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  • 1. Avagyan, Rozanna
    et al.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Determination of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by HPLC-photoionization tandem mass spectrometry in wood smoke particles and soil samples2015In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 407, no 16, p. 4523-4534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and fast method for analysis of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using pressurized liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography utilizing photoionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed. Simultaneous separation and determination of nine hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and two hydroxy biphenyls could be performed in negative mode with a run time of 12 min, including equilibration in 5 min. The calibration curves were in two concentration ranges; 1-50 ng/mL and 0.01-50 mu g/mL, with coefficients of correlation R (2) > 0.997. The limits of detection and method quantification limits were in the range of 9-56 pg and 5-38 ng/g, respectively. A two-level full factorial experimental design was used for screening of conditions with the highest impact on the extraction. The extraction procedure was automated and suitable for a large number of samples. The extraction recoveries ranged from 70 to 102 % and the matrix effects were between 92 and 104 %. The overall method was demonstrated on wood smoke particles and soil samples with good analytical performance, and five OH-PAHs were determined in the concentration range of 0.19-210 mu g/g. As far as we know, hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined in wood smoke and soil samples using photoionization mass spectrometry for the first time in this present study. Accordingly, this study shows that high performance liquid chromatography photoionization tandem mass spectrometry can be a good option for the determination of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in complex environmental samples.

  • 2. Avagyan, Rozanna
    et al.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindgren, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Particulate hydroxy-PAH emissions from a residential wood log stove using different fuels and burning conditions2016In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 140, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but have not been studied as extensively as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Several studies have however shown that hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have toxic and carcinogenic properties. They have been detected in air samples in semi urban areas and combustion is assumed to be the primary source of those compounds. To better understand the formation and occurrence of particulate hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential wood log stove combustion, 9 hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 2 hydroxy biphenyls were quantified in particles generated from four different types of wood logs (birch, spruce, pine, aspen) and two different combustion conditions (nominal and high burn rate). A previously developed method utilizing liquid chromatography photo ionization tandem mass spectrometry and pressurized liquid extraction was used. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were analyzed along with hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions varied significantly across different wood types and burning conditions; the highest emissions for nominal burn rate were from spruce and for high burn rate from pine burning. Emissions from nominal burn rate corresponded on average to 15% of the emissions from high burn rate, with average emissions of 218 mu g/MJ(fuel) and 32.5 mu g/MJ(fuel) for high burn rate and nominal burn rate, respectively. Emissions of the measured hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons corresponded on average to 28% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions. This study shows that wood combustion is a large emission source of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and that not only combustion conditions, but also wood type influences the emissions of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. There are few studies that have determined hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in emissions from wood combustion, and it is therefore necessary to further investigate the formation, occurrence and distribution of these compounds as they are present in significant amounts in wood smoke particles.

  • 3. Eriksson, A. C.
    et al.
    Nordin, E. Z.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Swietlicki, E.
    Bergvall, C.
    Westerholm, R.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pagels, J. H.
    Particulate PAH Emissions from Residential Biomass Combustion: Time-Resolved Analysis with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry2014In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 7143-7150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time-resolved emissions of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total organic particulate matter (OA) from a wood log stove and an adjusted pellet stove were investigated with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (ANIS). The highest OA emissions were found during the addition of log wood on glowing embers, that is, slow burning pyrolysis conditions. These emissions contained about 1% PAHs (of OA). The highest PAH emissions were found during fast burning under hot air starved combustion conditions, in both stoves. In the latter case, PAHs contributed up to 40% of OA, likely due to thermal degradation of other condensable species. The distribution of PAHs was also shifted toward larger molecules in these emissions. ANIS signals attributed to PAHs were found at molecular weights up to 600 Da. The vacuum aerodynamic size distribution was found to be bimodal with a smaller mode (D-va similar to 200 nm) dominating under hot air starved combustion and a larger sized mode dominating under slow burning pyrolysis (D-va similar to 600 nm). Simultaneous reduction of PAHs, OA and total particulate matter from residential biomass combustion may prove to be a challenge for environmental legislation efforts as these classes of emissions are elevated at different combustion conditions.

