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  • 1.
    Barzegar, Hamid R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Ramstedt, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk W.
    Malolepszy, Artur
    Stobinski, Leszek
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Simple Dip-Coating Process for the Synthesis of Small Diameter Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Effect of Catalyst Composition and Catalyst Particle Size on Chirality and Diameter2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 22, p. 12232-12239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a dip-coating method to prepare catalyst particles (mixture of iron and cobalt) with a controlled diameter distribution on silicon wafer substrates by changing the solution's concentration and withdrawal velocity. The size and distribution of the prepared catalyst particles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Carbon nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on the substrates with the prepared catalyst particles. By decreasing the catalyst particle size to below 10 nm, the growth of carbon nanotubes can be tuned from few-walled carbon nanotubes, with homogeneous diameter, to highly pure single-walled carbon nanotubes. Analysis of the Raman radial breathing modes, using three different Raman excitation wavelengths (488, 633, and 785 nm), showed a relatively broad diameter distribution (0.8-1.4 nm) of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different chiralities. However, by changing the composition of the catalyst particles while maintaining the growth parameters, the chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes were reduced to mainly four different types, (12, 1), (12, 0), (8, 5), and (7, 5), accounting for about 70% of all nanotubes.

  • 2.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Gracia Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    C60/Collapsed Carbon Nanotube Hybrids: A Variant of Peapods2015In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 829-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine a variant of so-called carbon nanotube peapods by packing C60 molecules inside the open edge ducts of collapsed carbon nanotubes. C60 insertion is accomplished through a facile single-step solution-based process. Theoretical modeling is used to evaluate favorable low-energy structural configurations. Overfilling of the collapsed tubes allows infiltration of C60 over the full cross-section of the tubes and consequent partial or complete reinflation, yielding few-wall, large diameter cylindrical nanotubes packed with crystalline C60 solid cores.

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  • 3.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitrogen Doping Mechanism in Small Diameter Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact on Electronic Properties and Growth Selectivity2013In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 117, no 48, p. 25805-25816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen doping in carbon nanostructures has attracted interest for more than a decade, and recent implementation of such structures in energy conversion systems has boosted the interest even more. Despite numerous studies, the structural conformation and stability of nitrogen functionalities in small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and the impact of these functionalities on the electronic and mechanical properties of the SWNTs, are incomplete. Here we report a detailed study on nitrogen doping in SWNTs with diameters in the range of 0.8?1.0 nm, with well-defined chirality. We show that the introduction of nitrogen in the carbon framework significantly alters the stability of certain tubes, opening for the possibility to selectively grow nitrogen-doped SWNTs with certain chirality and diameter. At low nitrogen concentration, pyridinic functionalities are readily incorporated and the tubular structure is well pertained. At higher concentrations, pyrrolic functionalities are formed, which leads to significant structural deformation of the nanotubes and hence a stop in growth of crystalline SWNTs. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool to understand guest atom doping and electronic charge transfer in SWNTs. By correlating the influence of defined nitrogen functionalities on the electronic properties of SWNTs with different chirality, we make precise interpretation of experimental Raman data. We show that the previous interpretation of the double-resonance G?-peak in many aspects is wrong and instead can be well-correlated to the type of nitrogen doping of SWNTs originating from the p- or n-doping nature of the nitrogen incorporation. Our results are supported by experimental and theoretical data.

  • 4.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Larsen, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Jia, Xueen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Palladium nanocrystals supported on photo-transformed C-60 nanorods: effect of crystal morphology and electron mobility on the electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation2014In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 73, p. 34-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the synthesis and decoration of high-aspect-ratio crystalline C-60 nanorods (NRs) by functionalized palladium nanoparticles with an average size of 4.78 +/- 0.66 nm. In their pristine form, C-60 NRs suffer from partial damage in the solution-based decoration process resulting in poor crystallinity. However, by modifying the NR surface via in situ photochemical transformation in the liquid state, we are able to prepare highly stable NRs that retain their crystalline structure during the decoration process. Our method thus opens up for the synthesis of highly crystalline nanocomposite hybrids comprising Pd nanoparticles and C-60 NRs. Bys measuring the electron mobility of different C-60 NRs, we relate both the effect of electron mobility and crystallinity to the final electrocatalytic performance of the synthesized hybrid structures. We show that the photo-transformed C-60 NRs exhibit highly advantageous properties for ethanol oxidation based on both a better crystallinity and a higher bulk conductivity. These findings give important information in the search for efficient catalyst support.

