative plasma samples (n = 94) from patients (n = 85) with CLM undergoing liver resection were used. Seven patients underwent repeated liver resection. Samples from 118 healthy individuals served as control. Samples after liver resection (n = 27) were analysed and related to recurrence. COLIV and CEA levels were analysed, and the type of CLM was classified using paraffinated tissue. Results were analysed by logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. CLM patients had significantly elevated levels of COLIV compared to controls (p = 0.001). The sensitivity of COLIV was not better than CEA, but improved sensitivity for detecting CLM was observed with a combination of the two markers compared to using either marker alone (p = 0.001). Circulating COLIV was elevated in 81 % and CEA in 56 % of CLM patients at diagnosis, and high marker levels were related to poor survival. In follow-up samples (n = 27), patients with CLM recurrence (n = 14) had significantly elevated COLIV levels compared to patients without postoperative recurrence (n = 10) (p = 0.001). COLIV is a promising tumour marker for CLM and can possibly be used to detect postoperative CLM recurrence. The combination of COLIV and CEA is superior to either marker alone in detecting CLM.

  • 24.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Doctors' estimation of cardiovascular risk and willingness to give drug treatment in hypertension: fair risk assessment but defensive treatment policy2004In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Rasmuson, Torgny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Risk of parathyroid adenomas in patients with thyrotoxicosis exposed to radioactive iodine2006In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 1059-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Rydh, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Lundblad, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Åhlström Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    MRI of the skeleton in prostate cancer staging.2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 222-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the value of MRI in the detection of bone metastases in newly diagnosed prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI examinations of the axial skeleton in 76 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were reviewed, and the relation of these findings to the serum level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) was examined. RESULTS: MRI indicated bone metastases in 26/76 patients (34%) in the entire study group, in 4/24 (17%) with serum PSA <20 ng/ml and in 22/52 (42%) with serum PSA >20 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that MRI is a more sensitive indicator of suspected bone metastases than bone scintigraphy in the low range of serum PSA, but less sensitive in the high range. Further studies of MRI and bone scintigraphy in parallel in patients with serum PSA <20 ng/ml are needed to elucidate their relative value in the staging of patients with prostate cancer.

  • 27.
    Rydh, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Sten
    Stigbrand, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Damber, Jan Erik
    Hietala, Sven-Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Radioimmunotherapy of DU-145 tumours in nude mice--a pilot study with E4, a novel monoclonal antibody against prostate cancer.1999In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1075-1079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anti-tumour effect of the 131I-labelled antiprostate monoclonal antibody (MAb) E4 was studied in an experimental model with 41 nude mice, subcutaneously xenografted with a human prostate cancer cell line (DU-145). The mice were divided into four study groups, i.e. one receiving single and another repeated injections of the radiolabelled MAb. A third group was injected with non-labelled MAb, and the fourth served as an untreated control group. The tumour volumes increased similarly in all groups during the 27-day observation period. The tumour tissue was morphologically disintegrated in the group that received repeated radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The tumours from this group contained large fluid-filled cystic parts and demonstrated pronounced cellular and subcellular polymorphism in the remaining viable tumour tissue. The untreated control tumours and single therapy tumours remained solid. The proportion of the total tumour volume that consisted of viable tumour cells, as determined by morphometric techniques, was significantly lower in the 131I-E4-treated groups. The use of 131I-labelled E4 MAb has thus demonstrated a promising therapeutic potential.

  • 28. Scheurer, Michael E
    et al.
    Etzel, Carol J
    Liu, Mei
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wrensch, Margaret R
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa L
    Familial aggregation of glioma: a pooled analysis2010In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 172, no 10, p. 1099-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In genome-wide association studies, inherited risk of glioma has been demonstrated for rare familial syndromes and with common variants from 3-5 chromosomal regions. To assess the degree of familial aggregation of glioma, the authors performed a pooled analysis of data from 2 large glioma case-control studies in the United States (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (1994-2006) and University of California, San Francisco (1991-2004)) and from the Swedish Cancer Registry (1958-2006) to measure excess cases of cancer among first-degree relatives of glioma probands. This analysis included 20,377 probands with glioma and 52,714 first-degree relatives. No overall increase was found in the expected number of cancers among family members; however, there were 77% more gliomas than expected. There were also significantly more sarcoma and melanoma cases than expected, which is supported by evidence in the literature, whereas there were significantly fewer-than-expected cases of leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and bladder, lung, pancreatic, prostate, and uterine cancers. This large pooled analysis provided sufficient numbers of related family members to examine the genetic mechanisms involved in the aggregation of glioma with other cancers in these families. However, misclassification due to unvalidated cancers among family members could account for the differences seen by study site.