  • 4.
    Fagerström, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Dan, Boström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Fuel conversion of large samples in a thermogravimetric analyzer set-up: method description and applications2011In: 19th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition: From Research to Industry and Markets, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hunter, Amanda
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Langrish, Jeremy P
    University of Edinburgh.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Raftis, Jennifer B
    University of Edinburgh.
    Miller, Mark R
    University of Edinburgh.
    Lucking, Andrew J
    University of Edinburgh.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Donaldson, Kenneth
    University of Edinburgh.
    Flapan, Andrew D
    University of Edinburgh.
    Pung, Louis
    University of Edinburgh.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University.
    Masala, Silvia
    Stockholm University.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E
    University of Edinburgh.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    University of Edinburgh.
    Effect of wood smoke exposure on vascular function and thrombus formation in healthy fire fighters2014In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 11, article id 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in fire fighters and has been linked with exposure to air pollution and fire suppression duties. We therefore investigated the effects of wood smoke exposure on vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and thrombus formation in healthy fire fighters. Methods: In a double-blind randomized cross-over study, 16 healthy male fire fighters were exposed to wood smoke (~1 mg/m3 particulate matter concentration) or filtered air for one hour during intermittent exercise. Arterial pressure and stiffness were measured before and immediately after exposure, and forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial infusion of endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators 4–6 hours after exposure. Thrombus formation was assessed using the ex vivo Badimon chamber at 2 hours, and platelet activation was measured using flow cytometry for up to 24 hours after the exposure. Results: Compared to filtered air, exposure to wood smoke increased blood carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations (1.3% versus 0.8%; P < 0.001), but had no effect on arterial pressure, augmentation index or pulse wave velocity (P > 0.05 for all). Whilst there was a dose-dependent increase in forearm blood flow with each vasodilator (P < 0.01 for all), there were no differences in blood flow responses to acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside or verapamil between exposures (P > 0.05 for all). Following exposure to wood smoke, vasodilatation to bradykinin increased (P = 0.003), but there was no effect on bradykinin-induced tissue-plasminogen activator release, thrombus area or markers of platelet activation (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions: Wood smoke exposure does not impair vascular vasomotor or fibrinolytic function, or increase thrombus formation in fire fighters. Acute cardiovascular events following fire suppression may be precipitated by exposure to other air pollutants or through other mechanisms, such as strenuous physical exertion and dehydration.

  • 6. Martinsson, J
    et al.
    Eriksson, A C
    Nielsen, I Elbaek
    Berg Malmborg, V
    Ahlberg, E
    Andersen, C
    Lindgren, R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, E Z
    Brune, W H
    Svenningsson, B
    Swietlicki, E
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pagels, J H
    Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 24, p. 14663-14671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  • 7.
    Muala, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nicklasson, Hanna
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Swietlicki, Erik
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Löndahl, Jakob
    Respiratory Tract Deposition of Inhaled Wood Smoke Particles in Healthy Volunteers2015In: Journal of Aerosol Medicine, ISSN 1941-2711, E-ISSN 1941-2703, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 237-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Respiratory tract deposition of air pollution particles is a key to their adverse health effects. This study was aimed to determine the size-resolved deposition fraction (DF) of sooty wood smoke particles in the lungs of healthy subjects. The type of wood smoke investigated is typical for household air pollution from solid fuels, which is among the largest environmental health problems globally.

    Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers inhaled diluted wood smoke from incomplete soot-rich combustion in a common wood stove. The DF of smoke particles (10–500 nm) was measured during three 15-min exposures in each subject during spontaneous breathing. Lung function was measured using standard spirometry.

    Results: The total DFs by particle number concentration were 0.34±0.08. This can be compared with DFs of 0.21–0.23 in healthy subjects during previous experiments with wood pellet combustion. For particle mass, the total DFs found in this study were 0.22±0.06. DF and breathing frequency were negatively correlated as expected from model calculations (p<0.01).

    Conclusions: The DF of the investigated sooty wood smoke particles was higher than for previously investigated particles generated during more efficient combustion of biomass. Together with toxicological studies, which have indicated that incomplete biomass combustion particles rich in soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are especially harmful, these data highlight the health risks of inadequate wood combustion.