  • 5.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States ‡ Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden § Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States ∥ Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.
    Larsen, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Boulanger, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Zettl, Alex
    Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Self-assembled PCBM nanosheets: a facile route to electronic layer-on-Layer heterostructures2018In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 1442-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the self-assembly of semicrystalline [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) nanosheets at the interface between a hydrophobic solvent and water, and utilize this opportunity for the realization of electronically active organic/organic molecular heterostructures. The self-assembled PCBM nanosheets can feature a lateral size of >1 cm2 and be transferred from the water surface to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using facile transfer techniques. We employ a transferred single PCBM nanosheet as the active material in a field-effect transistor (FET) and verify semiconductor function by a measured electron mobility of 1.2 × 10–2 cm2 V–1 s–1 and an on–off ratio of ∼1 × 104. We further fabricate a planar organic/organic heterostructure with the p-type organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) as the bottom layer and the n-type PCBM nanosheet as the top layer and demonstrate ambipolar FET operation with an electron mobility of 8.7 × 10–4 cm2 V–1 s–1 and a hole mobility of 3.1 × 10–4 cm2V–1 s–1.

  • 6.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Larsen, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Solution-Based Phototransformation of C-60 Nanorods: Towards Improved Electronic Devices2013In: Particle & particle systems characterization, ISSN 0934-0866, E-ISSN 1521-4117, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 715-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modified liquid-liquid interface precipitation synthesis of C-60 nanorods, effects and opportunities following an in situ photochemical transformation in the liquid state, and an electronic characterization using a field-effect transistor (FET) geometry are reported. The nanorods feature a high aspect ratio of approximate to 10(3) and a notably small average diameter of 172 nm. Interestingly, it is found that a decreased nanorod diameter appears to correlate with distinctly improved electronic properties, and an average electron mobility of 0.30 cm(2) V-1 s(-1), as measured in a FET geometry, is reported for as-grown nanorods, with the peak value being an impressive 1.0 cm(2) V-1 s(-1). A photoexposure using green laser light ( = 532 nm) is demonstrated to result in the formation of a polymer-C-60 shell encapsulating a monomer-C-60 bulk; such photo-transformed nanorods exhibit an electron mobility of 4.7 x 10(-3) cm(2) V-1 s(-1). It is notable that the utilized FET geometry only probes the polymer-C-60 nanorod surface shell, and that the monomer-C-60 bulk is anticipated to exhibit a higher mobility. Importantly, photoexposed nanorods can be conveniently processed as a stabile dispersion in common hydrophobic solvents, and this finding is attributed to the insoluble character of the polymer-C-60 shell.

  • 7.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Malolepszy, Artur
    Stobinski, Leszek
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Water assisted growth of C60 rods and tubes by liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation method2012In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 6840-6853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    C60 nanorods with hexagonal cross sections are grown using a static liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation method in a system of C60/m-dichlorobenzene solution and ethanol. Adding water to the ethanol phase leads instead to C60 tubes where both length and diameter of the C60 tubes can be controlled by the water content in the ethanol. Based on our observations we find that the diameter of the rods/tubes strongly depends on the nucleation step. We propose a liquid-liquid interface growth model of C60 rods and tubes based on the diffusion rate of the good C60 containing solvent into the poor solvent as well as on the size of the crystal seeds formed at the interface between the two solvents. The grown rods and tubes exhibit a hexagonal solvate crystal structure with m-dichlorobenzene solvent molecules incorporated into the crystal structure, independent of the water content. An annealing step at 200 °C at a pressure <1 kPa transforms the grown structures into a solvent-free face centered cubic structure. Both the hexagonal and the face centered cubic structures are very stable and neither morphology nor structure shows any signs of degradation after three months of storage.

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  • 8.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, USA.
    Pham, Thang
    Talyzin, Alexandr V.
    Zettl, Alex
    Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons inside boron nitride nanotubes2016In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 253, no 12, p. 2377-2379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on bottom-up synthesis of graphene nanoribbons inside boron nitride nanotubes, using coronene molecules as building blocks. The synthesized ribbons are one or two coronene molecules wide, depending on the diameter of the host nanotube. The encapsulated carbon nanostructures can be eliminated from the inner cavity of the filled boron nitride nanotube via oxidation without any damage to the nanotube structure.

  • 9.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA; Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Div Mat Sci, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA; Univ Calif Berkeley, Kavli Energy NanoSci Inst, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA; Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Yan, Aiming
    Coh, Sinisa
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Dunn, Gabriel
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Louie, Steven G.
    Cohen, Marvin L.
    Zettl, Alex
    Electrostatically Driven Nanoballoon Actuator2016In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 6787-6791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate an inflatable nanoballoon actuator based on geometrical transitions between the inflated (cylindrical) and collapsed (flattened) forms of a carbon nanotube. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments employing a nanoelectromechanical manipulator show that a collapsed carbon nanotube can be reinflated by electrically charging the nanotube, thus realizing an electrostatically driven nanoballoon actuator. We find that the tube actuator can be reliably cycled with only modest control voltages (few volts) with no apparent wear or fatigue. A complementary theoretical analysis identifies critical parameters for nanotube nanoballoon actuation.