  • 29.
    Sjöström, Olle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Unit of Research, Education and Development, Östersund.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Decentralized colonoscopic surveillance with high patient compliance prevents hereditary and familial colorectal cancer2016In: Familial Cancer, ISSN 1389-9600, E-ISSN 1573-7292, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 543-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although colonoscopic surveillance is recommended both for individuals with known hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) syndromes and those with a more moderate familial colorectal cancer (FCRC) history, the evidence for the benefits of surveillance is limited and surveillance practices vary. This study evaluates the preventive effect for individuals with a family history of CRC of decentralized colonoscopic surveillance with the guidance of a cancer prevention clinic. We performed a population based prospective study of 261 patients with HCRC or FCRC, recorded in the colonoscopic surveillance registry at the Cancer genetics clinic, University Hospital of Umeå, Sweden. Colonoscopic surveillance was conducted every second (HCRC) or fifth (FCRC) year at local hospitals in Northern Sweden. Main outcome measures were findings of high-risk adenomas (HRA) or CRC, and patient compliance to surveillance. Estimations of the expected numbers of CRC without surveillance were made. During a total of 1256 person years of follow-up, one case of CRC was found. The expected numbers of cancers in the absence of surveillance was between 9.5 and 10.5, resulting in a standardized incidence ratio, observed versus expected cases of CRC, between 0.10 (CI 95 % 0.0012–0.5299) and 0.11 (CI 95 % 0.0014–0.5857). No CRC mortality was reported, but three patients needed surgical intervention. HRA were found in 5.9 % (14/237) of the initial and in 3.4 % (12/356) of the follow-up colonoscopies. Patient compliance to the surveillance program was 90 % as 597 of the planned 662 colonoscopies were performed. The study concludes that colonoscopic surveillance with high patient compliance to the program is effective in preventing CRC when using a decentralized method for colonoscopy surveillance with the guidance of a cancer prevention clinic.

  • 30. Svensk, A. C.
    et al.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Emilsson, S.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Parfa, A.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Conversational support group participation during radiotherapy period helps women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer2015In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 51, p. S232-S232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Svenson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nordfjäll, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Nilsson, Peter
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Breast cancer survival is associated with telomere length in peripheral blood cells2008In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 68, no 10, p. 3618-3623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomeres are essential for maintaining chromosomal stability. Previous studies have indicated that individuals with shorter blood telomeres may be at higher risk of developing various types of cancer, such as in lung, bladder, and kidney. We have analyzed relative telomere length (RTL) of peripheral blood cells in relation to breast cancer incidence and prognosis. The study included 265 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and 446 female controls. RTL was measured by real-time PCR, and our results show that the patient group displayed significantly longer telomeres compared with controls (P < 0.001). Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) for breast cancer risk increased with increasing telomere length, with a maximal OR of 5.17 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.09-8.64] for the quartile with the longest telomeres. Furthermore, RTL carried prognostic information for patients with advanced disease. Node positive (N+) patients with short telomeres (</=median) showed an increased survival compared with N+ patients with long telomeres (P = 0.001). For patients with ages <50 years with tumors >16 mm (median tumor diameter), short telomeres were associated with a significantly better outcome than longer telomeres (P = 0.006). Cox regression analysis showed that long RTL was a significant independent negative prognostic factor (hazards ratio, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.33-6.39; P = 0.007). Our results indicate that blood RTL may serve as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer patients with advanced disease.