  • 8.
    Muala, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Westerholm, Roger
    Jalava, Pasi I.
    Happo, Mikko S.
    Uski, Oskari
    Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta
    Kelly, Frank J.
    Mudway, Ian S.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Acute exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustion - indications of cytotoxicity2015In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 12, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoke from combustion of biomass fuels is a major risk factor for respiratory disease, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustion would elicit airway inflammation in humans. Methods: Fourteen healthy subjects underwent controlled exposures on two separate occasions to filtered air and wood smoke from incomplete combustion with PM1 concentration at 314 mu g/m(3) for 3 h in a chamber. Bronchoscopy with bronchial wash (BW), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and endobronchial mucosal biopsies was performed after 24 h. Differential cell counts and soluble components were analyzed, with biopsies stained for inflammatory markers using immunohistochemistry. In parallel experiments, the toxicity of the particulate matter (PM) generated during the chamber exposures was investigated in vitro using the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. Results: Significant reductions in macrophage, neutrophil and lymphocyte numbers were observed in BW (p < 0.01, < 0.05, < 0.05, respectively) following the wood smoke exposure, with a reduction in lymphocytes numbers in BAL fluid (< 0.01. This unexpected cellular response was accompanied by decreased levels of sICAM-1, MPO and MMP-9 (p < 0.05, < 0.05 and < 0.01). In contrast, significant increases in submucosal and epithelial CD3+ cells, epithelial CD8+ cells and submucosal mast cells (p < 0.01, < 0.05, < 0.05 and < 0.05, respectively), were observed after wood smoke exposure. The in vitro data demonstrated that wood smoke particles generated under these incomplete combustion conditions induced cell death and DNA damage, with only minor inflammatory responses. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to sooty PAH rich wood smoke did not induce an acute neutrophilic inflammation, a classic hallmark of air pollution exposure in humans. While minor proinflammatory lymphocytic and mast cells effects were observed in the bronchial biopsies, significant reductions in BW and BAL cells and soluble components were noted. This unexpected observation, combined with the in vitro data, suggests that wood smoke particles from incomplete combustion could be potentially cytotoxic. Additional research is required to establish the mechanism of this dramatic reduction in airway leukocytes and to clarify how this acute response contributes to the adverse health effects attributed to wood smoke exposure.

  • 9.
    Muala, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Westerholm, Roger
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Kelly, Frank
    Mudway, Ian
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bronchial mucosal inflammation in healthy subjects after exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Indoor smoke from combustion of solid biomass fuel is a major risk factor for respiratory disease worldwide. The mechanisms by which wood smoke exhibits its effects on human health are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to wood smoke produced from incomplete combustion would elicit an airway inflammatory response.

    Methods Fourteen healthy subjects underwent controlled chamber exposure on two occasions to filtered air and to sooty wood smoke (PM1 ~ 314 μg/m3), generated by a common Nordic wood stove firing birch logs. The study was performed with a double-blind randomized cross-over design and the subjects alternated between exercise (VE=20 L/min/m2) and rest at 15-minute intervals for 3 hours. Bronchoscopies were performed 24 hours after each exposure where bronchial wash (BW), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and endobronchial biopsies were taken. Differential cell counts and soluble components were analyzed in BW and BAL. Bronchial mucosal biopsies were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Blood tests for inflammatory markers were sampled pre-exposure as well as at 24 and 44-hour time points post-exposure. Spirometry and Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) were performed before, immediately after and 24 hours after each exposure.

    Results There was a significant increase in submucosal and epithelial CD3+ lymphocytes (p<0.01 and <0.05 respectively), together with CD8+ cells in the epithelium (p<0.05) after exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Mast cells were also significantly increased in the submucosa (p<0.01) after wood smoke exposure.

    There were significant reductions in macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes in BW after exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air, accompanied by decreased levels of soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (sICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). No significant effects on cell numbers or acute inflammatory markers were demonstrated in BAL fluid or peripheral blood. Lung function and FENO were not affected by exposure to wood smoke.

