umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alenius, Gerd Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Psoriatic arthritis-new insights give new options for treatment.2007In: Current medicinal chemistry, ISSN 0929-8673, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 359-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alenius, Gerd Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Berglin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) in psoriatic patients with or without joint inflammation.2006In: Ann Rheum Dis, ISSN 0003-4967, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 398-400Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Eriksson, C
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Interleukin-6 and soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha-markers of inflammation in patients with psoriatic arthritis?2009In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 120-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a possible systemic effect of joint inflammation in contrast to skin disease only, by measuring IL-6 and IL-2sRalpha. METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients (111 male / 108 female, age 50.4+/-14.5 yrs (mean+/-SD)) with psoriasis were clinically and laboratory examined. 134 patients had inflammatory joint manifestations defined as peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease, of whom 37 had measurable inflammation, defined as ESR >25 mm/h and/or CRP >15 mg/L. RESULTS: Interleukin-6 was significantly higher in patients with joint disease and measurable inflammation ((median, Q1-Q3) 4.07, 0.92-14.60), and in patients without measured inflammation (1.22, 0.70-3.46), compared to patients with skin disease only (0.70, 0.70-1.73, p<0.001 and p=0.002 respectively). The difference between the two groups of patients with inflammatory joint manifestations was significant (p=0.001). The levels of IL-6 correlated with the actual number of joints affected with arthritis (p<0.001; rs=0.248), ESR (p<0.001; rs=0.459), CRP (p<0.001; rs=0.314) and IL-2sRalpha (p=0.002; rs=0.210). The levels of IL-2sRalpha. did not differ between the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: In this study, IL-6 was significantly higher in patients with psoriasis and inflammatory joint disease with or without routine measurable inflammatory activity compared with patients having psoriasis of the skin. We found that patients with psoriasis and joint inflammation may have systemic effects that could be captured by serum measurements of IL-6. Soluble IL-2Ralpha was not a marker of inflammation in this study.

  • 4.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Husmark, Tomas
    Theander, Elke
    Larsson, Per
    Geijer, Mats
    Teleman, Annika
    Lindqvist, Ulla R. C.
    Rheumatoid Arthritis, a More Severe Disease Than Psoriatic Arthritis?: A Comparison Of Disease Activity In Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis From The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Registry (SwePsA) and The Swedish Rheumatology Registry For Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (SRR)2013In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 65, no Special issue, Supplement 10, p. S150-S150, Meeting Abstract: 346Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jidell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nordmark, L
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Disease manifestations and HLA antigens in psoriatic arthritis in northern Sweden2002In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify potential markers of aggressive joint manifestations and HLA associations in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in northern Sweden. Patients with PsA were examined clinically, with laboratory tests and radiologically. The classification of the disease was based on peripheral and/or axial engagement. HLA B17, B37 and B62 were significantly increased in PsA patients. Univariate analyses suggest that the HLA antigens B37, B62 and some clinical variables were associated with disease course. However, in multivariate analyses distal interphalangeal joint affliction and polyarticular manifestations were the only variables remaining significantly associated with irreversible joint destruction or deformity. There were no significant effects of HLA antigens. In this cross-sectional study, clinical manifestations were more reliable predictors of aggressive joint damage than were specific HLA antigens. However, HLA antigens seemed to modify the expression of the joint disease rather than being involved in joint disease susceptibility.

