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  • 1.
    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 84 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1430 Ås, Norway.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    NorWood: a gene expression resource for evo-devo studies of conifer wood development2017In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 216, no 2, p. 482-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The secondary xylem of conifers is composed mainly of tracheids that differ anatomically and chemically from angiosperm xylem cells. There is currently no high-spatial-resolution data available profiling gene expression during wood formation for any coniferous species, which limits insight into tracheid development.

    RNA-sequencing data from replicated, high-spatial-resolution section series throughout the cambial and woody tissues of Picea abies were used to generate the NorWood.conGenIE.org web resource, which facilitates exploration of the associated gene expression profiles and co-expression networks.

    Integration within PlantGenIE.org enabled a comparative regulomics analysis, revealing divergent co-expression networks between P. abies and the two angiosperm species Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus tremula for the secondary cell wall (SCW) master regulator NAC Class IIB transcription factors. The SCW cellulose synthase genes (CesAs) were located in the neighbourhoods of the NAC factors in Athaliana and P. tremula, but not in Pabies. The NorWood co-expression network enabled identification of potential SCW CesA regulators in P. abies.

    The NorWood web resource represents a powerful community tool for generating evo-devo insights into the divergence of wood formation between angiosperms and gymnosperms and for advancing understanding of the regulation of wood development in P. abies.

  • 2.
    Liu, Lijun
    et al.
    Davis, CA, USA.
    Ramsay, Trevor
    Davis, CA, USA.
    Zinkgraf, Matthew
    Davis, CA, USA.
    Sundell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Filkov, Vladimir
    Davis, CA, USA.
    Groover, Andrew
    Davis, CA, USA.
    A resource for characterizing genome-wide binding and putative target genes of transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation in Populus2015In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 82, no 5, p. 887-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying transcription factor target genes is essential for modeling the transcriptional networks underlying developmental processes. Here we report a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) resource consisting of genome-wide binding regions and associated putative target genes for four Populus homeodomain transcription factors expressed during secondary growth and wood formation. Software code (programs and scripts) for processing the Populus ChIP-seq data are provided within a publically available iPlant image, including tools for ChIP-seq data quality control and evaluation adapted from the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. Basic information for each transcription factor (including members of Class I KNOX, Class III HD ZIP, BEL1-like families) binding are summarized, including the number and location of binding regions, distribution of binding regions relative to gene features, associated putative target genes, and enriched functional categories of putative target genes. These ChIP-seq data have been integrated within the Populus Genome Integrative Explorer (PopGenIE) where they can be analyzed using a variety of web-based tools. We present an example analysis that shows preferential binding of transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 to the nearest neighbor genes in a pre-calculated co-expression network module, and enrichment for meristem-related genes within this module including multiple orthologs of Arabidopsis KNOTTED-like Arabidopsis 2/6.

  • 3.
    Netotea, Sergiu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sundell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    ComPlEx: conservation and divergence of co-expression networks in A. thaliana, Populus and O. sativa2014In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 15, p. 106-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Divergence in gene regulation has emerged as a key mechanism underlying species differentiation. Comparative analysis of co-expression networks across species can reveal conservation and divergence in the regulation of genes. Results: We inferred co-expression networks of A. thaliana, Populus spp. and O. sativa using state-of-the-art methods based on mutual information and context likelihood of relatedness, and conducted a comprehensive comparison of these networks across a range of co-expression thresholds. In addition to quantifying gene-gene link and network neighbourhood conservation, we also applied recent advancements in network analysis to do cross-species comparisons of network properties such as scale free characteristics and gene centrality as well as network motifs. We found that in all species the networks emerged as scale free only above a certain co-expression threshold, and that the high-centrality genes upholding this organization tended to be conserved. Network motifs, in particular the feed-forward loop, were found to be significantly enriched in specific functional subnetworks but where much less conserved across species than gene centrality. Although individual gene-gene co-expression had massively diverged, up to similar to 80% of the genes still had a significantly conserved network neighbourhood. For genes with multiple predicted orthologs, about half had one ortholog with conserved regulation and another ortholog with diverged or non-conserved regulation. Furthermore, the most sequence similar ortholog was not the one with the most conserved gene regulation in over half of the cases. Conclusions: We have provided a comprehensive analysis of gene regulation evolution in plants and built a web tool for Comparative analysis of Plant co-Expression networks (ComPlEx, http:// complex. plantgenie. org/). The tool can be particularly useful for identifying the ortholog with the most conserved regulation among several sequence-similar alternatives and can thus be of practical importance in e. g. finding candidate genes for perturbation experiments.

