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  • 1.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Journeymen or traditional emigrants?: Norwegian and Swedish engineers and architects in North America, 1880-19302011In: Norwegians and Swedes in the United States: friends & neighbors / [ed] Philip J. Anderson & Dag Blanck, St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press , 2011, p. 197-218Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Review of: Donald Harman Akenson, Ireland, Sweden and the Great European migration 1815–1914. McGill-Queen's studies in ethnic history, series two, number 302014In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 96-98Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Sweden, migration 19th century to present2013In: The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration / [ed] Immanuel Ness & Peter Bellwood, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The view of preindustrial Sweden as a geographically static society is distorted; migration was a part of everyday life and the most common demographic feature. Early 19th-century Swedes changed residence 10 times on average during their lifetime, which is only twice less than the present day. Distances moved were shorter, however. People moved between their closest rural parishes and sometimes to nearby towns. On the parish level, in- and outmigration equaled each other and did not cause major population redistributions. Numerous small and isolated local “labour markets” constituted migration's framework. People moved to earn their living within these borders (Tedebrand 1999; Dribe & Stanfors 2005).

  • 4.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    The Peregrine Profession : International Mobility of Nordic Engineers and Architects, 1880-1930.2014Book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    The welcoming city?: Immigrants in urban Sweden 1850-19252010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to examine the lives of late nineteenth and early twentieth century immigrants in the Swedish capital of Stockholm and the cities of Linköping and Sundsvall. These urban areas were of different sizes, geographical locations and socio-economic structures. One important question revolves around how these characteristics interacted with immigrant integration in the local societies. The relevance of the hypothesis suggesting that immigration differs with the size of the receiving community is discussed: it is generally assumed that larger cities offer immigrants better development possibilities and more opportunities to participate in societal life than smaller towns do. Another purpose is to study whether, and in what way, integration differed with the immigrants’ origin, gender, age as well as social and marital status when arriving. The cultural proximity in general and the linguistic in particular, ought to have facilitated the integration process for Finland-Swedes, Norwegians, and Danes in comparison with other immigrant groups. The study is based on computerised source material from the Demographic Database at Umeå University and the Stockholm Historical Database, the latter provided by the Stockholm City Archives. The databases are complemented with Swedish parish records. Taking the point of departure in persons moving directly from abroad to the four urban areas between 1860 and 1915, the immigrants are followed as long as they remain in the areas. Integration is measured through different variables: permanent settlement, naturalisation, marriages and occupational changes. The “degree” of integration is interpreted as increasing if an immigrant settled “for good”, accepted Swedish citizenship and experienced upward social mobility. If an unmarried immigrant married a native, it is also viewed as positively correlated with integration.

  • 6. Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Åter till vardagen?: livet efter hemkomsten för återvändare till Gävle och Voxnadalen, 1875-19202004In: Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift för Lars-Göran Tedebrand / [ed] Anders Brändström, Sören Edvinsson, Tom Ericsson och Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2004, p. 257-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Lundh Nilsson, Fay
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Desirable skills?: Non-Nordic citizens applying for work permits in Sweden, 1947–19502015In: Labor history, ISSN 0023-656X, E-ISSN 1469-9702, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 481-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden's rapid economic growth after the Second World War meant that the native labour supply was incapable of meeting the high demand, especially for industrial labourers. Three agreements on organised collective transfers were signed, but a large majority of the labour migrants came on their own initiative. Not all applicants were equally welcomed. In this article, logistic regressions are used to investigate a sample of 2830 (every fifth) applications to the National Labour Market Board (AMS) from the years 1947–1950; 1367 had an arrangement with a future Swedish employer, while 1463 applicants lacked such an arrangement. The likelihood of being granted a permit was 11 times higher for the first category. Our hypothesis that the chances were better for high-skilled workers proved true only in part; it was valid if they had an employer agreement. Contrary to our assumptions, women had a better chance than men, partly because domestic servants were always permitted and partly because women did not compete with male labour. However, our assumptions with regard to better chances for the young but experienced, and for those applying for the occupation wherein they had their experience held true. A number of official documents revealed the desirability of Sudeten German labourers. They were viewed as skilled, reliable and loyal by employers, labour unions and governmental authorities. This assumption only held true for applicants lacking an employer. This can be viewed as a prolongation of the practice of helping Sudeten German Social Democrats, established in 1938. The intention to help refugees was, however, also evident in the treatment of Baltic and Polish applicants.

  • 8.
    Lundh Nilsson, Fay
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Lund University.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Mogen, vuxen och med nya perspektiv: Utlandspraktik vid sex svenska industrigymnasier2014In: Yrkesutbildning för morgondagens arbetsliv / [ed] Alexandru Panican & Jonas Olofsson, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Puschmann, Paul
    et al.
    Centre for Sociological Research, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Schumacher, Reto
    University of Geneva.
    Matthijs, Koen
    Centre for Sociological Research, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Access to marriage and reproduction among migrants in Antwerp and Stockholm. A longitudinal approach to processes of social inclusion and exclusion, 1846–19262014In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 29-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longitudinal approach is used to describe and explain processes of social inclusion and exclusion among different groups of migrants in Antwerp and Stockholm (1846–1926), in terms of access to marriage and reproduction. In this way we want to get a better idea about the factors which facilitated or hampered the social inclusion of migrants upon arrival in two different Western European port cities. The results of the discrete time event history analyses show that social inclusion of migrants was easier in Antwerp and became easier over time, while in Stockholm it was more difficult and became even more complicated over time. This finding might be interpreted as the result of greater societal openness in Antwerp, as the Belgian port-city's economic success depended largely upon foreigners and international trade. Higher odds for social inclusion in Antwerp might also have been related to differences in the chances of finding an urban niche, which in turn might have been a result of disparities in economic and demographic growth. Most likely it was a combination of differences in the local opportunity structure and the level of societal openness. Furthermore, it was found that region and place of birth, age at arrival, historical time period, and, in the case of Stockholm, gender and social class had an important impact on the chances of successful inclusion.

  • 10.
    Puschmann, Paul
    et al.
    Belgium.
    Van den Driessche, Nina
    Belgium.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Van de Putte, Bart
    Belgium.
    Matthijs, Koen
    Belgium.
    From Outsiders to Insiders?: Partner Choice and Marriage among Internal Migrants in Antwerp, Rotterdam a Stockholm, 1850-19302015In: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, ISSN 0172-6404, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 319-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Von Aussenseitem zu Etablierten? Partnerwahl und Heirat unter inleindischen Migranten in Antwerpen, Rotterdam und Stockholm, 1850-1930". Processes of social inclusion and exclusion among internal migrants in Antwerp, Rotterdam and Stockholm in the period 1850-1930 are studied with the help of data on partner choice and marriage of migrants who moved to these cities as singles. In practice, four outcomes related to meeting and mating are linked in our conceptual model to four acculturation trajectories, which form together a sliding scale in terms of social in- and exclusion. The models were tested by means of logistic regression. The results show that in all three cities social exclusion was a widespread phenomenon, and that only a small minority of the migrants became fully incorporated into urban mainstream society. Social exclusion was highly related to cultural differences between migrants and natives. Economic capital did not reduce the migrants' risk of facing marginalization, but it did facilitate the crossing of group boundaries for a specific group of migrants who were able to escape marginalization. The fact that social inclusion took place on a larger scale in Antwerp and Rotterdam compared to Stockholm suggests that large port cities facilitated the incorporation of migrants more than industrial cities.

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