    Conclusions Wood smoke exposure caused a significant increase in bronchial epithelial and submucosal CD3+ lymphocytes together with an increase in mucosal mast cells. Further examination revealed a significant increase in CD8+ lymphocytes within the epithelium. Unexpectedly there were no indications of any neutrophilic airway response or recruitment of alveolar macrophages. BW cell numbers, MPO and MMP-9 levels were also significantly reduced after wood smoke exposure. Further research is needed to determine the precise role of these events in relationship to the adverse health effects attributed to wood smoke exposure.

  • 10. Nielsen, Ingeborg E.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Axel C.
    Lindgren, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Martinsson, Johan
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Erik Z.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nojgaard, Jacob K.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Time-resolved analysis of particle emissions from residential biomass combustion: Emissions of refractory black carbon, PAHs and organic tracers2017In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 165, p. 179-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time-resolved particle emissions from a conventional wood stove were investigated with aerosol mass spectrometry to provide links between combustion conditions, emission factors, mixing state of refractory black carbon and implications for organic tracer methods. The addition of a new batch of fuel results in low temperature pyrolysis as the fuel heats up, resulting in strong, short-lived, variable emission peaks of organic aerosol-containing markers of anhydrous sugars, such as levoglucosan (fragment at m/z 60). Flaming combustion results in emissions dominated by refractory black carbon co-emitted with minor fractions of organic aerosol and markers of anhydrous sugars. Full cycle emissions are an external mixture of larger organic aerosol-dominated and smaller thinly coated refractory black carbon particles. A very high burn rate results in increased full cycle mass emission factors of 66, 2.7, 2.8 and 1.3 for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon, total organic aerosol and m/z 60, respectively, compared to nominal burn rate. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are primarily associated with refractory black carbon-containing particles. We hypothesize that at very high burn rates, the central parts of the combustion zone become air starved, leading to a locally reduced combustion temperature that reduces the conversion rates from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to refractory black carbon. This facilitates a strong increase of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions. At nominal burn rates, full cycle emissions based on m/z 60 correlate well with organic aerosol, refractory black carbon and particulate matter. However, at higher burn rates, m/z 60 does not correlate with increased emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon and organic aerosol in the flaming phase. The new knowledge can be used to advance source apportionment studies, reduce emissions of genotoxic compounds and model the climate impacts of refractory black carbon, such as absorption enhancement by lensing. 

  • 11. Nordin, Erik Z.
    et al.
    Uski, Oskari
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Jalava, Pasi
    Eriksson, Axel C.
    Genberg, Johan
    Roldin, Pontus
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Westerholm, Roger
    Jokiniemi, Jorma
    Pagels, Joakim H.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta
    Influence of ozone initiated processing on the toxicity of aerosol particles from small scale wood combustion2015In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 102, p. 282-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Black carbon containing emissions from biomass combustion are being transformed in the atmosphere upon processing induced by tropospheric ozone and UV. The knowledge today is very limited on how atmospheric processing affects the toxicological properties of the emissions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ozone initiated (dark) atmospheric processing on the physicochemical and toxicological properties of particulate emissions from wood combustion. Emissions from a conventional wood stove operated at two combustion conditions (nominal and hot air starved) were diluted and transferred to a chamber. Particulate matter (PM) was collected before and after ozone addition to the chamber using an impactor. Detailed chemical and physical characterization was performed on chamber air and collected PM. The collected PM was investigated toxicologically in vitro with a mouse macrophage model, endpoints included: cell cycle analysis, viability, inflammation and genotoxicity. The results suggest that changes in the organic fraction, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the main driver for differences in obtained toxicological effects. Fresh hot air starved emissions containing a higher organic and PAH mass-fraction affected cell viability stronger than fresh emissions from nominal combustion. The PAH mass fractions decreased upon aging due to chemical degradation. Dark aging increased genotoxicity, reduced viability and reduced release of inflammatory markers. These differences were statistically significant for single doses and typically less pronounced. We hypothesize that the alterations in toxicity upon simulated dark aging in the atmosphere may be caused by reaction products that form when PAHs and other organic compounds react with ozone and nitrate radicals.