  • 32. Varadi, Verena
    et al.
    Brendle, Annika
    Brandt, Andreas
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svenson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Polymorphisms in telomere-associated genes, breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis2009In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 45, no 17, p. 3008-3016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomeres are essential structures for maintaining chromosomal stability and their length has been reported to correlate with cancer risk and clinical outcome. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding telomere-associated proteins could affect telomere length and chromosomal stability by influencing gene expression or protein configuration in the telomeres. Here, we report the results of the first association study on genetic variation in telomere-associated genes and their effect on telomere length, breast cancer (BC) susceptibility and prognosis. We genotyped 14 potentially functional and most informative SNPs in nine telomere-associated genes (TERT, TEP1, TERF1, TERF2, TERF2IP, ACD, POT1, TNKS and TNKS2) in 782 incident BC cases and 1559 matched controls. Relative telomere length (RTL) varied statistically significantly between the genotypes of the SNPs rs446977 (TEP1, p=0.04), rs938886 (TEP1, p=0.04) and rs6990097 (TNKS, p=0.04). However, none of them was associated with BC susceptibility and only rs6990097 correlated with regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio (OR) 1.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.77). The strongest association with BC susceptibility was observed for rs3785074 (TERF2, OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.83) and rs10509637 (TNKS2, OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.62). Haplotype and diplotype analysis confirmed the association of the TNKS2 gene with BC susceptibility. rs3785074 (TERF2) was additionally associated with histologic grade (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.08-1.92) and negative oestrogen receptor status (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.13-7.58). None of the SNPs showed a significant correlation with survival of the breast cancer patients. With these results, none of the SNPs represents any valuable prognostic marker for BC.

  • 33.
    Widmark, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Self-assessment questionnaire for evaluating urinary and intestinal late side effects after pelvic radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer compared with an age-matched control population1994In: Cancer, ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 74, no 9, p. 2520-2532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pelvic irradiation to patients with prostate cancer is accompanied by urinary and intestinal reactions. In men older than 60 years, treatment-induced problems should be evaluated in relation to problems in an age-matched nonirradiated population.

    METHODS: In the present study, problems in the urinary tract and intestine were evaluated with a self-assessment questionnaire using the linear-analogue scale. The questionnaire was mailed out to 200 patients and to an age-matched population 24-56 months after irradiation.

    RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of the control group and 50% of the patient group reported some kind of problem in the urinary tract. The most common urinary problems in the control group and in the patient group, respectively, were urgency (19 and 42%), starting problems (22 and 33%), and leakage (11 and 32%). In the control and patient groups, 14 and 59%, respectively, reported some kind of gastrointestinal problems. The most common intestinal problems in the control and patient groups were respectively, mucus (4 and 38%), cramp (5 and 14%), leakage (2 and 27%), and blood (2 and 36%). Ninety percent of the patients' problems were minor.

    CONCLUSION: Pelvic irradiation induced a relatively large number of minor problems, evaluated with a self-assessment questionnaire and compared with an age-matched population of men, of approximately similar magnitude as with a physician's systematic evaluation. The most important urinary factors were urgency and leakage. The most important intestinal factors were blood, mucus, and leakage. The results support the ongoing efforts to use 3-D computed tomography-based conformal therapy to decrease irradiation dose to the rectum and bladder.

  • 34.
    Widmark, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gunnlaugsson, A.
    Beckman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Dept Radiat Sci, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hoyer, M.
    Lagerlund, M.
    Fransson, P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Norman, D. B.
    Kindblom, J.
    Ginman, C.
    Johansson, B.
    Seke, M.
    Bjorlinger, K.
    Agrup, M.
    Kjellen, E.
    Franzén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, P.
    Ultrahypofractionation for prostate cancer: Outcome from the Scandinavian phase 3 HYPO-RT-PC trial2018In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 127, p. S314-S314Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Widmark, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn
    Beckman, Lars
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hoyer, Morten
    Lagerlund, Magnus
    Kindblom, Jon
    Ginman, Claes
    Johansson, Bengt
    Björnlinger, Kirsten
    Seke, Mihajl
    Agrup, Måns
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Norman, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Anderson, Harald
    Kjellén, Elisabeth
    Franzén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Ultra-hypofractionated versus conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: 5-year outcomes of the HYPO-RT-PC randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial2019In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 394, no 10196, p. 385-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer has gained increased attention due to its proposed high radiation-fraction sensitivity. Recent reports from studies comparing moderately hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy support the clinical use of moderate hypofractionation. To date, there are no published randomised studies on ultra-hypofractionated radiotherapy. Here, we report the outcomes of the Scandinavian HYPO-RT-PC phase 3 trial with the aim to show non-inferiority of ultra-hypofractionation compared with conventional fractionation.