  • 10.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
    Yan, Aiming
    Coh, Sinisa
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Ojeda-Aristizabal, Claudia
    Dunn, Gabriel
    Cohen, Marvin L.
    Louie, Steven G.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Zettl, Alex
    Spontaneous twisting of a collapsed carbon nanotube2017In: Nano Reseach, ISSN 1998-0124, E-ISSN 1998-0000, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1942-1949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the collapsing and subsequent spontaneous twisting of a carbon nanotube by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A custom-sized nanotube is first created in the microscope by selectively extracting shells from a parent multi-walled tube. The few-walled, large-diameter daughter nanotube is driven to collapse via mechanical stimulation, after which the ribbon-like collapsed tube spontaneously twists along its long axis. In situ diffraction experiments fully characterize the uncollapsed and collapsed tubes. The experimental observations and associated theoretical analysis indicate that the origin of the twisting is compressive strain.

  • 11.
    Barzegar, HamidReza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Based One-Dimensional Structures: Tuning Physical and Chemical Properties2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon nanostructures have been extensively used in different applications; ranging from electronic and optoelectronic devices to energy conversion. The interest stems from the fact that covalently bonded carbon atoms can form a wide variety of structures with zero-, one- and two-dimensional configuration with different physical properties. For instance, while fullerene molecules (zero-dimensional carbon structures) realize semiconductor behavior, two-dimensional graphene shows metallic behavior with exceptional electron mobility. Moreover the possibility to even further tune these fascinating properties by means of doping, chemical modification and combining carbon based sub-classes into new hybrid structures make the carbon nanostructure even more interesting for practical application. 

    This thesis focuses on synthesizing SWCNT and different C60 one-dimensional structures as well as tuning their properties by means of different chemical and structural modification. The purpose of the study is to have better understanding of the synthesis and modification techniques, which opens for better control over the properties of the product for desired applications.

    In this thesis carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on iron/cobalt catalyst particles. The effect of catalyst particle size on the diameter of the grown CNTs is systematically studied and in the case of SWCNTs it is shown that the chirality distribution of the grown SWCNTs can be tuned by altering the catalyst particle composition. In further experiments, incorporation of the nitrogen atoms in SWCNTs structures is examined. A correlation between experimental characterization techniques and theoretical calculation enable for precise analysis of different types of nitrogen configuration in SWCNTs structure and in particular their effect on growth termination and electronic properties of SWCNTs are studied.

    C60 one-dimensional structures are grown through a solution based method known as Liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation (LLIP). By controlling the crystal seed formation at the early stage of the growth the morphology and size of the grown C60 one-dimensional structures where tuned from nanorods to large diameter rods and tubes. We further introduce a facile solution-based method to photo-polymerize the as-grown C60 nanorods, and show that such a method crates a polymeric C60 shell around the nanorods. The polymeric C60 shell exhibits high stability against common hydrophobic C60 solvents, which makes the photo-polymerized nanorods ideal for further solution-based processing. This is practically shown by decoration of both as grown and photo-polymerized nanorods by palladium nanoparticles and comparison between their electrochemical activities. The electrical properties of the C60 nanorods are also examined by utilizing a field effect transistor geometry comprising different C60 nanorods.

    In the last part of the study a variant of CNT is synthesized in which large diameter, few-walled CNTs spontaneously transform to a collapsed ribbon shape structure, the so called collapsed carbon nanotube (CCNT). By inserting C60 molecules into the duct edges of CCNT a new hybrid structure comprising C60 molecules and CCNT is synthesized and characterized. A further C60 insertion lead to reinflation of CCNTs, which eventually form few-walled CNT completely filled with C60 molecules.

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  • 12.
    de Andres, Aitor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Bhadoria, Shikha
    Marmolejo, Javier
    Muschet, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Fischer, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Blackburn, Tom
    Gonoskov, Arkady
    Hanstorp, Dag
    Marklund, Mattias
    Veisz, Laszlo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Dynamics of vacuum laser accelerated electrons from nanotipsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13. Dunn, Gabriel
    et al.
    Shen, Konlin
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States ‡ Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden § Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States ∥ Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.
    Shi, Wu
    Belling, Jason N.
    Nguyen, Tran N.H.
    Barkovich, Emil
    Chism, Kyle
    Maharbiz, Michel M:
    DeWeese, Michael R:
    Zettl, Alex
    Selective Insulation of Carbon nanotubes2017In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 254, no 11, article id 1700202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a method for the selective encapsulation of carbonnanotubes in thin parylene films using iron as a sacrificial lift-off layer. Theiron serves as an inhibitor of parylene deposition and prevents the parylenemolecules from linking, thus facilitating selective area coating after lift-off.