  • 6. Apel, Maria
    et al.
    Uebe, Steffen
    Bowes, John
    Giardina, Emiliano
    Korendowych, Eleanor
    Juneblad, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Pasutto, Francesca
    Ekici, Arif B.
    McManus, Ross
    Ho, Pauline
    Bruce, Ian N.
    Ryan, Anthony W.
    Behrens, Frank
    Boehm, Beate
    Traupe, Heiko
    Lohmann, Joerg
    Gieger, Christian
    Wichmann, Heinz-Erich
    Padyukov, Leonid
    FitzGerald, Oliver
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    McHugh, Neil J.
    Novelli, Giuseppe
    Burkhardt, Harald
    Barton, Anne
    Reis, Andre
    Hueffmeier, Ulrike
    Variants in RUNX3 Contribute to Susceptibility to Psoriatic Arthritis, Exhibiting Further Common Ground With Ankylosing Spondylitis2013In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 1224-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common inflammatory joint disease distinct from other chronic arthritides and frequently accompanied by psoriasis vulgaris. In a first genome-wide association study (GWAS), we were able to identify several genetic risk factors. However, even combined with previously identified factors, the genetic contribution to disease was not fully explained. Therefore, we undertook this study to investigate further 17 loci from our GWAS that did not reach genome-wide significance levels of association in the initial analysis. Methods Twenty-one of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were successfully genotyped in independent cohorts of 1,398 PsA patients and 6,389 controls and in a group of 964 German patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Results Association with a RUNX3 variant, rs4649038, was replicated in independent patients and controls and resulted in a combined P value of 1.40 x 108 by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test and an odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.151.33). Further analyses based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) at RUNX3 refined the most significant association to an LD block located in the first intron of one isoform. Weaker evidence for association was detected in German patients with psoriasis vulgaris (P = 5.89 x 102; OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.001.28]), indicating a role in the skin manifestations of psoriasis. Conclusion Our analyses identified variants in RUNX3 as susceptibility factors for PsA. RUNX3 has already been implicated in susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis, another spondyloarthritis, although its risk allele is independent from the one for PsA. RUNX-3 is involved in CD8+ T lymphocyte differentiation and is therefore a good candidate for involvement in PsA and psoriasis vulgaris as T cellmediated diseases.

  • 7. Bowes, John
    et al.
    Loehr, Sabine
    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley
    Uebe, Steffen
    Bruce, Ian N.
    Feletar, Marie
    Marzo-Ortega, Helena
    Helliwell, Philip
    Ryan, Anthony W.
    Kane, David
    Korendowych, Eleanor
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Giardina, Emiliano
    Packham, Jonathan
    McManus, Ross
    FitzGerald, Oliver
    Brown, Matthew A.
    Behrens, Frank
    Burkhardt, Harald
    McHugh, Neil
    Huffmeier, Ulrike
    Ho, Pauline
    Reis, Andre
    Barton, Anne
    PTPN22 is associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis: evidence for a further PsA-specific risk locus2015In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, no 10, p. 1882-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis; it has a higher estimated genetic component than psoriasis alone, however most genetic susceptibility loci identified for PsA to date are also shared with psoriasis. Here we attempt to validate novel single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from our recent PsA Immunochip study and determine specificity to PsA. Methods A total of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms were selected (P-Immunochip <1x10(-4)) for validation genotyping in 1177 cases and 2155 controls using TaqMan. Meta-analysis of Immunochip and validation data sets consisted of 3139 PsA cases and 11 078 controls. Novel PsA susceptibility loci were compared with data from two large psoriasis studies (WTCCC2 and Immunochip) to determine PsA specificity. Results We found genome-wide significant association to rs2476601, mapping to PTPN22 (p=1.49x10(-9), OR=1.32), but no evidence for association in the psoriasis cohort (p=0.34) and the effect estimates were significantly different between PsA and psoriasis (p=3.2x10(-4)). Additionally, we found genome-wide significant association to the previously reported psoriasis risk loci; NOS2 (rs4795067, p=5.27x10(-9)). Conclusions For the first time, we report genome-wide significant association of PTPN22 (rs2476601) to PsA susceptibility, but no evidence for association to psoriasis.

  • 8. Geijer, Mats
    et al.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Husmark, Tomas
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Larsson, Per T.
    Teleman, Annika
    Theander, Elke
    The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Registry 5-year Followup: Substantial Radiographic Progression Mainly in Men with High Disease Activity and Development of Dactylitis2015In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 2110-2117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe early radiographic findings in patients from the Swedish psoriatic arthritis (SwePsA) registry, progression of destruction, correlations with clinical disease variables, and predictors of destruction.

    Methods: Hand and foot radiographs were available for 72 of 197 SwePsA patients followed for 5 years. Clinical data were collected according to the SwePsA protocol.

