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  • 1.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT .
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT .
    Hummels, Caroline
    Department of Industrial Design at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Diffract Me!: using a Skills-Based Approach in Design Practice2014In: KEER2014: Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research / [ed] Simon Schütte, Pierre Levy, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014, p. 313-328Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of skills in design is intriguing; as skills open up new perceptions of the world they allow meaning to arise as we engage with the world. Several skills-based techniques that leverage this potential have been developed, and integrated into the Designing in Skills framework. The framework builds on personal engagement of designers in their practice, and promotes them to take a first-person perspective, enabling designs to be enriched with meaning. In this paper, we present the most recent workshop based on this approach, which specifically focuses on employing the Designing in Skills framework as a starting point and catalyst for design practice. We briefly introduce the Designing in Skills framework and present the DiffractMe! project in which we built on this approach to explore its potential for design practice. We conclude with reflections on the process and result by the involved designers. These reflections offer insights into the value of this approach for enriching interactive design with experiential qualities. 

  • 2.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement2015In: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, 2015, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These designs cover a wide range of contexts, scales and use. Together, they describe and open up a design space: each of the projects provides rich, aesthetic experiences that respect complexity and ambiguity. They entice people to engage with body and mind, where meaning arises in dialogue with the artifact. We present and critically reflect on these projects in the form of an annotated portfolio. Comparing and contrasting the project results reveals insights into our overall approach and research interest regarding how to design for engagement. We conclude with opportunities that these reflections offer for the design of engaging interactions. Furthermore, we expand on the implications that these reflections suggest towards further trajectories of practice-based research into such experiences.

  • 3.
    True, Nicholas
    et al.
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Papworth, Nigel
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Zarin, Ru
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Nilbrink, Fredrik
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Lindbergh, Kent
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Lind, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Installation2013In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013, p. 3003-3006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Voice Harvester is an exploratory interactive installation that embodies human voice in physical materials. Sound input is processed, amplified and transmitted through audio drivers connected to a thin, flexible membrane that agitates the material on it. The title “Voice Harvester” is derived from the original design brief, which called for an object able to elicit non-linguistic, expressive, and naturalistic human vocal sounds to explore the full range of capability of the human voice through use of a novel, playful, and embodied interaction. This paper describes the intention, design process, construction, technical details, interaction, and planned/potential uses of this design exploration.

  • 4.
    True, Nicholas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Confabulation in the Time of Transdisciplinarity: Reflection on HCI Education and a Call for Conversation2013In: Proceeding HCI'13 Proceedings of the 15th international conference on Human-Computer Interaction: human-centred design approaches, methods, tools, and environments: Volume Part I, Springer, 2013, p. 128-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As HCI becomes ever-increasingly more transdisciplinary it encounters increasingly complex problems practical, methodological, and pedagogical in natures. This paper is an introductory exploration of the influence HCI education has in bridging academia and industry as students become practitioners. We examined how design pedagogy materializes and takes shape in both work and student process/attitudes as they become professionals, suggesting there is an area of importance to the community that is overlooked. Education shapes designers, designers shape the world, which prompts the need for a dialogue on how education pedagogy shapes practitioners that embody methods, values, skills, goals, and practices. As practitioners embody their knowledge into designs there arises a discussion that ought to be had.

  • 5. van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    Hakkarainen, Viola
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. RISE Interactive Umeå, Sweden.
    Understanding Transformations through Design: Can Resilience Thinking Help?2018In: Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (Tei'18) / [ed] Ylva Fernaeus, Donald McMillan, Martin Jonsson, Audrey Girouard, Jakob Tholander, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 694-702Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction design community increasingly addresses how digital technologies may contribute to societal transformations. This paper aims at understanding transformation ignited by a particular constructive design research project. This transformation will be discussed and analysed using resilience thinking, an established approach within sustainability science. By creating a common language between these two disciplines, we start to identify what kind of transformation took place, what factors played a role in the transformation, and which transformative qualities played a role in creating these factors. Our intention is to set out how the notion of resilience might provide a new perspective to understand how constructive design research may produce results that have a sustainable social impact. The findings point towards ways in which these two different perspectives on transformation - the analytical perspective of resilience thinking and the generative perspective of constructive design research may become complementary in both igniting and understanding transformations.

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