    Methods: In this open-label, randomised, phase 3 non-inferiority trial done in 12 centres in Sweden and Denmark, we recruited men up to 75 years of age with intermediate-to-high-risk prostate cancer and a WHO performance status between 0 and 2. Patients were randomly assigned to ultra-hypofractionation (42·7 Gy in seven fractions, 3 days per week for 2·5 weeks) or conventional fractionated radiotherapy (78·0 Gy in 39 fractions, 5 days per week for 8 weeks). No androgen deprivation therapy was allowed. The primary endpoint was time to biochemical or clinical failure, analysed in the per-protocol population. The prespecified non-inferiority margin was 4% at 5 years, corresponding to a critical hazard ratio (HR) limit of 1·338. Physician-recorded toxicity was measured according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity scale and patient-reported outcome measurements with the Prostate Cancer Symptom Scale (PCSS) questionnaire. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN45905321.

    Findings: Between July 1, 2005, and Nov 4, 2015, 1200 patients were randomly assigned to conventional fractionation (n=602) or ultra-hypofractionation (n=598), of whom 1180 (591 conventional fractionation and 589 ultra-hypofractionation) constituted the per-protocol population. 1054 (89%) participants were intermediate risk and 126 (11%) were high risk. Median follow-up time was 5·0 years (IQR 3·1–7·0). The estimated failure-free survival at 5 years was 84% (95% CI 80–87) in both treatment groups, with an adjusted HR of 1·002 (95% CI 0·758–1·325; log-rank p=0·99). There was weak evidence of an increased frequency of acute physician-reported RTOG grade 2 or worse urinary toxicity in the ultra-hypofractionation group at end of radiotherapy (158 [28%] of 569 patients vs 132 [23%] of 578 patients; p=0·057). There were no significant differences in grade 2 or worse urinary or bowel late toxicity between the two treatment groups at any point after radiotherapy, except for an increase in urinary toxicity in the ultra-hypofractionation group compared to the conventional fractionation group at 1-year follow-up (32 [6%] of 528 patients vs 13 [2%] of 529 patients; (p=0·0037). We observed no differences between groups in frequencies at 5 years of RTOG grade 2 or worse urinary toxicity (11 [5%] of 243 patients for the ultra-hypofractionation group vs 12 [5%] of 249 for the conventional fractionation group; p=1·00) and bowel toxicity (three [1%] of 244 patients vs nine [4%] of 249 patients; p=0·14). Patient-reported outcomes revealed significantly higher levels of acute urinary and bowel symptoms in the ultra-hypofractionation group compared with the conventional fractionation group but no significant increases in late symptoms were found, except for increased urinary symptoms at 1-year follow-up, consistent with the physician-evaluated toxicity.

    Interpretation: Ultra-hypofractionated radiotherapy is non-inferior to conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for intermediate-to-high risk prostate cancer regarding failure-free survival. Early side-effects are more pronounced with ultra-hypofractionation compared with conventional fractionation whereas late toxicity is similar in both treatment groups. The results support the use of ultra-hypofractionation for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Funding: The Nordic Cancer Union, the Swedish Cancer Society, and the Swedish Research Council.