    Results: Disease characteristics and clinical improvement were similar in men and women. Radiographic abnormalities were more pronounced in men. Total Wassenberg radiographic score at baseline was 0 in 45% of men and 51% of women. One man and one woman had a score > 10. At 5 years, total score was 0 in 14% of men and 40% of women (p = 0.018); 17% of men and 7% of women had scores > 10. Mean total scores for men and women had increased. Baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate was associated with baseline total radiographic score. In men, swollen joint count was positively, and in women tender joint count negatively, correlated to total radiographic score. After 5 years, only male scores, mainly hand scores, significantly correlated with 28-joint Disease Activity Score and Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis scores, swollen joint count, and dactylitis. Achieving remission or minimal disease activity after 5 years protected against structural damage, mainly in men.

    Conclusion: Radiographic progression in early PsA was generally slow but substantial. Male sex appears to be a risk factor for early radiographic damage while the presence of baseline radiographic damage and dactylitis developing during followup seem to predict further destruction. Hand and foot radiograph scoring cannot be substituted with clinical signs.

  • 9.
    Hansson, Claes
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    S-Calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9): A Potential Marker of Inflammation in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis2014In: Clinical & Developmental Immunology, ISSN 1740-2522, E-ISSN 1740-2530, p. 696415-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse levels of S100A8/S100A9 (calprotectin) and selected cytokines, in blood, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods. Sixty-five patients with PsA were examined for clinical manifestations and laboratory measurements of S-calprotectin, ESR, hs-CRP, and selected cytokines. Thirty-two patients had mono-/oligoarthritis and 33 had polyarthritis. S-calprotectin, hs-CRP, and cytokines were measured using ELISA, immunoturbidimetry, and multiplex technology (Bio-Plex). Patients with PsA were compared with 31 healthy controls. Results. S-calprotectin and hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with PsA compared with controls (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, resp.). Patients suffering a polyarthritic disease pattern presented with significantly higher levels of S-calprotectin compared with controls and patients with mono-/oligoarthritis (P < 0.001 and P = 0.017, resp.). The levels of S-calprotectin correlated with hs-CRP (P < 0.001; r(s) = 0.441), swollen joint count (P = 0.002, r(s) = 0.397), and CXCL10 (P = 0.046, r(s) = 0.678) but not with any of the other cytokines evaluated. In multiple logistic regression analysis, S-calprotectin was the only variable significantly associated with psoriatic arthritis (P = 0.002, OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 1.002-1.010). Conclusion. S-calprotectin and hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with PsA. A polyarthritic disease pattern showed higher levels of S-calprotectin thanmono-/oligoarthritis. S-calprotectin is considered a potential marker of disease activity in patients with PsA.

  • 10. Helliwell, Philip S
    et al.
    Taylor, William J
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Treatment of psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis with disease modifying drugs: comparison of drugs and adverse reactions2008In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 472-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Although it seems likely that these conditions have a different pathogenesis, the drugs used to treat them are the same. Our study used a cross-sectional clinical database to compare drug use and side-effect profile in these 2 diseases. METHODS: The CASPAR study collected data on 588 patients with PsA and 536 controls, 70% of whom had RA. Data on disease modifying drug treatments used over the whole illness were recorded, together with their outcomes, including adverse events, for RA and PsA. RESULTS: For both diseases methotrexate (MTX) was the most frequently used disease modifying drug (39% of patients with PsA, 30% with RA), with over 70% of patients in both diseases still taking the drug. Other drugs were used with the following frequencies in PsA and RA, respectively: sulfasalazine 22%/13%, gold salts 7%/11%, antimalarial drugs 5%/14%, corticosteroids 10%/17%, and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs 6%/5%. Compared to RA, cyclosporine and anti-TNF agents were less likely to be ineffective in PsA. Compared to RA, subjects with PsA were less likely to be taking MTX and more likely to be taking anti-TNF agents. Hepatotoxicity with MTX was more common in PsA and pulmonary toxicity with MTX was found more often in RA. CONCLUSION: These data provide insight into prescribing patterns of disease modifying drugs in RA and PsA in a large international cohort, together with the differential adverse events of these drugs between these diseases.