  • 12.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Particle emissions from residential wood and biodiesel combustion2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions from anthropogenic combustion sources, such as vehicles and biomass combustion, contribute significantly to ambient particulate matter (PM) both on a local and global scale. Exposure to ambient PM and air pollution in general is linked to a variety of different health effects and it has been estimated that as many as 2.1 million premature deaths each year, due to cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer, are caused by the changes in anthropogenic air pollution since pre-industrial times. There is today still a lack of information regarding the emissions of different specific particulate emission components, e.g. soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oxy-PAHs combined with details about the behaviour of different fuels under varying combustion conditions. The overall objective of this work was to provide new knowledge regarding physical and chemical properties of PM from solid and liquid biofuels, which are important for the viewpoint of human health and atmospheric pollution. This was achieved by experimental studies of the combustion of biomass using a residential wood stove and by introducing biodiesel to an off-road engine, thereby investigating two major emission sources for PM and gaseous emissions.

    From the two papers regarding biodiesel included in this thesis, it can be concluded that the introduction of the biodiesel, and potentially other renewable fuels, can in a considerable way change the exhaust particle emissions. This could have implications for the assessment of exhaust from engines running on biodiesel fuels, especially when introducing biodiesel in existing and older engines.

    The results from the wood combustion research performed showed some important considerations regarding both specific particle properties and the influences of different burning conditions and fuels. One major finding, based on several of the included studies, was that a proper operation of a wood stove is of major importance to avoid unfavourable burning condition and elevated emissions of soot and organic particles, regardless of the wood species used. Some specific occasions during the burning phases in batch wise wood combustion were also identified as important for the overall emissions. The results from this research has given new specific insights into the emissions from wood stoves and should be of relevance for both technological development of residential appliances, emission testing/certification, information to users and legislation.

  • 13.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Evaluation of a novel chamber setup for human exposures of biomass combustion aerosolsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a vast number of epidemiological studies there is today a consensus that increased concentrations of ambient particulate matter air pollution cause adverse health effects such as mortality, hospitalizations, cardiovascular events, respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. The use of controlled laboratory studies with human exposure chambers can give unique opportunities to directly examine specific exposure conditions and cause-effect relationship with relevant concentrations and particle types. In this paper, the design of a novel chamber setup for human exposures of biomass combustion aerosols is described with an evaluation of the systems function under different conditions (e.g. air exchange rates and target PM1 concentrations). Several different research biomass combustion systems are available in combination with extensive and advanced monitoring and characterization of the gaseous and particle emissions used for exposures. Examples, with data from three performed human exposure campaigns, are included and discussed as a basis for the evaluation of the whole setup, with the target to generate stable conditions in the chamber using different kinds of biomass combustion aerosols. Based on the evaluation of function and present exposure experiences it can be concluded that the chamber setup and biomass aerosol generation systems is able to produce a stable aerosol concentration in the chamber of different particle types.  Overall, the human exposure setup for biomass combustion aerosols together with the integrated biomass combustion laboratory gives extensive possibilities for designing different whole body human exposure studies for a variety of biomass combustion aerosols as well as other experimental aerosol research.

  • 14.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindgren, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Avagyan, Rozanna
    Westerholm, Roger
    Lundstedt, Staffan
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Influence of wood species and burning conditions on particle emission characteristics in a residential wood stoveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions from small scale residential biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM) air pollution, and the performance of stoves, boilers and fireplaces have been shown to be influenced both by fuel properties, technology and user behaviour (firing procedures). Still, rather scarce information is available regarding the relative importance of these variables for the particle characteristics and emissions of different particulate components, e.g. soot, PAH, oxy-PAH, and metals. In particular, the behaviour of different wood fuels under varying firing procedures and combustion conditions, has not been studied thoroughly. The objective of this work was therefore to elucidate the influence of wood species and combustion conditions on particle emission characteristics in a typical Nordic residential wood stove. The emissions from four different wood species were investigated at two controlled combustion conditions including nominal and high burn rates, with focus on physical and chemical properties of the fine particulate matter. Considerably elevated carbonaceous particle emissions (soot and organics) was found during high burn rate conditions, associated with a shift in particle number size distribution towards a higher fraction of larger particles. In some cases, as here seen for pine, the specific fuel properties can affect the combustion performance and thereby also influence particle and PAH emissions. For the inorganic ash particles, the content in the fuel, and not burning condition, was found to be the main determining factor as seen by the increased emissions of alkali salts for aspen. For the first time, wood stove emission data on 11 specific oxy-PAHs together with 45 PAH was combined with controlled variations of burning conditions and fuels. The oxy-PAH/PAH ratio during high burn rate was found to increase, suggesting an enrichment of particulate oxy-PAH, information that can be of relevance when assessing the toxicological properties of the PM. Accordingly, the main influence on emission performance and particle characteristics was seen between different burn rates, and this study clearly illustrates the major importance of proper operation to avoid unfavorable burning condition regardless of the wood species used.