  • 36. Wilkening, Stefan
    et al.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Canzian, Federico
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Altieri, Andrea
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hemminki, Kari
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Försti, Asta
    Interleukin promoter polymorphisms and prognosis in colorectal cancer.2008In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1202-1206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong evidence that cancer-associated inflammation promotes tumor growth and progression. This is especially true for colorectal cancer (CRC). Interleukins (ILs) are important modulators for inflammation. We examined whether promoter polymorphisms in key IL genes (IL4, IL4R, IL6, IL8 and IL10) are associated with the risk or clinical outcome of CRC. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in genomic DNA from a cohort including 308 Swedish incident cases of CRC with data on Dukes' stage and up to 16 years of follow-up and 585 healthy controls. The selected SNPs have previously been shown to be functional and/or associated with cancer. None of the analyzed SNPs associated with the risk of CRC. When stratifying by tumor stage, significantly more patients carrying at least one G allele of IL10-1082 had tumors with Dukes' stages A + B than with stages C + D (P(trend) = 0.035 for genotype distribution). Analyzing associations with overall survival time, we found the rare T allele of IL4-590 to be related to a longer survival [CT versus CC Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.69, 95% confidence intervals 0.46-1.03, TT versus CC 0.32 (0.10-1.03)]. For IL6-174, the CG genotype was associated with a longer survival when compared with the CC genotype [0.64 (0.40-1.01)]. The present study was particularly suitable for survival analysis because all patients were sampled before the diagnosis of CRC. Our results suggest that the SNPs IL4-590 and IL6-174 may be useful markers for CRC prognosis. The predicted biological effect of these SNPs in relation to promotion of cancer progression is consistent with the observed increased survival time.

  • 37.
    Öberg, Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Höyhtyä, Matti
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Limited value of preoperative serum analyses of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) in colorectal cancer2000In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 20, no 2B, p. 1085-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: We studied whether preoperative serum levels of free MMP-2, the MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex, and total amounts of MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 correlated to the tumor stage and prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    METHODS: Samples from 158 patients operated on for colorectal cancer (100 colon, 58 rectum) and samples from 80 healthy blood donors were analyzed using an ELISA technique. One hundred and thirty-three patients were resected for cure, (31, 61, and 41 in Dukes' stages A, B, and C, respectively). At follow-up in January 1998, 44 patients had died from their cancer after a median time 14 months (range 2-55). Fifteen patients died without tumor relapse. Ninety-nine patients were alive after, a median time of 46 months (range 17-68).

    RESULTS: Wide, overlapping ranges were observed for all factors both in the patients and in the control group. The patients as compared to the control group had significantly higher levels of free MMP-2 and total amounts of MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, whereas the level of the MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex was significantly lower. TIMP-1 was significantly higher in Dukes' D compared to Dukes' A-C cases; the other factors did not correlate to tumor stage. Elevated TIMP-2 levels (median cut-off limit), only, correlated to worse prognosis when analysed in all patients (p < 0.05). None of the factors (median cut-off limit) correlated to survival in Dukes' A-C patients; analyses based on the upper quartile cut-off limit demonstrated that elevated MMP-2 levels correlated to shorter survival time (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Serum analyses of free MMP-2 the MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex and total amounts of MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 are of limited value for tumor staging and prognosis in colorectal cancer.

  • 38.
    Öberg, Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Are lymph node micrometastases of any clinical significance in Dukes' stages A and B colorectal cancer?1998In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 1244-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the significance of lymph node micrometastases in Dukes Stages A and B colorectal cancer.

    METHODS: Archival specimens were examined from 147 patients (96 colon, 51 rectum; 44 Stage A, 103 Stage B) who had surgery between 1987 and 1994. One lymph node section from each node (colon, 1-11; median, 4; rectum, 1-15; median, 3) was examined with use of an anticytokeratin antibody.

    RESULTS: Forty-seven (32 percent) patients had micrometastases. At follow-up in June 1996, 23 patients had died of cancer or with known tumor relapse, after a median time of 28 (range, 5-67) months; 8 of 47 (17 percent) patients had micrometastases, 15 of 100 (15 percent) did not. No statistically significant differences were observed according to micrometastases when the results were analyzed with respect to Dukes stage or survival time. The median survival time of living patients with micrometastases was 48 (range, 18-97) months, and for patients without micrometastases, 48 (range, 19-111) months. Six of 96 living patients had a tumor relapse; three of these displayed micrometastases.

    CONCLUSION: Lymph node micrometastases are not a useful prognostic marker in Dukes Stages A and B and do not imply different strategies for additional therapy or follow-up.

  • 39.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Edberg Thyme, Karin
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Art therapy during radiotherapy – A five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer2014In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001 to 2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five to seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain 'Social relations' in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001 to 2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective.

  • 40.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Art therapy during radiotherapy: a five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer2014In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001-2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to at least four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five - seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain ‘Social relations’ in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001–2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective.

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