  • 11.
    Hofstedt, Oscar E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Di Giuseppe, D.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stattin, N.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ljung, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Validation of internet-based reporting of patient reported outcomes within the swedish rheumatology quality register2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, p. 444-445Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Hüffmeier, Ulrike
    et al.
    Uebe, Steffen
    Ekici, Arif B
    Bowes, John
    Giardina, Emiliano
    Korendowych, Eleanor
    Juneblad, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Apel, Maria
    McManus, Ross
    Ho, Pauline
    Bruce, Ian N
    Ryan, Anthony W
    Behrens, Frank
    Lascorz, Jesús
    Böhm, Beate
    Traupe, Heiko
    Lohmann, Jörg
    Gieger, Christian
    Wichmann, Heinz-Erich
    Herold, Christine
    Steffens, Michael
    Klareskog, Lars
    Wienker, Thomas F
    Fitzgerald, Oliver
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    McHugh, Neil J
    Novelli, Giuseppe
    Burkhardt, Harald
    Barton, Anne
    Reis, André
    Common variants at TRAF3IP2 are associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis2010In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 996-999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease that is distinct from other chronic arthritides and which is frequently accompanied by psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) and seronegativity for rheumatoid factor. We conducted a genome-wide association study in 609 German individuals with PsA (cases) and 990 controls with replication in 6 European cohorts including a total of 5,488 individuals. We replicated PsA associations at HLA-C and IL12B and identified a new association at TRAF3IP2 (rs13190932, P = 8.56 × 10⁻¹⁷). TRAF3IP2 was also associated with PsV in a German cohort including 2,040 individuals (rs13190932, P = 1.95 × 10⁻³). Sequencing of the exons of TRAF3IP2 identified a coding variant (p.Asp10Asn, rs33980500) as the most significantly associated SNP (P = 1.13 × 10⁻²⁰, odds ratio = 1.95). Functional assays showed reduced binding of this TRAF3IP2 variant to TRAF6, suggesting altered modulation of immunoregulatory signals through altered TRAF interactions as a new and shared pathway for PsA and PsV.

  • 13.
    Isaksson, J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Screening and simple counselling affect traditional cardiovascular risk factors in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127 Meeting Abstract PP234, p. 76-76Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and increased mortality in CVD. The cause of this increase has not been completely established, but chronic inflammation is thought to play a role. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors also appear to be important and may be potentiated by this inflammation. The Swedish Society for Rheumatology (SRF) has developed a set of guidelines for screening and primary prevention of CVD in patients with RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate these guidelines in a clinical setting.

    Method: Forty-seven patients newly diagnosed with RA during 2012 at the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital of Umeå were recruited. Three months after initial diagnosis of RA, patients were examined physically and blood samples were collected with regard to traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to the guidelines from the SRF. Tests of cardiorespiratory fitness were also performed. Additionally, patients received simple counselling regarding matters of diet, tobacco use and exercise from a nurse and a physiotherapist, respectively. The counselling session, based upon national guidelines from the National Food Agency and the Public Health Agency, was performed once per patient and lasted for approximately 45 minutes. A follow-up was performed 9 months after the first examination. This intervention was integrated into the clinic’s pre-existing early RA follow-up programme. The results were adjusted for disease activity and disability.

    Results: Among the 47 included patients, 45 reached the 9-month follow-up. Two were excluded because of delayed follow-up. Mean diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly from 80 to 77 mmHg (p < 0.05). Mean S-cholesterol decreased significantly from 5.5 to 5.2 mmol/L (p < 0.05). Mean ApoA1/ApoB decreased significantly from 0.73 to 0.65 (p < 0.05). In all the remaining variables (waist circumference, BMI, systolic blood pressure, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, FP-glucose), a clear decreasing trend could be observed (p > 0.05). Aerobic capacity according to Åstrand remained unchanged (p > 0.05).

    Conclusions: Several traditional risk factors for CVD were improved at the 9-month follow-up. This suggests that this model of screening according to the SRF guidelines and simple counselling according to national guidelines might be useful in primary prevention of CVD in patients with RA.