  • 14.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Yan, Aiming
    Zettl, Alex
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Fabrication of One-Dimensional Zigzag [6,6]-Phenyl-C-61-Butyric Acid Methyl Ester Nanoribbons from Two-Dimensional Nanosheets2015In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 10516-10522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One-dimensional (10) zigzag [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) nanoribbons are produced by folding two-dimensional ultrathin PCBM nanosheets in a simple solvent process. The unique 1D PCBM nanostructures exhibit uniform width of 3.8 +/- 0.3 nm, equivalent to four PCBM molecules, and lengths of 20-400 nm. These nanoribbons show well-defined crystalline structure, comprising PCBM molecules in a hexagonal arrangement without trapped solvent molecules. First-principle calculations and detailed experimental characterization provide an insight into the structure and formation mechanism of the 1D PCBM nanoribbons. Given their dimensions and physical properties, we foresee that these nanostructures should be ideal as acceptor material in organic solar cells.

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  • 15.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.
    Zettl, Alex
    Coronene-based graphene nanoribbons insulated by boron nitride nanotubes: electronic properties of the hybrid structure2018In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 12930-12935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a theoretical study on the formation of graphene nanoribbons-via polymerization of coronene molecules-inside the inner cavity of boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the electronic property of the hybrid system, and we show that the boron nitride nanotube does not significantly alter the electronic properties of the encapsulated graphene nanoribbon. Motivated by previous experimental works, we examine graphene nanoribbons with two different widths and investigate probable scenarios for defect formation and/or twisting of the resulting graphene nanoribbons and their effect on the electronic properties of the hybrid system.

  • 16. Hedman, Daniel
    et al.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.
    Rosen, Arne
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Larsson, J. Andreas
    On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes2015In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product's relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth.

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  • 17.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Mikolajczuk, Ania
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys Chem, PL-01224 Warsaw, Poland.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm Univ, Arrhenius Lab, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borodzinski, Andrzej
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys Chem, PL-01224 Warsaw, Poland.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Palladium nanocrystals supported on helical carbon nanofibers for highly efficient electro-oxidation of formic acid, methanol and ethanol in alkaline electrolytes2012In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 209, p. 236-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the synthesis of palladium nanocrystals self-assembled on helical carbon nanofibers functionalized with benzyl mercaptan (Pd-S-HCNFs) and their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of formic acid, methanol and ethanol. Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) were first functionalized with benzyl mercaptan based on the pi-pi interactions between phenyl rings and the graphitic surface of HCNFs. Palladium nano crystals (PdNC) were fixed on the surface of functionalized HCNF by Pd-S bonds in a simple self-assembly method. The as-prepared materials were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and fuel cell tests. CV characterization of the as-prepared materials shows a very high electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of formic acid, ethanol and methanol in strong alkaline electrolyte. In comparison to commercial catalyst Vulcan XC-72 decorated with Pd nanoparticles, the proposed Pd-S-HCNFs nano composite material shows oxidation currents for formic acid, ethanol and methanol at the Pd-S-HCNF-modified electrode that are higher than that at the Pd/XC-72 modified electrode with a factor of 2.0, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. In a formic acid fuel cell the Pd-S-HCNF modified electrode yields equal power density as commercial Pd/XC-72 catalyst. Our results show that Pd-decorated helical carbon nanofibers with diameters around 40-60 nm have very high potential as active material in fuel cells, electrocatalysts and sensors. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ma, Jingyuan
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Jia, Xueen
    Shchukarev, Andrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lu, Lu
    Ma, Chuansheng
    Yang, Guang
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Small palladium islands embedded in palladium-tungsten bimetallic nanoparticles form catalytic hotspots for oxygen reduction2014In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. Article number: 5253-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sluggish kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode side of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is one major technical challenge for realizing sustainable solutions for the transportation sector. Finding efficient yet cheap electrocatalysts to speed up this reaction therefore motivates researchers all over the world. Here we demonstrate an efficient synthesis of palladium-tungsten bimetallic nanoparticles supported on ordered mesoporous carbon. Despite a very low percentage of noble metal (palladium: tungsten = 1:8), the hybrid catalyst material exhibits a performance equal to commercial 60% platinum/Vulcan for the oxygen reduction process. The high catalytic efficiency is explained by the formation of small palladium islands embedded at the surface of the palladium-tungsten bimetallic nanoparticles, generating catalytic hotspots. The palladium islands are similar to 1 nm in diameter, and contain 10-20 palladium atoms that are segregated at the surface. Our results may provide insight into the formation, stabilization and performance of bimetallic nanoparticles for catalytic reactions.

