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  • 1.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Here and now: Foundations and practice of human-experiential design2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis claims that an experiential approach to design really does promise the possibility of scientific design of everyday life. The purpose of this thesis is to show the promise. René Descartes conceptualized the classical formulation of a mind-body dichotomy. Various resulting and unbalanced dichotomies, such as subjective-objective, internal-external, experiential-practical and so on, raise serious concerns surrounding the concept of design. The thesis raises a crucial issue about the imbalance between technological and human concerns in the context of human-computer interaction, an imbalance that has been caused partly by the mechanistic aspect of informatics and its impact on designing human computer interaction. The thesis first explores the origin of design as a distinct activity during the industrial revolution, and reviews the tide of design history from then until today. The brief review of design history indicates that design is not merely the skill of making things or presentations. This gives direction to how design can be positioned in our modern information society. Second, the author starts a critical discussion about ordinary design approaches that, it is suggested, may have hindered true human-centred design, and then introduces an alternative approach to design and research, which the author calls Human-Experiential Design. Third, the notion of Tangible Presence in Blended Reality Space is introduced. The conceptual grounding that illustrates the experiential approach to interaction design is discussed. Fourth, the thesis presents use cases and provides examples of Human-Experiential Design in specific practical contexts. The concrete examples suggest that the emphasis on ‘balance’ or appropriate blending is very important in the development of better interactive systems for health, capitalizing on seamless combinations of the virtual and the physical in Blended Reality Space. As exemplified in the thesis, the human-experiential approach, striving for optimal combinations of tangibility and evoked presence, offers a promising tool in designing for special needs groups such as elderly people with some cognitive weaknesses, and children undertaking physical rehabilitation programmes. It is suggested that such virtual-physical blends will release human beings from the strain that existing perceived dichotomies bring. Finally, the author concludes by offering a way forward, a way that is neither subjective nor objective but rather a meaningfully integrated blend of the dichotomies, which responds to the question of what it means to be human.

  • 2.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Reframing dichotomies: human experiential design of healthcare technologies2011In: Human-centered design of e-health technologies: concepts, methods and applications / [ed] Martina Ziefle (RWTH Aachen University, Germany); Carsten Röcker (RWTH Aachen University, Germany), Hershey PA, United States: IGI Global , 2011, p. 65-93Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic healthcare technologies support the interaction between patients and health-service providers, institution-to-institution transmission of data, and peer-to-peer communication between patients and health professionals. These technologies promise to deliver significant improvements in access to care, quality of care, and the efficiency and productivity of the health sector.Human-Centered Design of E-Health Technologies: Concepts, Methods and Applications unites researchers and industry practitioners from different disciplines to share their domain-specific knowledge and thereby contribute to a holistic introduction into the area of human-centered design for e-health applications. The knowledge and insights provided in this book will help students, as well as systems designers, to understand the fundamental social and technical requirements future e-health systems have to meet. By providing a well-rounded introduction within one single volume, this book is equally suited as a library reference and upper-level course supplement, but also represents a first-class resource for independent study.

  • 3.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Bridging the contextual reality gap in blended reality space: the case of AGNES2011In: Include 2011 Proceedings: the role of inclusive design in making social innovation happen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores where the contextual reality gap emerges in social sharing of knowledge, understanding and experience generated between users (also between a designer and a user) in different contexts. It then examines how this 'contextual reality gap' can be bridged effectively in the sharing of meaning through mediated communication within emergent virtual/physical space, in what we call Blended Reality Space. As a concrete example, we refer to our current project, AGNES, developing User-sensitive Home-based Systems for Successful Ageing in a Networked Society, funded under the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) Joint programme. Finally, we propose a conceptual framework for managing, structuring and composing contexts in designing interactive systems, a new approach we refer to as the Contextual Reality Framework.

  • 4.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Pesola, Ulla-Maija
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Tools, Perspectives and Avatars in Blended Reality Space2009In: Annual Review of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine 2009: Advanced Technologies in the Behavioral, Social and Neurosciences / [ed] Brenda K Wiederhold and Giuseppe Riva, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2009, p. 91-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blended Reality Space is our term for an interactive mixed-reality environment where the physical and the virtual are intimately combined ill the service of interaction goals and communication environments aimed at health support and rehabilitation. The present study examines the effect on rated presence and self-presence of three key factors in the way blended realities may be implemented for these purposes. Our findings emphasize the importance of tangibility for presence, but suggest that presence and self-presence are unrelated phenomena. These findings will be incorporated into design principles for our planned work to develop free movement-based interactions for motor rehabilitation as well as blended-reality spaces for collaboration between hospitals, care organizations, and the home.