  • 14.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mortality and cardiovascular comorbidity in psoriatic arthritis2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 796-796Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Disease activity and increased risk of cardiovascular death among patients with psoriatic arthritis2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, no Suppl. 128, p. 29-29, article id PP33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Johansson, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Association between inflammasome-related polymorphisms and psoriatic arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Johansson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Association between the PTPN22 +1858 C/T polymorphism and psoriatic arthritis2011In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 13, article id R45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the frequency of the PTPN22 +1858 C/T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs 2476601), previously shown to be associated with several autoimmune diseases, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in comparison with population based controls.

    METHODS: A total of 291 patients (145 male/146 female, mean age (± S.D.) 52.2 (± 13.1) years) with PsA were examined clinically, by standard laboratory tests and their DNA was genotyped for the SNP rs2476601 (PTPN22 +1858 C/T). Allelic frequencies were determined and compared with 725 controls.

    RESULTS: Carriage of the risk allele, PTPN22+1858T, showed a significant association with patients with PsA compared with controls (χ2 = 6.56, P = 0.010, odds ratio (OR) 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10 to 2.02). A significantly higher proportion of carriers of the risk allele (T) had significantly more deformed joints (n ± SEM) (5.9 ± 1.2 vs 2.8 ± 0.5; P = 0.005).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study the +1858T allele of the PTPN22 gene, known to be associated with several autoimmune diseases, was associated with PsA. The finding of significantly more joints with deformities among carriers of the T variant could indicate a more aggressive phenotype of disease.

  • 18.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Disease activity and increased risk of cardiovascular death among patients with psoriatic arthritis2016In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 2155-2161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Recent studies indicate increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but results are inconsistent. This prompted our investigation of the mortality rate, cause of death, and incidence of acute CV events in patients from northern Sweden with PsA.

    Methods: Patients with established PsA (464) were included. To calculate standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for CV events, data were extracted from the National Causes of Death Register and the National Inpatient Care Register in Sweden, and compared with the general population. The study period was 1995-2011. To study the effect of inflammatory activity, a composite disease activity index (DAI) was used.

    Results: The SMR (95% CI) for overall mortality and diseases of the circulatory system (International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition; I00-I99) was 1.22 (0.89-1.63) and 1.64 (1.02-2.52), respectively. In regression analysis, DAI was significantly associated with death (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.41-2.80) when adjusted for age and sex (p < 0.001), and remained significant after stratifying patients into the 2 major causes of death: diseases of the circulatory system and malignant neoplasms. Peripheral and axial disease was associated with death (OR 4.02, 95% CI 1.84-8.84, p < 0.001) compared with peripheral disease only. The SIR (95% CI) for a CV event (myocardial infarction or stroke) was 0.597 (0.40-0.86); this association was only significant in men.

    Conclusion: Patients with PsA had a small but significant increase in SMR for death due to diseases of the circulatory system compared with the general population. Among patients, death was associated with DAI, as well as axial involvement in combination with peripheral disease, indicating more aggressive disease phenotypes.

  • 19.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Expression of biomarkers in relation to disease manifestations of psoriatic arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lindquist, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University. Lipum AB, Umeå, Sweden.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    Umeå University.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University.
    Lundberg, Lennart
    Wang, Yuhang
    Umeå University.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University. Lipum AB, Umeå, Sweden.
    A novel target for treatment of inflammatory joint diseases2019In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, p. 1525-1526Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is a hitherto unrecognized player in inflammation. Animals devoid of BSSL (knockout mice) are protected from developing collagen induced arthritis (CIA) and collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA), and antibodies directed towards BSSL has been proven to prevent or mitigate arthritis in mouse and rat arthritis models1. In humans, BSSL is present in blood2 and accumulate at sites of inflammation. Patients with acute pancreatitis have significantly increased plasma BSSL levels compared to healthy controls. Whether BSSL in blood originates from pancreas, inflammatory cells, or both remains to be elucidated.

    Objectives: To determine BSSL concentration in blood samples from patients with inflammatory joint disorders and to evaluate possible relationships between circulating BSSL levels and disease-activity variables.

    Methods: BSSL concentrations in plasma or serum were determined in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis arthritis (PsA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between BSSL concentrations and disease activity score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), S100A8/9, leukocyte- and neutrophil counts, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed using Spearman rank-order correlation.

    Results: Significant correlations between BSSL concentration in plasma and disease activity score (DAS28, rS=0.31, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.58, p<0.000), CRP (rS=0.42, p=0.012), leukocytes (rS=0.66, p<0.000), and neutrophils (rS=0.71, p<0.000) were found in RA. The BSSL plasma concentration decreased with duration of treatment with the TNFα inhibitor infliximab, in parallel with decreasing DAS28 score.

    BSSL concentration was significantly higher in sera from PsA patients with both oligo- and polyarthritis compared with healthy controls. Moreover, BSSL concentration in serum correlated significantly with S100A8/A9 and CRP concentrations (rS=0.54, p<0.001 and rS=0.49, p<0.001, respectively). No correlation between levels of BSSL and cytokines or chemokines were found in RA or PsA plasma or serum, respectively.

    In JIA, levels of BSSL in serum correlated significantly with JIA disease activity score (JADAS27) (rS=0.26, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.47, p<0.000), and leukocytes (rS=0.32, p<0.000).

    Conclusion: BSSL concentration in serum and plasma correlated with disease activity in patients with inflammatory joint disorders, i.e. RA, PsA and JIA. These data in humans support the relevance of our previous studies in rodents and therefore also our hypothesis 1 that BSSL is a novel target for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  • 21. Lindqvist, U.
    et al.
    Wernroth, M. -L
    Husmark, T.
    Larsson, P.
    Geijer, M.
    Teleman, A.
    Theander, E.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    DAPSA, DAS28 and MDA predict long-term treatment regime in psoriatic arthritis: the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort2017In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe treatment patterns in the Swedish early psoriatic arthritis cohort (SwePsA) of the mono-/oligo-arthritic (M/O) and polyarthritis (P) and identify early predictive factors for treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (DMARD), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and tumour necrosis factor inhibition (TNFi) after 5 years. Methods: Data for 198 M/O and P PsA were obtained within the programme for SwePsA. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between early predictive factors and treatment after 5 years adjusted for age at inclusion. The analysis of DMARD/NSAID was adjusted for medication at inclusion. Results: After inclusion visit, DMARD was prescribed in 30% of M/O and 56% of P PsA; mainly methotrexate. TNFi was not prescribed at inclusion, but 23 patients were treated at 5-year follow-up. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for treatment with both DMARD and NSAID after 5 years was 3.65 (1.34 - 9.89) (p=0.010) for Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) >3.2 and 2.90 (1.20-6.99) (p=0.038) for Disease Activity Index in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) >14 at inclusion. TNFi treatment was, after adjusting for age, associated with high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.0043), high C-reactive protein (p=0.013), DAPSA (p<0.001), not reaching minimal disease activity (p=0.001) high health assessment questionnaire (p=0.001), patient's overall assessment on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (p=0.009), high pain VAS (p=0.007), and high number of tender and swollen joints (p=0.031) at inclusion. Conclusion: Disease activity in early M/O and P PsA is to be considered in deciding the level of health care assessment and future pharmacological treatment. DAS28 >3.2 and DAPSA>14 early in the disease predict subsequent treatment with DMARD. For prediction of biological treatment, not reaching MDA at onset of disease, would be the composite index of choice.

  • 22. Lindqvist, Ulla R C
    et al.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Husmark, Tomas
    Theander, Elke
    Holmström, Gunilla
    Larsson, Per T
    The Swedish early psoriatic arthritis register-- 2-year followup: a comparison with early rheumatoid arthritis.2008In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 668-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE :Patients with symptoms and signs compatible with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), with or without psoriasis, have been documented in the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis (SwePsA) register. Our aim was to find markers for disease progression and to evaluate treatments for PsA using these data. METHODS: Patients referred to rheumatology outpatient clinics within 2 years of onset were assessed on inclusion and at followup 2 years later. Data collection was performed according to the program for SwePsA, and classification was as described by Moll and Wright and the ClASsification Criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR). Remission was recorded if the patient had no tender or swollen joints and if erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were within the reference range. Patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) recruited from the Swedish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Register (Ramona) provided comparison data. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-five patients with PsA according to CASPAR were assessed; 44% were classified as having mono/oligoarthritis and 47% as polyarthritis. Two patients (1%) were in remission initially, and 23 (17%) at followup. Patients with polyarticular disease had the highest inflammatory activity, measured by swollen and tender joint counts, ESR, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and self-assessment by visual analog scale of pain and global disease activity. Dactylitis was associated with radiological findings. Compared with RA patients, they had significantly lower CRP, ESR, and number of swollen joints (p = 0.0003, p = 0.0026, p = 0.0380, respectively) at inclusion, but equal numbers of tender joints and self-assessment of pain and disease activity. CONCLUSION: About half the patients had polyarthritis and the other half had mono/oligoarthritis at followup after 2 years. Patients with polyarthritis had the highest inflammatory activity. Apart from ESR, CRP, and swollen joint count, there were no significant differences in activity between RA and polyarticular PsA.