  • 15.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindgren, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Avagyan, Rozanna
    Westerholm, Roger
    Lundstedt, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Influence of Wood Species and Burning Conditions on Particle Emission Characteristics in a Residential Wood Stove2017In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 5514-5524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions from small-scale residential biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM) air pollution, and the performance of stoves, boilers, and fireplaces have been shown to be influenced both by fuel properties, technology, and user behavior (firing procedures). Still, rather scarce information is available regarding the relative importance of these variables for the particle characteristics and emissions of different particulate components, e.g., soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oxy-PAH, and metals. In particular, the behavior of different wood fuels under varying firing procedures and combustion conditions has not been studied thoroughly. Therefore, the objective of this work was to elucidate the influence of wood species and combustion conditions on particle emission characteristics in a typical Nordic residential wood stove. The emissions from four different wood species were investigated at two controlled combustion conditions, including nominal and high burn rates, with a focus on physical and chemical properties of the fine particulate matter. Considerably elevated carbonaceous particle emissions (soot and organics) were found during high burn rate conditions, which were associated with a shift in particle number size distribution toward a higher fraction of larger particles. In some cases, as here seen for pine, the specific fuel properties can affect the combustion performance and thereby also influence particle and PAH emissions. For the inorganic ash particles, the content in the fuel, and not burning conditions, was found to be the main determining factor, as seen by the increased emissions of alkali salts for aspen. Wood stove emission data on 11 specific oxy-PAHs, together with 45 PAHs, were combined with controlled variations of burning conditions and fuels. The oxy-PAH/PAH ratio during a high burn rate was observed to increase, suggesting an enrichment of particulate oxy-PAH. Accordingly, the main influence on emission performance and particle characteristics was seen between different burn rates, and this study clearly illustrates the major importance of proper operation to avoid unfavorable burning condition, regardless of the wood species used.

  • 16.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, EZ
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    A novel set-up for source characterization and human exposures of biomass combustion aerosols2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Effects of dilution conditions on particle formation and size distribution in engine exhaust emissions when introducing biodiesel in comparison to standard petro dieselManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Air pollution, in particular ambient particulate matter (PM), can be linked to a variety of different health effects, and a major contributor to the PM pollution is exhaust from diesel engines and other vehicles. In the global drive towards finding sustainable and clean bio-based alternative fuels for the transport sector, biodiesel is one of the most established alternative. However, there is considerable variation in emission data for biodiesel, preferably explained by influences of engine technology and operating conditions as well as dilution sampling strategy. In this study the focus was therefore to study the effects of dilution conditions on the particle formation and size distribution in the exhaust emissions from an off road engine, when introducing RME biodiesel in comparison to standard petro diesel. Particle size distribution and number concentration were measured on-line with the use of a fast mobility spectrometer, during a transient operation and without engine modification. Differences in particle characteristics were elucidated in the raw exhaust versus diluted exhaust at two subsequent sampling points with different dilution ratios. In addition, the influences on the exhaust particle properties of changing the lubrication oil was investigated. It was found that biodiesel in general generated more nucleation mode particles then petro diesel, and after the oil exchange the total particle number concentration was increased even more. It was also seen that the custom-built dilution setup favors generation of nucleation mode particles, which is in line with real life conditions in chase and road side experiments. However, when using heated primary dilution and a heated line in the raw exhaust the formation of nucleation mode particles was suppressed. Overall, it was concluded that the introduction of the biodiesel, and potentially other renewable fuels, can in a considerable way change the exhaust particle emission and characteristics. This could have implications for the assessment of exhaust from engines running on biodiesel fuels, especially when introducing biodiesel in existing and older engines.