  • 19.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jia, Xueen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Reduction free room temperature synthesis of a durable and efficient Pd/ordered mesoporous carbon composite electrocatalyst for alkaline direct alcohols fuel cell2014In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 676-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of easy and environmentally benign synthesis methods of efficient electrocatalysts for use in energy conversion applications motivates researchers all over the world. Here we report a novel and versatile method to synthesize well-dispersed palladium-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons (Pd/OMCs) at room temperature without any reducing agent by one-pot mixing of tri(dibenzylideneacetone)palladium(0) (Pd2DBA3) and OMCs together in a common N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution. The formation of Pd nanoparticles and their crystallization on the OMC is catalyzed by protons in the solution and can thus be controlled by the solution pH. The complete process and the as-prepared nanocomposite was characterized by UV-spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (HTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrocatalytic property of the as-decorated material was examined with cyclic voltammetry (CV). The Pd/OMC composite shows up to two times higher electrocatalytic ability with a significantly better durability towards ethanol and methanol oxidation in alkaline media compared to commercial high surface area conductive carbon black Vulcan XC-72 decorated with equivalent Pd nanoparticles. Our described method provides new insight for the development of highly efficient carbon based nanocatalysts by simple and environmentally sound methods.

  • 20.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Self-assembled palladium nanocrystals on helical carbon nanofibers as enhanced electrocatalysts for electro-oxidation of small molecules2012In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 22, no 17, p. 8541-8548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel approach to prepare helical carbon nanofibers homogeneously functionalized with single crystal palladium nanoparticles via a phase-transfer method. The materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and electrochemical measurements. We find that homogeneous and small single-crystal Pd nanoparticles can be easily functionalized with phenyl mercaptan, transferred into the toluene phase from the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) phase and then non-covalently self-assembled onto the surface of helical carbon nanofibers with a very good dispersion and homogeneous diameters of 4.5 +/- 0.6 nm. The palladium-helical carbon nanofiber composite exhibits significantly higher electrochemical active area and electrocatalytic activity towards the electrooxidation of formic acid, ethanol and methanol than the commercial electrocatalyst Pd/Vulcan XC-72. Our results show that the prepared material can be potentially used as an advanced nano-electrocatalyst in a direct alkaline fuel cell system.

  • 21.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Phase-transfer synthesis of amorphous palladium nanoparticle-functionalized 3D helical carbon nanofibers and its highly catalytic performance towards hydrazine oxidation2012In: Chemical Physics Letters, ISSN 0009-2614, E-ISSN 1873-4448, Vol. 543, p. 96-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous palladium nanoparticles functionalized helical carbon nanofibers (ApPd-HCNFs) were synthesized using a phase-transfer method. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NP) were first prepared using n-dodecyl sulfide as reducing agent and stabilizing ligands in ethanol. The Pd-NPs were then modified with benzyl mercaptan and transferred into a toluene solution with HCNFs which were decorated with amorphous palladium. The materials were characterized with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry showing that amorphous palladium nanoparticles were uniformly anchored at the HCNFs surface and that the ApPd-HCNFs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity towards hydrazine oxidation. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Iqbal, Javed
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan.
    Enevold, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Larsen, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wang, Jia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Revoju, Srikanth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Eliasson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    An arylene-vinylene based donor-acceptor-donor small molecule for the donor compound in high-voltage organic solar cells2016In: Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, ISSN 0927-0248, E-ISSN 1879-3398, Vol. 155, p. 348-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) molecule has been designed and synthesized for use as the electron donating material in solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs). The D-A-D molecule comprises a central electron-accepting (2Z,2'Z)-2,2'-(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-1,4-phenylene)bis(3-(thiophen-2-yl)acry lonitrile) (ZOPTAN) core, which is chemically connected to two peripheral and electron-donating triphenylamine (TPA) units. The ZOPTAN-TPA molecule features a low HOMO level of -5.2 eV and an optical energy gap of 2.1 eV. Champion OSCs based on a solution-processed and non-annealed active material blend of [6,6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and ZOPTAN-TPA in a mass ratio of 2:1 exhibits a power conversion efficiency of 1.9% and a high open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V. 

  • 23.
    Jia, Xueen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Synthesis of Palladium/Helical Carbon Nanofiber Hybrid Nanostructures and Their Application for Hydrogen Peroxide and Glucose Detection2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 22, p. 12017-12022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a novel sensing platform for H2O2 and glucose based on immobilization of palladium-helical carbon nanofiber (Pd-HCNF) hybrid nanostnictures and glucose oxidase (GOx) with Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). HCNFs were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process on a C-60-supported Pd catalyst. Pd-HCNF nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step reduction free method in dimethylformamide (DMF). The prepared materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The Nafion/Pd-HCNF/GCE sensor exhibits excellent electrocatalytic sensitivity toward H2O2 (315 mA M-1 cm(-2)) as probed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. We show that Pd-HCNF-modified electrodes significantly reduce the overpotential and enhance the electron transfer rate. A linear range from 5.0 mu M to 2.1 mM with a detection limit of 3.0 mu M (based on the S/N = 3) and good reproducibility were obtained. Furthermore, a sensing platform for glucose was prepared by immobilizing the Pd-HCNFs and glucose oxidase (GOx) with Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response to glucose with a wide linear range (0.06-6.0 mM) with a detection limit of 0.03 mM and a sensitivity of 13 mA M-1 cm(-2). We show that small size and homogeneous distribution of the Pd nanoparticles in combination with good conductivity and large surface area of the HCNFs lead to a H2O2 and glucose sensing platform that performs in the top range of the herein reported sensor platforms.

  • 24.
    Larsen, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    On the fabrication of crystalline C-60 nanorod transistors from solution2012In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 23, no 34, p. 344015-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible and high-aspect-ratio C-60 nanorods are synthesized using a liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation process. As-grown nanorods are shown to exhibit a hexagonal close-packed single-crystal structure, with m-dichlorobenzene solvent molecules incorporated into the crystalline structure in a C-60:m-dichlorobenzene ratio of 3.2. An annealing step at 200 degrees C transforms the nanorods into a solvent-free face-centred-cubic polycrystalline structure. The nanorods are deposited onto field-effect transistor structures using two solvent-based techniques: drop-casting and dip-coating. We find that dip-coating deposition results in a preferred alignment of non-bundled nanorods and a satisfying transistor performance. The latter is quantified by the attainment of an electron mobility of 0.08 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) and an on/off ratio of >10(4) for a single-crystal nanorod transistor, fabricated with a solution-based and low-temperature process that is compatible with flexible substrates.

  • 25.
    Miranda la Hera, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Mena Gómez, Josué
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Carvajal, Joan J.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Electronic properties of v-shaped gan pitsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Miranda la Hera, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Mena Gómez, Josué
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Departament de Química Física i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain.
    Canto-Aguilar, Esdras
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Carvajal, Joan J.
    Departament de Química Física i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Electronic properties of hexagonal v-shaped gallium nitride pits2023In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 127, no 51, p. 24658-24665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the morphology, surface composition, and electronic properties of porous GaN films containing hexagonal V-shaped pits were studied. The V-pits are orientated along the [0001] direction of GaN, and we observed a clear relation between the growth time with the surface composition, film thickness, and pit morphology, which in turn had a significant impact on the band gap, valence band maximum, and the work function. The effect on the position of the valence band maximum and work function is explained by the formation of superficial oxygen-rich phases such as Ga2O3 and nonstoichiometric GaNxOy as supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). We further show a change in the optical band gap with the thickness of the porous films explained by a change in the tensile strain caused by open-core screw dislocations that gives rise to the formation of V-pits. The correlation between strain and the band gap is supported by DFT calculations. Our study provides insights into the intricate relation between surface states and electronic properties of semiconducting materials and offers directions for designing GaN heterojunctions with specific optical and electronic properties.

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  • 27.
    Miranda la Hera, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wu, Xiuyu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Mena, Josué
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Ashok, Anumol
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Koroidov, Sergey
    Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Controlled synthesis of tellurium nanowires by physical vapor deposition2022In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 12, no 23, article id 4137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One-dimensional tellurium nanostructures can exhibit distinct electronic properties from those seen in bulk Te. The electronic properties of nanostructured Te are highly dependent on their morphology, and thus controlled synthesis processes are required. Here, highly crystalline tellurium nanowires were produced via physical vapour deposition. We used growth temperature, heating rate, flow of the carrier gas, and growth time to control the degree of supersaturation in the region where Te nanostructures are grown. The latter leads to a control in the nucleation and morphology of Te nanostructures. We observed that Te nanowires grow via the vapour–solid mechanism where a Te particle acts as a seed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction studies revealed that Te nanowires have a trigonal crystal structure and grow along the (0001) direction. Their diameter can be tuned from 26 to 200 nm with lengths from 8.5 to 22 μm, where the highest aspect ratio of 327 was obtained for wires measuring 26 nm in diameter and 8.5 μm in length. We investigated the use of bismuth as an additive to reduce the formation of tellurium oxides, and we discuss the effect of other growth parameters.

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  • 28.
    Nitze, Florian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wagberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Easy synthesis of Pd fullerene polymer structures from the molten state of tris(dibenzylideneacetone)dipalladium(0)2012In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 249, no 12, p. 2588-2591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pd fullerene composites were first synthesized and studied in the early 90s by for example Nagashima et al. In this study we present a novel and rapid approach to synthesize Pd fullerides based on direct reaction of C60 with Pd2dba3. We show that the Pd fullerene polymer phase forms at temperatures around the melting point of Pd2dba3 (150 degrees C) and that it proceeds upon further annealing while releasing dba. The synthesis reactions were studied in TGA/DSC. TEM revealed that the material easily collapses under the electron beam into nanoparticles. Under very low doses almost no particles can be found. Similarly, Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of Pd fulleride polymers but also supported the collapse of the Pd fulleride phase when irradiated by high laser power. CVD experiments have been conducted on directly coated Si substrates showing similar results to previous reports, namely that Pd2C60 is an efficient catalysts for the growth of helical carbon nanofibers. Our study gives both insights into the formation of nanoparticles as well as the synthesis of C60 polymers. The method is also compatible with direct coating processes making it useful for a broad spectrum of CVD and catalysis applications. (C) 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  • 29.
    Nitze, Florian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sandström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Mazurkiewicz, Marta
    Malolepszy, Artur
    Stobinski, Leszek
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Direct support mixture painting, using Pd(0) organo-metallic compounds - an easy and environmentally sound approach to combine decoration and electrode preparation for fuel cells2014In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 2, no 48, p. 20973-20979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inventive, fast and straight-forward approach for the direct preparation of fuel cell electrodes has been developed and tested. Our approach avoids long catalyst preparation and post-synthesis treatment. It reduces the use of chemicals and thereby concomitantly lowers the environmental impact and improves cost efficiency. It combines decoration of the support by palladium nanoparticles with electrode preparation through a simple one-step ink-painting and annealing process. Composites have been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Xray diffraction. Crystalline particles are well-attached and well-distributed on the support. Particles are of few nanometers in size and spherical for decorated Vulcan whereas they are larger and irregularly shaped for decorated helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs). Electrodes with a metal loading of 0.8 mg cm(-2) have been tested in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Both the Vulcan and the HCNF electrodes show a similar and high power output of up to 120 mW mg(-1). They also show similar performances in deactivation experiments conducted at 200 mA cm(-2) even when using only high purity grade formic acid. After deactivation the electrodes show no structural damage, making them superior to most commercial catalysts. The electrodes can be completely regenerated to initial activity by simple treatment with water. The easy regeneration process indicates that CO-adsorption on the fuel cell anode catalyst is not the main poisoning mechanism responsible for electrode degeneration.

  • 30.
    Rafei, Mouna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Miranda la Hera, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Study on the electronic and structural properties of copper oxide filmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Rafei, Mouna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Miranda la Hera, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Study on the electronic and structural properties of oxidized copper films2022In: AIP Advances, E-ISSN 2158-3226, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 105203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed study of the oxidation of Cu substrates was carried out under controlled conditions by regulating the pressure, atmosphere composition, process time, and temperature. By tuning the synthesis conditions, the formation of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) or cupric oxide (CuO) could be preferentially promoted. The oxidation temperature was varied from 400 to 1050 °C, and a gradual oxidation of metallic Cu to Cu2O was achieved at mild oxidation conditions (400-600 °C), while the formation of CuO was only observed at higher temperatures (≥900 °C). The surface morphology was also affected changing from a highly granular texture (400 °C) with grain sizes between 0.59 ± 0.15 μm to smooth large crystallites (≥900 °C) with a size within 2.76 ± 0.97 μm. We also show that by controlling the oxidation temperature (400-1050 °C), it is possible to tune the work function and the ionization potential of the resulting Cu2O/CuO film, properties that are important for various optoelectronic applications.

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  • 32.
    Sandström, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Annamalai, Alagappan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Persson, Per
    Linköping University.
    Persson, Ingemar
    Linköping University.
    Ekspong, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Microwave-Induced Structural Ordering of Resilient Nanostructured L10-FePt Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction2020In: ACS Applied Energy Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 9785-9791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show how structurally ordered L10 face-centered tetragonal (fct) FePt nanoparticles are produced by a solid-state microwave-assisted synthesis method. The structural phase as well as the incorporated Fe into the nanoparticles is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments. The prepared particles exhibit a remarkable resilience toward crystallite growth at high temperatures. Directly correlated to the L10 phase, the best oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) characteristics are achieved for particles with a 1:1 Fe:Pt atomic ratio and an average size of ~2.9 nm where Pt-specific evaluation provided a high mass and specific activity of ~570 A/gPt and ~600 μA/cm2Pt respectively. Our results demonstrate that well-structured catalysts possessing activities vastly exceeding Pt/C (~210 A/gPt & ~250 μA/cm2Pt), can be synthesized through a fast and highly eco-friendly method. We note that the achieved mass activity represent a significant leap toward the theoretical maximum for fully ordered FePt nanoparticles.

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  • 33.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Jia, Xueen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nordblad, Per
    Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Formation of nitrogen-doped graphene nanoscrolls by adsorption of magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles2013In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 2319-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene nanoscrolls are Archimedean-type spirals formed by rolling single-layer graphene sheets. Their unique structure makes them conceptually interesting and understanding their formation gives important information on the manipulation and characteristics of various carbon nanostructures. Here we report a 100% efficient process to transform nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets into homogeneous nanoscrolls by decoration with magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Through a large number of control experiments, magnetic characterization of the decorated nanoparticles, and ab initio calculations, we conclude that the rolling is initiated by the strong adsorption of maghemite nanoparticles at nitrogen defects in the graphene lattice and their mutual magnetic interaction. The nanoscroll formation is fully reversible and upon removal of the maghemite nanoparticles, the nanoscrolls return to open sheets. Besides supplying information on the rolling mechanism of graphene nanoscrolls, our results also provide important information on the stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  • 34.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Mazurkiewicz, Marta
    Malolepszy, Artur
    Stobinski, Leszek
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitrogen doped multi walled carbon nanotubes produced by CVD-correlating XPS and Raman spectroscopy for the study of nitrogen inclusion2012In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 3535-3541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High purity aligned nitrogen doped multi walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method using pyridine and Fe/Co (2:1 volume ratio) as the single C/N precursor and catalyst material. The average diameter of the synthesized tubes ranges between 29 nm and 57 nm and the nitrogen content of the tubes reaches a maximum of 9.2 (at.)% nitrogen. The effect of nitrogen doping on the Raman scattering of doped tubes and its correlation with X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) was investigated. The analysis is based on the investigation of the I-D/I-G (integrated area ratio), other nitrogen characteristic Raman modes and the type of nitrogen inclusion interpreted from the N 1s electron bonding energies in XPS. At doping levels higher than 5% the nitrogen inclusion takes place through another mechanism than at low nitrogen doping levels. Most significant is that pyridinic defects are relatively readily incorporated at low nitrogen doping levels while at nitrogen content higher than 5% the major incorporation mechanism is dominated by pyridinic and pyrrolic defects on an equal basis. Our study gives further insight into nitrogen doping effects and the relation between type of nitrogen inclusion and nitrogen doping levels. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, 77005, USA.
    Xie, Yu
    Zhang, Xiang
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 94720-1234, USA.
    Lei, Jincheng
    Coulter, Gabriel
    Sun, Shiyun
    Tiwary, Chandrasekhar
    Zettl, Alex
    Yakobson, Boris
    Ajayan, Pulickel M.
    Graphene as an electrochemical transfer layer2019In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 141, p. 266-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability of graphene to adopt a property from an adjacent material is investigated by measuring the electrochemical performance of a monolayer graphene placed on top of thin cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanosheets. In this assembly, monolayer graphene works as an interfacial layer which inhibits the direct contact of the actual electroactive material and electrolyte during electrochemical reaction. The results show that while graphene is electrochemically inert, it behaves as an active material to catalyze oxygen evolution reaction (OER) once placed on top of Co3O4 nanosheets. The graphene-covered Co3O4 model system shows electrochemical performance similar to Co3O4 indicating complete transference of the electrochemical property of the metal oxide to the graphene. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, charge transfer from graphene to Co3O4 is the key factor for turning the electrochemically inactive graphene to an apparent active material. 

  • 36.
    Zhang, Ying
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Liu, Shuang
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Yao, Zhen
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Dong, Jiajun
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Liu, Bo
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Liu, Ran
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Du, Mingrun
    Civil Aviation University of China, College of Science, Tianjin, China.
    Wang, Peng
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Li, Quanjun
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Zettl, Alex
    Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Kavli Energy Nano Science Institute at the University of California at Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA, Berkeley, United States.
    Yao, Mingguang
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Liu, Bingbing
    State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Capture of novel sp3 hybridized Z-BN by compressing boron nitride nanotubes with small diameter2022In: Diamond and related materials, ISSN 0925-9635, E-ISSN 1879-0062, Vol. 130, article id 109431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental synthesis of new sp3 hybridized carbon/boron nitride structures remains challenging despite that numerous sp3 structures have been proposed in theory. Here, we showed that compressed multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) and boron nitride peapods (C60@BNNTs) with small diameters could transform into a new sp3 hybridized boron nitride allotrope (Z-BN). This strategy is considered from the topological transition point of view in boron nitride nanotubes upon compression. Due to the increased curvature in compressed small-diameter MWBNNTs, the uncommon 4- and 8-membered rings in Z-BN could be more favorably formed. And the irreversible tube collapse is proved to be a critical factor for the capture of the formed Z-BN, because of the competition between the resilience of tube before collapse and the stress limitation for the lattice stabilization of Z-BN upon decompression. In this case, Z-BN starts to form above 19.0 GPa, which is fully reversible below 45 GPa and finally becomes quenchable at 93.5 GPa. This collapse-induced capture of the high-pressure phase could also be extended to other tubular materials for quenching novel sp3 structures.

1 - 36 of 36
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