  • 23. Lindqvist, Ulla
    et al.
    Theander, Elke
    Husmark, Tomas
    Larsson, Per
    Teleman, Annika
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Geijer, Mats
    The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis (SWEPSA) registry 5-year follow-up: Slow radiographic progression with highest scores in male feet and patients with baseline x-ray abnormalities2015In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 135, no Suppl. 3, p. S1-S1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to describe early X-ray findings in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from the SwePsA registry using the Wassenberg score, evaluate progression of structural damage, analyze correlations to clinical disease parameters and identify predictors of progressive radiographic joint disease.

  • 24.
    Madsen, Rasmus Kirkegaard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lundstedt, Torbjörn
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jon
    AcureOmics, Tvistevägen 48, SE-90736 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sennbro, Carl-Johan
    Active Biotech Research, Scheelevägen 22, SE-22007 Lund, Sweden.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå Plant Science Center, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-90183 Umeå, Sweden.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Diagnostic properties of metabolic perturbations in rheumatoid arthritis2011In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 13, no 1, p. R19-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of diagnosing early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by measuring selected metabolic biomarkers. METHODS: We compared the metabolic profile of patients with RA with those of healthy controls and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsoA). The metabolites were measured using two different chromatography-mass spectrometry platforms, thereby giving a broad overview of serum metabolites. The metabolic profiles of patient and control groups were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. The findings were validated in a follow-up study of RA patients and healthy volunteers. RESULTS: RA patients were diagnosed with a sensitivity of 93 % and a specificity of 70 % in a validation study using detection of 52 metabolites. Patients with RA or PsoA could be distinguished with a sensitivity of 90 % and a specificity of 94 %. Glyceric acid, D-ribofuranoise and hypoxanthine were increased in RA patients, whereas histidine, threonic acid, methionine, cholesterol, asparagine and threonine were all decreased when compared with healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolite profiling (metabolomics) is a potentially useful technique for diagnosing RA. The predictive value was irrespective of the presence of antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (ACPA).

  • 25.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Ahlénius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Low bone mass density at multiple skeletal sites, including the appendicular skeleton in amenorrheic runners1999In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate any difference in bone mass at different sites between female long-distance runners with amenorrhea and those with eumenorrhea. We compared 10 amenorrheic and 10 eumenorrheic athletes to determine whether athletes with amenorrhea have lower BMD in multiple skeletal regions, including weight-bearing lower limbs. The amenorrheic group had experienced menstrual dysfunction ranging from 3 to 43 months. As a further control group, 16 eumenorrheic soccer players were compared with the former two running groups regarding their BMD measurements. The two groups were matched for age, height, and amount of training. Areal bone mineral density (BMD) was measured and was found to be significantly lower in the total body, humerus, spine, lumbar spine, pelvis, femoral neck, trochanter, total femur, femur diaphysis, tibia diaphysis and in the nonweight-bearing head of the femur in the amenorrheic group. Body weight, BMI, fat mass, and body fat percent were significantly lower in the amenorrheic group. The differences in the BMD of the head, humerus, femoral neck, total femur, femur diaphysis, and tibia diaphysis disappeared when adjusted for body weight. Compared with the soccer group, the amenorrheic subjects had significantly lower BMD values at all sites except for the head, Ward's triangle, and femur diaphysis. Blood samples were obtained in the two running groups for analysis of osteocalcin, carboxy terminal telopeptide (ICTP), procollagen I (PICP), and estradiol. There were no significant differences between the groups but there was a strong tendency towards a lower estradiol level and a higher osteocalcin level in the amenorrheic group. A free estradiol index (FE2) was derived as the ratio of estradiol to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and was significantly lower in the amenorrheic group. No difference in their daily intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrates, fiber, calcium, and vitamin D was observed. However, both groups showed a surprisingly low energy intake in relation to their training regimens. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that weight was the best predictor of spine BMD in both groups. Estradiol and FE2 were significant predictors of the BMD of the proximal femur in the eumenorrheic group, but did not predict any BMD site in the amenorrheic group. In conclusion, amenorrhea in athletic women affects trabecular and cortical bone in both axial and appendicular skeleton. However, some of the discrepancy can be explained by a lower body weight. Physical weight-bearing activity does not seem to completely compensate for the side effects of reduced estrogen levels even in weight-bearing bones in the lower extremity and spine.