  • 18.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Ahmed, Trifa M.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Koegler, Johannes H.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Physical and chemical properties of RME biodiesel exhaust particles without engine modifications2016In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 186, p. 261-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major contributor to ambient particulate air pollution is exhaust from diesel engines and other vehicles, which can be linked to different adverse health effects. During the last decades, a global drive towards finding sustainable and clean bio-based alternative fuels for the transport sector has taken place and biodiesel is one of the most established alternatives today. To better assess the overall effects on a public health level when introducing biodiesel and other renewable fuels, a better understanding of the detailed exhaust particle properties, is needed. In this work, the physical and chemical properties of biodiesel exhaust particles were studied in comparison to standard diesel exhaust emissions, in an existing engine without modifications, focusing on particulate carbonaceous matter and PAH/Oxy-PAH as well as fine particle size distribution. An older off-road engine, produced between 1996 and 2004, was used with three different fuels/fuel blends; (1) 100 wt% low-sulfur standard petro diesel (SD), (2) 100 wt% rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel (B100) and (3) a blended fuel – B30 consisting of 30 wt% RME and 70 wt% SD. The study focused mainly on emissions from transient engine operation, but includes also idling conditions. The gaseous emissions measured for the biodiesel fuel were in general in accordance with previous reported data in the literature, and compared to the standard petro diesel the emissions of CO was lower while NOx emissions increased. The particulate mass concentration during transient operation was almost halved compared to when petro diesel was used and this was associated with a decrease in average particle size. The shift in particle mass and size was associated with a higher fraction of organic matter in general, considerable less PAH’s but a relative higher fraction of Oxy-PAH’s, when shifting from petro diesel to biodiesel.

  • 19.
    Nyström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    ept. of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University.
    Trifa, Mohammad Ahmed
    Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University.
    Roger, Westerholm
    ept. of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University.
    Koegler, Jan
    Volvo Group Trucks Technology, ATR, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mudway, Ian S
    4MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Biomedical Sciences, King’s College London, UK.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Properties of biodiesel exhaust particles from two non-road engines2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ohlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Yang, Bin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Örebro universitet.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Stable carbon isotope labelled carbon dioxide as tracer gas for air change rate measurement in a ventilated single zone2017In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 115, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has often been used as tracer gas for measurement of the air change rate l (h1 ) in buildings. In such measurements, a correction is required for the presence of indoor CO2, which commonly consists of atmospheric CO2 mixed with human respired CO2. Here, 13C isotope-labelled CO2 was employed as tracer gas, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) was used for simultaneous measurement of the two isotope analogues 12CO2 and 13CO2. This enabled the simultaneous measurement of the 13CO2 tracer gas, with correction for background 13CO2, and the concentration of indoor CO2, allowing for presence of occupants. The background correction procedure assumes that the isotope delta of the background indoor CO2 equals dB ¼ 19‰, based on the prior information that the carbon isotope ratio RB ¼ 13C/12C of all carbon in the bio-geosphere of earth is in the interval 0.010900 < RB < 0.011237. Evidence supported that l could be accurately measured, using the new 13CO2 tracer method, even when the background 13CO2 concentration varied during the measurement time interval, or when the actual dB value differed from the assumed value. The measurement uncertainty for l was estimated at 3%. Uncertainty in l due to uncertainty in RB, uRB(l), was estimated to increase with a decreasing amount of 13CO2 tracer. This indicated that at least 4 ppm tracer must be used, in order to obtain uRB(l)/l < 2%. The temporal resolution of the l measurement was 1.25/l h.

  • 21.
    Unosson, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kabele, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University.
    Mudway, Ian
    King's College London.
    Purdie, Esme
    King's College London.
    Raftis, Jennifer
    University of Edinburgh.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    University of Edinburgh.
    Newby, David E
    University of Edinburgh.
    Langrish, Jeremy P
    University of Edinburgh.
    Bosson, Jenny A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rapeseed Methyl Ester Biodiesel Exhaust Exposure Causes Vascular Dysfunction in ManManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Unosson, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Mills, Nicholas L.
    Newby, David E.
    Langrish, Jeremy P.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans2013In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 10, p. 20-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods: Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314 +/- 38 mu g/m(3)) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results: Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions: Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease.

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