  • 5.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Effective collaboration for healthcare by bridging the reality gap across media-physical spaces2008In: PETRA: 1st International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments,: Athens, July 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Tangible presence in blended reality space2009In: Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Workshop on Presence, 2009, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss issues relating to presence arising from the recent evolution of tangible interaction techniques as an alternative interaction paradigm to the familiar WIMP-based Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The intersection of sensory, cognitive and also emotional aspects in such interfaces takes us a significant step further than GUI techniques. We introduce our concept of Tangible Presence in Blended Reality Space, and its study as an emerging weaving of HCI and presence research. An experimental study is then described, which examined the influence of three key factors in the way blended realities may be implemented: tangibility, viewpoint and avatar identity. The study examined the effect of manipulations of these factors on rated presence and self-presence. Our findings emphasize the importance of tangibility for presence, but suggest that presence and self-presence are unrelated phenomena. Finally, as critical concerns in future work to design and implement blended reality spaces for a variety of purposes, context sensitivity and usability issues are discussed.

  • 7.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing blended reality space: conceptual foundations and applications2011In: The 25th British Computer Society Conference on Human Computer Interaction – HCI2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper starts with a crucial discussion about the imbalance between technological and human concerns in the context of human-computer interaction, an imbalance that has arisen partly from the mechanistic aspect and its impact on interaction design. We then introduce the concept of Blended Reality Space, interactive mixed reality environments where the physical and the virtual are seamlessly combined and affect each other. The conceptual grounding and practical examples that illustrate our approach to interaction design are then discussed, adopting a standard figurative representation of blends. This helps understanding the role of blending that meaningfully bridges unbalanced separations between cognition and action, and the physical and the virtual. As a concrete example, the AGNES project, which is aimed at developing “user sensitive home-based systems for successful ageing in a networked society”, is introduced. We believe that the emphasis on ʻbalanceʼ or appropriate blending is very important in the development of better interactive systems for health, capitalizing on seamless combinations of the virtual and the physical in Blended Reality Space.

  • 8.
    Peter, Christian
    et al.
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Kreiner, Andreas
    Modernfamilies.net GmbH, Linz, Austria.
    Schröter, Martin
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Kim, Hyosun
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Beiber, Gerald
    Fraunhofer IGD, Rostock, Germany.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Ballesteros, Soladad
    Facultad de Psicologia, UNED, Madrid, Spain.
    AGNES: connecting people in a multimodal way2013In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 229-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western societies are confronted with a number of challenges caused by the increasing number of older citizens. One important aspect is the need and wish of older people to live as long as possible in their own home and maintain an independent life. As people grew older, their social networks disperse, with friends and families moving to other parts of town, other cities or even countries. Additionally, people become less mobile with age, leading to less active participation in societal life. Combined, this normal, age-related development leads to increased loneliness and social isolation of older people, with negative effects on mental and physical health of those people. In the AGNES project, a home-based system has been developed that allows connecting elderly with their families, friends and other significant people over the Internet. As most older people have limited experience with computers and often special requirements on technology, one focus of AGNES was to develop with the users novel technological means for interacting with their social network. The resulting system uses ambient displays, tangible interfaces and wearable devices providing ubiquitous options for interaction with the network, and secondary sensors for additionally generating carefully chosen information on the person to be relayed to significant persons. Evaluations show that the chosen modalities for interaction are well adopted by the users. Further it was found that use of the AGNES system had positive effects on the mental state of the users, compared to the control group without the technology.

  • 9.
    Sandlund, Marlene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lindh Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Häger-Ross, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    A conceptual framework for design of interactive computer play in rehabilitation of children with sensorimotor disorders2009In: Physical Therapy Reviews, ISSN 1083-3196, E-ISSN 1743-288X, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 348-354Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Waterworth, John
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Hoshi, Kei
    School of Art, Architecture and Design, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Human-experiential design of presence in everyday blended reality: living in the here and now2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores how our lives and social interactions have become split between two intertwined, but not integrated, realities: the physical and the digital. Our sense of presence in the here and now has become fragmented, and yet earlier design approaches reinforced the problem, rather than leading to improvements. The authors address these issues by laying out a new human computer interaction (HCI) design approach – human-experiential design – rooted in a return to first principles of how people understand the world, both consciously and unconsciously. The application of this approach to the design of blended reality spaces is described in detail. Examples and scenarios of designing them to overcome the problems inherent in a variety of mixed reality settings are provided.

    Human-Experiential Design of Presence in Everyday Blended Reality will appeal to undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in interaction design, psychology, HCI and computer application studies, as well as practicing interaction designers and computer professionals. It will also be of interest to communication, media and urban design students, and to all readers with an interest in the technology-mediated future.

1 - 10 of 10
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