  • 4.
    Sundell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Novel resources enabling comparative regulomics in forest tree species2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic plants are the most abundant source of terrestrial biomass and are one of the potential sources of renewable energy that can replace the use of fossil fuels. For a country such as Sweden, where the forest industry accounts for 10% of the total export, there would be large economical benefits associated with increased biomass yield. The availability of research on wood development conducted in conifer tree species, which represent the majority of the forestry in Sweden, is limited and the majority of research has been conducted in model angiosperm species such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the large evolutionary distance between angiosperms and gymnosperms limits the possibility to identify orthologous genes and regulatory pathways by comparing sequence similarity alone. At such large evolutionary distances, the identification of gene similarity is, in most cases, not sufficient and additional information is required for functional annotation. In this thesis, two high-spatial resolution datasets profiling wood development were processed; one from the angiosperm tree Populus tremula and the other from the conifer species Picea abies. These datasets were each published together with a web resource including tools for the exploration of gene expression, co-expression and functional enrichment of gene sets. One developed resource allows interactive, comparative co-expression analysis between species to identify conserved and diverged co-expression modules. These tools make it possible to identifying conserved regulatory modules that can focus downstream research and provide biologists with a resource to identify regulatory genes for targeted trait improvement.

  • 5.
    Sundell, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Netotea, Sergiu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry,Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegi an University of Life Sciences, 1432As, Norw.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The Plant Genome Integrative Explorer Resource: PlantGenIE.org2015In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 208, no 4, p. 1149-1156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessing and exploring large-scale genomics data sets remains a significant challenge to researchers without specialist bioinformatics training. We present the integrated PlantGenIE.org platform for exploration of Populus, conifer and Arabidopsis genomics data, which includes expression networks and associated visualization tools. Standard features of a model organism database are provided, including genome browsers, gene list annotation, BLAST homology searches and gene information pages. Community annotation updating is supported via integration of WebApollo. We have produced an RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) expression atlas for Populus tremula and have integrated these data within the expression tools. An updated version of the COMPLEX resource for performing comparative plant expression analyses of gene coexpression network conservation between species has also been integrated. The PlantGenIE.org platform provides intuitive access to large-scale and genome-wide genomics data from model forest tree species, facilitating both community contributions to annotation improvement and tools supporting use of the included data resources to inform biological insight.

  • 6.
    Sundell, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Kumar, Manoj
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Johnsson, Christoffer
    Kumar, Vikash
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fischer, Urs
    Niittyla, Totte
    Sundberg, Bjorn
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1433 Ås, Norway.
    AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula2017In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1585-1604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network.

  • 7.
    Sundell, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Street, Nathaniel R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Kumar, Manoj
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Johnsson, Christoffer
    Kumar, Vikash
    Mannapperuma, Chanaka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Nilsson, Ove
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fischer, Urs
    Niittyla, Totte
    Sundberg, Bjoern
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    High-spatial-resolution transcriptome profiling reveals uncharacterized regulatory complexity underlying cambial growth and wood formation in Populus tremula2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, however, efforts to engineer new, elite varieties are constrained by the lack of a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated RNA Sequencing transcriptome data for four mature, wild-growing aspens (Populus tremula) from high-spatial-resolution tangential cryosection series spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, expanding and secondary cell wall forming xylem cells, cell death zone and the previous years annual ring. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, previously annotated protein-coding genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes and 567 long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole genome duplication had diverged expression, with the notable exception of those with high expression during secondary cell wall deposition. We performed co-expression network analysis to identify central transcriptional modules and associated several of these with known biological processes. This revealed previously uncharacterized complexity underlying the regulation of cambial growth and wood formation, with modules forming a continuum of activated processes across the tissues. The high spatial resolution suggested novel roles for known genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and components of lignification. The associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) integrates the data within a set of interactive tools for exploring the co-expression network of cambial growth and wood formation.

  • 8. Tiukova, Ievgeniia A.
    et al.
    Pita, Will de Barros
    Sundell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Momeni, Majid Haddad
    Horn, Svein Jarle
    Stahlberg, Jerry
    de Morais, Marcos Antonio, Jr.
    Passoth, Volkmar
    Adaptation of Dekkera bruxellensis to lignocellulose-based substrate2014In: Biotechnology and applied biochemistry, ISSN 0885-4513, E-ISSN 1470-8744, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation of Dekkera bruxellensis to lignocellulose hydrolysate was investigated. Cells of D. bruxellensis were grown for 72 and 192H in batch and continuous culture, respectively (adapted cells). Cultivations in semisynthetic medium were run as controls (nonadapted cells). To test the adaptation, cells from these cultures were reinoculated in the lignocellulose medium, and growth and ethanol production characteristics were monitored. Cells adapted to lignocellulose hydrolysate had a shorter lag phase, grew faster, and produced a higher ethanol concentration as compared with nonadapted cells. A stability test showed that after cultivation in rich medium, cells partially lost the adapted phenotype but still showed faster growth and higher ethanol production as compared with nonadapted cells. Because alcohol dehydrogenase genes have been described to be involved in the adaptation to furfural in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an analogous mechanism of adaptation to lignocelluloses hydrolysate of D. bruxellensis was hypothesized. However, gene expression analysis showed that genes homologous to S. cerevisiae ADH1 were not involved in the adaptation to lignocelluloses hydrolysate in D. bruxellensis.

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