  • 26.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Kan hård träning och lågt energi-intag framkalla och driva anorektiskt beteende?1992In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 89, no 50, p. 4356-4358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Theander, Elke
    et al.
    Husmark, Tomas
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Larsson, Per T
    Teleman, Annika
    Geijer, Mats
    Lindqvist, Ulla RC
    Early psoriatic arthritis: short symptom duration, male gender and preserved physical functioning at presentation predict favourable outcome at 5-year follow-up. Results from the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Register (SwePsA)2014In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 407-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Register describes the course of early psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a real life clinical setting in Sweden. The aim of this study was to obtain information on predictors of clinical outcomes over a 5-year period with special focus on effects of gender, joint patterns, diagnostic delay and initial disease activity.

    Methods In six centres, patients with signs suggestive of PsA were included in the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Register within 2 years of symptom onset. CASPAR (classification for psoriatic arthritis) criteria were fulfilled by 197 patients who had passed the 5-year follow-up. Disease activity was measured by the Disease Activity Score including 28 joints (DAS28) and the Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). Remission and minimal disease activity (MDA) were used as outcome measures.

    Results Mean age at inclusion was 46 years, younger in male than female patients (43 vs 48 years). Mean DAS28 was 3.7 and 3.0 at inclusion and 2.8 and 2.1 at follow-up for women and men, respectively-significantly higher in women at both visits. Likewise, DAPSA scores were significantly higher in women. The degree of improvement (change in DAS28 and DAPSA) was similar. Men achieved MDA or remission (50% vs 33%, 25% vs 13%, respectively) more often, and women had significantly more polyarthritis at inclusion (49% vs 27%) and after 5 years (25% vs 15%). Axial or mono/oligoarticular disease was predominant in men. Independent predictors of MDA at the 5-year follow-up were: shorter symptom duration; greater general wellbeing (global visual analogue scale); and low Health Assessment Questionnaire at inclusion.

    Conclusions In early PsA, short delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis, preserved function, and male gender are the most important predictors of favourable clinical outcome at the 5-year follow-up. Early recognition of PsA and active treatment may be important, particularly in women with polyarticular disease.

  • 28. Theander, Elke
    et al.
    Husmark, Tomas
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Larsson, Per
    Teleman, Annika
    Geijer, Mats
    Lindqvist, Ulla R. C.
    The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis (SwePsA) Registry. 5-Year Follow-up: Higher Disease Activity, Greater Functional Impairment and Worse Outcome for Women Compared to Men2011In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 63, no 10, p. S193-S193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Tornqvist, Lars
    et al.
    Husmark, Tomas
    Lindqvist, Ulla R. C.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Larsson, Per
    Teleman, Annika
    Geijer, Mats
    Kristensen, Lars Erik
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Theander, Elke
    Health-Related Quality Of Life In Early Psoriatic Arthritis In Comparison With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis. A 5-Year Follow-Up Report From The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Registry and The Swedish Early Intervention In RA Registry2013In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 65, no Special issue, Supplement 10, p. S142-S142, Meeting Abstract: 329Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf