umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Augustsson, Nils-Petter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Persson, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The character of a VR -visualization2003In: Proceedings of the 26th International Systems Research in Scandinavia (IRIS)Conference, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When we humans are dealing with complex things in our daily lives, for example an artifact, we tend to ascribe different characters to it. This is our way of getting a quick overview of the artifact and makes it understandable to us. The ascribing of character is not based on thorough examination of the object at hand though, but rather on a certain thing, i.e. a characteristic that catches our attention. This characteristic gives us a certain feeling about the artifact and makes it possible for us to make a judgment about it, even if it is a snap one. With this as a starting point we try to identify the different characteristics, which constitute the overall character, i.e. realism. In many visualisations with this objective, realism is juxtaposed with copying static structures, i.e. buildings and streets. This is also a strong contributor to the realism character in the Botnia-track visualisation. In our opinion this is not enough to get a realistic character. We have identified a few other prominent characteristics that also are important contributors to the realism character, for example landmarks, sound, moving objects and narrator voice. Our main conclusion is that if a realistic character is desirable, more than visualisation of static structures is necessary. We found at least five additional characteristics that influence people’s perception of a virtualisation; landmarks, sound, moving objects and narrator voice. In our opinion, all of these are important for a realistic character to emerge and something that designers have to take in to consideration to reach the intended goal.

  • 2. Bardzell, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Developing a "Sensibility for the Particular": Coping with the Scale and Dynamics of Participatory Culture”.2007In: Internet Research 8.0: Let's Play, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining Practical, Everyday Theory Use in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how theories (as objects) are used in articles published in Design Studies. While theory and theory construction have been given time and attention in the literature, less is known about how researchers put theories to work in their written texts about practical, everyday theory use. In the present paper, we examine 32 articles and synthesize six models of theory use based on our examination.

  • 4. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 199-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about designerly knowledge and designerly ways of knowing in the professions, less has been written about the production and presentation of knowledge in the design discipline. In the present paper, we examine the possibility that knowledge claims might be an effective way to distinguish the design discipline from other disciplines. We compare the kinds of knowledge claims made in journal publications from the natural sciences, social sciences, and design. And we find that natural and social science publications tend to make singular knowledge claims of similar kinds whereas design publications often contain multiple knowledge claims of different kinds. We raise possible explanations for this pattern and its implications for design research. Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research.

  • 5. Blevis, Eli
    et al.
    Lim, Youn
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Using Design Critique as Research to link Sustainability and Interactive Technologies2007In: Proceedings of HCII 2007: Online Communities and Social Computing: Lecture Notes in Computer Science L.N.C.S., 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Blevis, Eli
    et al.
    Lim, youn
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Vetting-Wolf, Tracy
    Sato, K.
    Supporting Design Studio Culture in HCI.2007In: ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors and Computing Systems,, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Blevis, Eli
    et al.
    Indiana University, USA.
    Lim, Youn-kyung
    Indiana University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Human Computer Interaction Design Program, School of Informatics, Indiana University.
    Makice, Kevin
    The Iterative Design of a Virtual Design Studio2008In: TechTrends, ISSN 8756-3894, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 74-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our journey in the development of the Design eXchange has taken us a long way and there is a long way yet to go. We began with a vision for encoding design knowledge and creating online virtual design studio culture and found the wiki technology to be an exciting way to make progress towards many of our goals. On the other hand, our use of the wiki technology has itself inspired us to think differently about our original goals for the Design eXchange. Especially as a result of our experience with the wikis, we now realize the importance of allowing for analogies of public and private spaces in the virtual world to reflect physical world design culture and practice. We have understood the need for an ecology of wikis to support communities of virtual design studios and we have understood the need for thinking deeply about permissions in order to create circles of influence and awareness among designers in our online community.

  • 8. Blevis, Eli
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Ensoulment and Sustainable Interaction Design2007In: Proceedings for IASDR 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bradzell, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Indiana University Bloomington, USA.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Indiana University Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University Bloomington, USA.
    Reading Critical Designs: Supporting Reasoned Interpretations of Critical Design2014In: CHI '14: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014, p. 1951-1960Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical Design has emerged as an important concept in HCI research and practice. Yet researchers have noted that its uptake has been limited by certain lacks of intellectual infrastructure theories, methodologies, canons and exemplars, and a community of practice. We argue that one way to create this infrastructure is to cultivate a community adept at reading that is, critically interpreting and making reasoned judgments about critical designs. We propose an approach to developing close readings of critical designs, which are both evidence-based and carefully reasoned. The approach highlights analytical units of analysis, the relevance of design languages and social norms, and the analytical contemplation of critical aspects of a design. It is intended to be relatively easy to learn, to try out, and to teach, in the hopes of inviting more members of the HCI community to engage in this practice. We exemplify the approach with readings of two critical designs and reflect on different ways that a design might serve a critical purpose or offer a critical argument about design, society, and the future.

  • 10.
    Croon, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Everyday Aesthetics and  Design of Information Technology2003In: Techne: Design aesthetics: die frage über technik, Barcelona, Spain: University of Barcelona, Spain , 2003, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Everyday Aesthetics and Design of Information Technology2003In: Proceedings of 5th European Academy of Design Conference (EAD): TECHNE - Design Wisdom, Barcelona, Spain: University of Barcelona , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University at Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
    Establishing Criteria of Rigor and Relevance in Interaction Design Research2010In: Proceedings of Create 10: The Interaction Design Conference (June-July, Napier University: Edinburgh, UK)., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has rapidly evolved into a unique discipline embracing practicing professionals, design educators, and academic researchers. As with many evolving disciplines, attracting attention from a large number of people with different backgrounds, interests, and ways of seeing tends to cause ‘disciplinary anxiety’, which inevitably leads to the question of what constitutes ‘good research’. What is rigorous and relevant interaction design research? How do we recognize and evaluate it? In this paper, we argue that most current attempts at dealing with issues of rigor and relevance in interaction design research tend to be on loan from other disciplines, and tend to overlook, conceal, or knowingly exclude some of what makes interaction design research such a unique field. Our primary contribution is that what may be perceived as three different design research activities—design practice, design exploration, and design studies—have their own purposes, intended outcomes, and internal logic. Each form of research must thus be examined in its own right and the notions of rigor and relevance for each of them have to be based on a firm understanding of the particular purpose of each approach. We would argue that this is not done consistently in the field today, which leads to misunderstandings, confusion, and mistakes when interaction design research is reviewed, discussed, and assessed.

  • 13.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University.
    Establishing criteria of rigour and relevance in interaction design research2010In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research is a unique discipline embracing practicing professionals, design educators and academic researchers, but attracting attention from people with different backgrounds and interests has lead to the question of what constitutes ‘good research’. What is rigorous and relevant interaction design research and how do we recognise and evaluate it? Most current attempts at dealing with these issues tend to be on loan from other disciplines, and may overlook, conceal, or knowingly exclude some of what makes interaction design research such a unique field. Our primary contribution is that what may be perceived as three different design research activities—design practice, design exploration and design studies—have their own purposes, intended outcomes, and internal logic. Each approach must be examined in its own right and the notions of rigour and relevance have to be based on a firm understanding of the particular purpose of each approach

  • 14.
    Gray, Colin M.
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Siegel, Martin A.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Reprioritizing the Relationship Between HCI Research and Practice: Bubble-Up and Trickle-Down Effects2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 725-734Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an ongoing conversation about the role and relationship of theory and practice in the HCI community. This paper explores this relationship privileging a practice perspective through a tentative model, which describes a “bubble-up” of ideas from practice to inform research and theory development, and an accompanying “trickle-down” of theory into practice. Interviews were conducted with interaction designers, which included a description of their use of design methods in practice, and their knowledge and use of two common design methods—affinity diagramming and the concept of affordance. Based on these interviews, potential relationships between theory and practice are explored through this model. Disseminating agents already common in HCI practice are addressed as possible  mechanisms for the research community to understand practice more completely.  pportunities for future research, based

    on the use of the tentative model in a generative way, are

    considered.

  • 15.
    Hermans, Guido
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University.
    Exploring Parametric Design: Consumer Customization of an Everyday Object2012In: Proceedings of DRS2012 / [ed] Praima Israsena, Juthamas Tangsantikul, David Durling, Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University , 2012, p. 707-717Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toolkits for mass customization can be seen as a link between a consumer and a solution space and enable the user to customize a design to their own needs and desires. The development and increasing availability of additive manufacturing which enables customization and the growing amount of businesses developing mass customization services will direct industrial designers to rethink their role and their tasks in the design process. Customization through digital fabrication technologies is an emerging field where industrial designers have to be aware of and able to design for. There is an ongoing shift from standardization and mass production towards individualization, markets of one and customization. The aim of this exploratory study is to get a better understanding of toolkits for mass customization in order to develop a method for designing customizable products. The experiment conducted in this study invited participants to customize, use and evaluate a kitchen product. We present five core findings from this experiment. This study has identified several issues that play a role when consumers take on the task of customizing a consumer product. The study has also shown potential future areas when it comes to parametric design.

  • 16.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Creativity, Communication and Systems Design Methodology1996In: Proceedings of the Nineteenth Information Systems Research Seminar In Scandinavia. Gothenburg: Department of Informatics. / [ed] Dahlbom, B, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Huang, Chung-Ching
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Temporal Anchors in User Experience Research2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 271-274Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As HCI becomes more aware of long-term use experience, users' retrospection might be one starting point to explore prior interactive use. However, due to the limitation of current methodologies and human memory, research participants might recall specific prior use episodes and less their experience over time. In this note, we examine how to encourage retrospection and reflection concerning the changes of use experience in the past and over time. We have reviewed relevant research and traced the usage of temporal references in those studies, such as diagrams of use measurement over time or the history of interactive products. We propose the notion of temporal anchors as way of capturing and grounding temporal aspects of long-term use experience. We have found that methods that include temporal anchors have facilitated opportunities for rich reflections and communications around use experience and temporality.

  • 18.
    Jacobsson, Markus
    et al.
    Indiana University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wetzel, S
    Yang, L
    Love and authentication2008In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2008, p. 197-200Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University.
    Complex interaction2010In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 17, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An almost explosive growth of complexity puts pressure on people in their everyday doings. Digital artifacts and systems are at the core of this development. How should we handle complexity aspects when designing new interactive devices and systems? In this article we begin an analysis of interaction complexity. We portray different views of complexity; we explore not only negative aspects of complexity, but also positive, making a case for the existence of benign complexity. We argue that complex interaction is not necessarily bad, but designers need a deeper understanding of interaction complexity and need to treat it in a more intentional and thoughtful way. We examine interaction complexity as it relates to different loci of complexity: internal,external, and mediated complexity. Our purpose with these analytical exercises is to pave the way for design that is informed by a more focused and precise understanding of interaction complexity.

  • 20.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington.
    Faceless Interaction - A Conceptual Examination of the Notion of Interface: past, present and future2015In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 507-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the present struggle to keep interaction complexity in check as artifact complexity continues to rise and the technical possibilities to interact multiply, the notion of interface is scrutinized. First, a limited number of previous interpretations or thought styles of the notion are identified and discussed. This serves as a framework for an analysis of the current situation with regard to complexity, control, and interaction, leading to a realization of the crucial role of surface in contemporary understanding of interaction. The potential of faceless interaction, interaction that transcends traditional reliance on surfaces, is then examined and discussed, liberating possibilities as well as complicating effects and dangers are pointed out, ending with a sketch of a possibly emerging new thought style.

  • 21.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The character of things1997In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People, as well as things, appear to have character--high-level attributes that help us understand and relate to them. A character is a coherent set of characteristics and attributes that apply to appearance and behaviour alike, cutting across different functions, situations and value systems--esthetical, technical, ethical--providing support for anticipation, interpretation and interaction. Consistency in character may become more important than ever in the increasingly complex artifacts of our computer-supported future.

  • 22.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    The Meaning of Interactivity: Some Proposals for Definitions and Measure2017In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 103-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New interactive applications, artifacts, and systems are constantly being added to our environments, and there are some concerns in the human-computer interaction research community that increasing interactivity might not be just to the good. But what is it that is supposed to be increasing, and how could we determine whether it is? To approach these issues in a systematic and analytical fashion, relying less on common intuitions and more on clearly defined concepts and when possible quantifiable properties, we take a renewed look at the notion of interactivity and related concepts. The main contribution of this article is a number of definitions and terms, and the beginning of an attempt to frame the conditions of interaction and interactivity. Based on this framing, we also propose some possible approaches for how interactivity can be measured.

  • 23.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University Bloomington.
    Things that keep us busy: the elements of interaction2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are surrounded by interactive devices, artifacts, and systems. The general assumption is that interactivity is good -- that it is a positive feature associated with being modern, efficient, fast, flexible, and in control. Yet there is no very precise idea of what interaction is and what interactivity means. In this book, Lars-Erik Janlert and Erik Stolterman investigate the elements of interaction and how they can be defined and measured. They focus on interaction with digital artifacts and systems but draw inspiration from the broader, everyday sense of the word.

    Viewing the topic from a design perspective, Janlert and Stolterman take as their starting point the interface, which is designed to implement the interaction. They explore how the interface has changed over time, from a surface with knobs and dials to clickable symbols to gestures to the absence of anything visible. Janlert and Stolterman examine properties and qualities of designed artifacts and systems, primarily those that are open for manipulation by designers, considering such topics as complexity, clutter, control, and the emergence of an expressive-impressive style of interaction. They argue that only when we understand the basic concepts and terms of interactivity and interaction will we be able to discuss seriously its possible futures.

  • 24.
    Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Bradzell, Shaowen
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Blevis, Eli
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Pierce, James
    Carnegie Mellon University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    How Deep Is Your Love: Deep Narratives of Ensoulment and Heirloom Status2011In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our ongoing research about what it takes to design things that can be ensouled or can achieve heirloom status as a matter related to sustainable design. This paper draws on research on fifteen deep narratives that we collected to uncover detailed accounts of relationships between each participant and a single particular loved artifact or collection of a single type. Three themes emerged from our analysis of the narratives: (i) intimacy accumulated as an association with an object over time, (ii) investment of effort to learn and control functionality, and (iii) implicit values related to the patterns of collection of artifacts. In conceptualizing these three themes as an analytical frame, we arrived at two unifying notions that generally apply across many of the narratives and that serve as catalysts to design principles, namely the notion of rarity of an object, and the notion of aficionado-appeal of an object. We conclude by considering how these unifying notions can be used reflectively and judiciously to prompt design principles for interaction designers at least, and possibly as design principles in-and-of-themselves.

  • 25. Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, USA.
    Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts2017In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 53, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As materiality of interactive artifacts is diversified with integrated physical and digital materials, metaphoric design approaches in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) go beyond resembling the appearance of physical objects, exploring novel materials and forms of interactive artifacts. The hybrid materialities and forms of artifacts influence how interactivity is perceived, reframing the concept of affordances according to its evolving relationship to metaphors and materialities. By conceptualizing interactive forms in their surface, behavioral and systemic aspects, we examine multifaceted roles of metaphors in HCI from concealing and revealing a formal system to expanding and reifying its meaning; and propose a morphologic perspective on affordances as an invitation for making variations of interactive forms by compositing multiple design resources.

  • 26. Kuntz, Breanne
    et al.
    Lim, Youn
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Improving Work Through HCI: A Case Study on Information Sharing Practices2007In: Proceedings of Americas Conference on Information Systems 2007 (AMCIS 2007),, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Lim, Youn
    et al.
    Blevis, Eli
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Grand Challenges in Design Research for Human-Centered Design Informatics2007In: Proceedings of HCII 2007: Online Communities and Social Computing: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Lim, Youn
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Donaldson, Justin
    Jung, Heekyoung
    Interaction Gestalt and the Design of Aesthetic Interactions2007In: Proceedings of Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces (DPPI 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Lim, Youn-Kyung
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Tenenberg, Josh
    University of Washington, Tacoma, USA.
    The Anatomy of Prototypes: Prototypes as Filters, Prototypes as Manifestations of Design Ideas2008In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of prototypes is well established in the field of HCI and Design. A lack of knowledge, however, about the fundamental nature of prototypes still exists. Researchers have attempted to identify different types of prototypes, such as low-vs. high-fidelity prototypes, but these attempts have centered on evaluation rather than support of design exploration. There have also been efforts to provide new ways of thinking about the activity of using prototypes, such as experience prototyping and paper prototyping, but these efforts do not provide a discourse for understanding fundamental characteristics of prototypes. In this article, we propose an anatomy of prototypes as a framework for prototype conceptualization. We view prototypes not only in their role in evaluation but also in their generative role in enabling designers to reflect on their design activities in exploring a design space. We base this framework on the findings of two case studies that reveal two key dimensions: prototypes as filters and prototypes as manifestations. We explain why these two dimensions are important and how this conceptual framework can benefit our field by establishing more solid and systematic knowledge about prototypes and prototyping.

  • 30.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Pettersson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Thinking beyond the cure: a case for human-centered design in cancer care2012In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 27-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how human-centered design can expand the solution space surrounding patient experience in healthcare, looking specifically at patient emotional wellbeing. The findings presented here are taken from our ethnographic research of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment; we investigated these individuals' emotional experiences during their time in the treatment facility. Building upon previous findings within the field of nursing concerned with the prevalence of anxiety in cancer patients and the importance of person-centered care, we implement a human-centered design research approach to investigate the situational triggers of patient anxiety within the radiotherapy treatment experience. Through 'quick ethnography', we recognize that the fixation technology used within radiotherapy is a key trigger for anxiety in patients. Application of theory from the field of science and technology studies to our analysis of this technologically-mediated anxiety suggests that the fixation device confines the patient to a passive, disempowered role within its interactions due to it being embedded with the socially scripted 'sick role'. Summarizing our insights, we find that human-centered design is capable of looking holistically at patient experience to discover new solutions spaces for mediating and preventing situational anxiety, and turning person-centered care within Radiotherapy into a pre-emptive practice instead of a responsive one.

  • 31.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington.
    Why ‘design research practice’ is not design as we know it2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå: Umeå University , 2014, p. 1039-1048Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is there a difference between design practice and design research practice? Building on recent discussions within design research about whether the design practice which occurs within design research is distinct and separate from the design practice which occurs within the design profession, this paper presents a case where constructive design practice was employed within a research project, using this example to study the nature of the design process in research. Through a thorough analysis of the designs generated, the motivations behind their development, their use as research tools, and the knowledge they generated, we identified three ways in which the design process was altered when it was imported into the research. First, the degree of development of the designs shifted from fully functional to functional enough. Second, the designs were developed in order to ask questions rather than trying to solve a problem. And finally, the failure of the design was equally able to contribute to generating knowledge as its success. We argue that these shifts in values clearly distinguish design research practice from professional design practice, but come with very real consequences that challenge the core measures we use to assess design.

  • 32.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Yttergren, Björn
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Positional acts: using a kinect sensor to reconfigure patient roles within radiotherapy treatment2014In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, 2014, p. 93-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With many medical procedures done today, patients are forced to act as passive recipients of care, while nurses and doctors are actively involved in the process of diagnosis or treatment. In this paper, we focus upon patient positioning for radiotherapy treatment, looking at the immobilization and positioning techniques used, and the role of the patient in this process. Our desire to engage patients in the positioning process led to the creation of an experimental positioning system which can enable patients to self-position themselves for treatment. Utilizing the body tracking and skeletal data capabilities of a Kinect™ sensor, our prototype provides visualizations of where an individual's body is in relation to the desired position, and when these two positions have become correctly aligned. Testing demonstrated how our prototype could be used to actively engage patients in the positioning process together with care providers, in a mutually empowering and supportive way.

  • 33.
    Nelson, Harold
    et al.
    Advanded Design Institute, Seattle, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Design Judgment -: Decision Making in the "Real" World,2003In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6965, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designis about creating the‘real’ worldaround us. Real life is complex, dynami cand uncertain. Truth is difficult enough to know, even with the best science,but ‘reality’, the domain of human experience, can be overwhelmingly paralysing and beyond comprehensio nor understanding. Careful, accurate description, concomitant with clear explanation, is necessary but not sufficient in the quest for enough understanding to allow wise decisions to be made. The value of judgement is that it allows individuals to overcome their paralysis and engage with the messy complexity of lifeina way that, when done well, can bring function, beauty, and meaning to human existence. In this paper we will examine judgement, particularly design judgement. We argue that a better understanding of judgement is needed if we want to improve our designability in an intentional manner. Judgement is a key dimension in the process of design.The ability to make design judgements is what distinguishes a designer as a designer. The ability to make good design judgements distinguishes good design.

  • 34.
    Nelson, Harold
    et al.
    Advanced Design Institute, Seattle.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Case for Design:: Creating a Culture of Intention2000In: Educational Technology, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Discusses how design projects can best be encountered through a designer approach that is inclusive of theoretical and practical knowledge as well as the capacity for pragmatic action. Highlights include design cultures and cultures of design; foundations of design; fundamental activities supported upon the foundations of design; and design education.

  • 35.
    Russo L., Nancy
    et al.
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Exploring the assumptions underlying information systems methodologies: their impact on past, present and future ISM research2000In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assumptions about an object under study can influence research in many ways. These preconceptions color the researcher’s perspective, and influence the research purpose, the research questions addressed, and the research methods used. This paper identifies and analyzes the following assumptions regarding information systems methodology (ISM) research: the positive impact of methodologies on the process and product of information system design; the irrationality of design practice; the existence of knowledge about good design practice; the ability to communicate design knowledge to practicing designers; and the ability to change the rationality of design practitioners. The impact of these assumptions on ISM research is examined for the purpose of highlighting limitations of past research and identifying more promising directions for the future.

  • 36.
    Russo, Nancy L.
    et al.
    Northern Illinois University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Exploring the assumptions underlying information systems methodologies2000In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assumptions about an object under study can influence research in many ways. These preconceptions color the researcher?s perspective, and influence the research purpose, the research questions addressed, and the research methods used. This paper identifies and analyzes the following assumptions regarding information systems methodology (ISM) research: the positive impact of methodologies on the process and product of information system design; the irrationality of design practice; the existence of knowledge about good design practice; the ability to communicate design knowledge to practicing designers; and the ability to change the rationality of design practitioners. The impact of these assumptions on ISM research is examined for the purpose of highlighting limitations of past research and identifying more promising directions for the future.

  • 37.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Design och metod.1989Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Designtänkande2007In: Under ytan - en antologi om designforskning, SVID, Rasters Förlag , 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Guidelines or aesthetics: design learning strategies1994In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 448-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents, as a theoretical vehicle, a simple dichotomy based on the concepts of the guideline approach and the aesthethics approach to design education. The dichotomy is used to deepen the understanding of design work and as a way of relating the question of design learning strategy to the historical controversy between the ideals of the Romantic and the Enlightenment traditions. The paper argues that the education of designers can be interpreted and understood to be based on some presuppositions about the nature of design work. It is concluded that design education should have as its first goal, to help design students to develop an intellectual capacity and to support them with necessary theoretical tool to be able to reveal hidden preconceptions and assumptions about design practice.

  • 40.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    In Search of a Critical Stance2008In: (Re)searching the Digital Bauhaus, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Information systems research and social responsibility1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    System design methods as creativity "killers"1989Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Technical Defense Techniques2008In: Crimeware: Understanding New Attacks and Defenses, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The design of information systems: parti, formats and sketching1999In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 3-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article it is argued that an information system must be treated as an artefact with a format. We need to see information systems design as based on architectonic and not tectonic thinking. Design based on architectonic thinking emphasizes (1) the task of giving form to a design proposal, and (2) the task of creating an overall structure for the information system. These two activities are closely related because they both deal with the issue of seeing the idea or whole of systems, and the problem of how to give form to that whole. The paper begins with an exploration of the concept formative faculties in relation to ‘given’ and ‘non-given’ objects. The concepts of parti and format are then presented as a way to grasp the ‘whole’ of an information system. How formats can be used in information systems design is discussed as well as how this leads to the act of sketching as an important but neglected activity in information systems design. Sketching is promoted by introducing diathenic graphologue as the art of ‘giving form to the unknown’. The paper ends by suggesting how formats and diathenic graphologue can be practised and included as important aspects of information systems design education and training.

  • 45.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    The nature of design practice and implications for interaction design research2008In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is interaction design research aimed at supporting interaction design practice. The main argument is that this kind of interaction design research has not (always) been successful, and that the reason for this is that it has not been guided by a sufficient understanding of the nature of design practice. Based on a comparison between the notion of complexity in science and in design, it is argued that science is not the best place to look for approaches and methods on how to approach design complexity. Instead, the case is made that any attempt by interaction design research to produce outcomes aimed at supporting design practice must be grounded in a fundamental understanding of the nature of design practice. Such an understanding can be developed into a well-grounded and rich set of rigorous and disciplined design methods and techniques, appropriate to the needs and desires of practicing designers.

  • 46.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Utskrifter av 20 intervjuer med systemutvecklare – Delredovisning av projektet "Konstruktiv Systemutveckling".1991Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    BLevis, Eli
    Indiana University, USA.
    The Confluence of Interaction Design & Design: from Disciplinary to Transdisciplinary Perspectives2008In: DRS Conference, July, Sheffield, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Chang, Yenning
    Indiana University, USA.
    Lim, Youn
    Indiana University, USA.
    Personas: From Theory to Practices2008In: NordiCHI, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Critical HCI Research: a research position proposal2008In: Design Philosophy Papers, ISSN 1448-7136, E-ISSN 1448-7136, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing development of digital technology creates new, immensely complex environments that deeply influence our lifeworld. This paper is about the ways in which HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) research and other information technology disciplines can contribute to a deeper understanding of technology and the ongoing transformations or our lifeworld. As such, the paper is a conceptual exploration driven by a sincere striving for the possibility of making a real difference to the way research is carried out on the societal influences of digital technology. The paper is based on the assumption that htere are some foundational decisions forming any research endeavor: the question of methodology, the question of object of study and most importantly—the question of being in service. We explore and propose a research position by taking a critical stance against unreflective acceptance of digital technology and by acknowledging people's lifeworld as a core focus of inquiry. Te position is also framed around an empirical and theoretical understanding of the evolving technology that we label the digital transformation, in which an appreciation of aesthetic experience is regarded to be a focal methodological concept.

  • 50.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Information Technology and the Good Life2004In: Information Systems Research Relevant Theory and Informed Practice: 20th Years Retrospective: Relevant Theory and Informed Practice - Looking Forward from a 20-year Perspective on IS Research / [ed] Bonnie Kaplan, Duane P. Truex III, A. Trevor Wood-Harper and Janice I. DeGross, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2004, p. 687-692Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf