Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    Department System Transition, Division Built Environment, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Plummer, Paul
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Socio-techno-ecological transition dynamics in the re-territorialization of food production: the case of wild berries in Sweden2024In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent geopolitical and economic crises underline the need for a European transition towards a more sustainable food system. Scholars and policymakers have called for a re-territorialization of food production to strike a better balance between local, regional and global value chains. This paper explores the role of re-territorialization through an analysis of the emergence, development and current transformation of the Swedish wild berry value chain. The analysis combines the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions with a socio-techno-ecological system approach and draws on interviews, informal conversations, participant observations and a range of secondary sources. The resulting case narrative shows how processes of de-territorialization may result in regimes that fail to address sustainability potential and problems. It also highlights that processes of re-territorialization challenge established regimes by promoting niches that represent different, albeit complementary, value chain configurations. Apart from a rich empirical narrative that brings useful knowledge to stakeholders to the Swedish wild berry value chain, the paper contributes to the theoretical understanding re-territorialization, shows how the ecological dimension can be accounted for with the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions and presents a number of general policy implications.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Axelsson, Linn
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Emerging topologies of transnational employment: 'Posting' Thai workers in Sweden’s wild berry industry beyond regulatory reach2018In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 89, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests a need to pay closer attention to the fact that employment is increasingly stretched across several regulatory regimes. This may help explain why governments, which rely on national legislative frameworks, struggle to protect the interests of transnationally mobile low-skilled workers. By adopting a topological approach to state regulation and authority, the paper demonstrates how powerful actors have reconfigured employment in Sweden’s wild berry industry in a spatial sense by engaging transnational subcontractors. It argues that transnational subcontracting inserts distance into employment relationships, thereby creating precarious migrant workers whose simultaneous absence and presence in several regulatory regimes places them partly beyond the regulatory reach of any one nation-state or nationally based trade union. The paper also argues that the Swedish government’s response to precarious working conditions in the wild berry industry can be understood as a series of attempts aimed at bringing transnational employment relationships within its regulatory reach. Drawing on topological spatial vocabulary, it shows how these attempts are less about the movement of state infrastructure into transnational space than about the stretching and folding of space itself, in an attempt to establish a powerful Swedish presence across distance. On the other hand, the paper concludes that transnational subcontracting opens up a space which enables wild berry actors to circumvent regulations and, as such, it remains very difficult for the Swedish government to reach into employment relationships in this industry.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Pettersson, Nils
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Qian
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Re-visiting the 'black box' of migration: state-intermediary co-production of regulatory spaces of labour migration2022In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 594-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now widely held that a variety of intermediary actors, including recruitment and staffing agencies, multinational corporations and local brokers, shape labour migration. This paper argues that in order to better understand the global circulation of labour it is necessary to explore the involvement of these actors in the production of the regulatory spaces through which migrant labour is brokered. Indeed, migration intermediaries do not only navigate borders on behalf of their migrant clients. Nor is ‘the state’ primarily a backdrop against which the understanding of the role of intermediaries may be developed. Instead, we argue, regulatory spaces of labour migration are made and remade through direct and indirect exchanges and interactions between intermediaries and state actors. Through an analysis of three moments of regulatory change in Sweden, the paper shows that such interaction does not take place in an even landscape but, rather, that the ability of migration intermediaries to influence the regulation of migration lies in the capacity to form close relationships or establish a powerful presence. A focus on the dynamic co-production of regulatory spaces by intermediaries and state actors, in our view, offers a more nuanced account of how labour migration currently is brokered and regulated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Downshifting Dutch Rural Tourism Entrepreneurs in Sweden: Challenges, Opportunities and Implications for the Swedish Welfare State2020In: Tourism Employment in Nordic Countries: Trends, Practices, and Opportunities / [ed] Walmsley, Andreas; Åberg, Kajsa; Blinnikka, Petra; Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 303-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers a much-needed exploration of downshifting in the context of lifestyle migration and tourism entrepreneurship. Analysing results from 12 interviews with Dutch tourism entrepreneurs in rural Sweden, it draws attention to gender issues in male and female reasoning around motivations for migration and their daily business practices. It illustrates gender differences in downshifting, since more women work in tourism, while men find employment in other sectors and in less rural areas. The authors relate this with social and spatial inequality in the Swedish welfare state. They conclude with reflections on implications of increased downshifting practices for Sweden, and suggestions for future research.

  • 5.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Nuga, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hållbara livsstilar och föreställningar om landsbygd2021In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 72-73, p. 194-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussioner om nedväxling, frivillig enkelhet och omställning förekommer i tidningar, radio, tv och allt fler fora på sociala medier. Där avhandlas allt från jordnära ting som grönsaksodling och självförsörjning till systemförändringar som ska förhindra överexploatering av jordens resurser eller livsstilsförändringar med syfte att hoppa av ekorrhjulet. Vi som ligger bakom den här texten är kulturgeografer och forskare på Institutionen för geografi vid Umeå universitet. Texten syftar till att presentera vår tolkning av fenomenet nedväxling inte bara med hänsyn till våra professionella erfarenheter, utan också med hänsyn till våra respektive bakgrunder och värderingar kring hållbara livsstilar.

  • 6.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Nuga, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Is downshifting easier in the countryside?: focus group visions on individual sustainability transitions2020In: Dipping in to the North: living, working and traveling in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 195-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, few geographic studies focus on downshifting in Sweden. We address this gap and use 'downshifting' to describe a process in which people become aware of the downsides of their hectic lifestyles, and to analyse modern society as a context from which this process arises. During the 2019 Transition Conference in Umeå, we conducted a focus group workshop to address the questions 'how do you describe your desired lifestyle?' and 'how do you relate these lifestyles with your place perceptions?'. One conclusion is that inner transition is as important as spatial relocation. The participants indicated that both urban and rural areas can enable and hinder sustainable lifestyles. Policy makers need to know how these potential downshifters reason around optimal settlement sizes.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Thailändska bärplockare i svenska skogar: En nutidshistorisk tillbakablick2022In: Västerbotten förr & nu, E-ISSN 2003-6698Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Thailändska bärplockare har länge varit ett återkommande sommartecken i de svenska skogarna som en viktig del av den allt mer globaliserade bärindustrin. Arbetet i de svenska bärskogarna har betytt mycket för många thailändska risbönders försörjning samtidigt som bärindustrin har kantats av skandaler som rör trafficking och exploatering av arbetare.

  • 8.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Chihaya, Guilherme Kenji
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Nord universitet, Bodø, Norway; Institute of Analytical Sociology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    New immigration destinations in Sweden: migrant residential trajectories intersecting rural areas2024In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 280-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to examine the residential trajectories of immigrants that intersect rural areas in Sweden. It adds to the literature on new immigration destinations (NIDs) and addresses the need to include migration routes intersecting rural areas, immigrants’ secondary migration patterns and temporal dimensions of migration, as well as the multiplicity of migrants in such destinations. We examine whether NIDs have emerged in Sweden and immigrants’ subsequent internal mobility from such areas and its determinants. Employing sequence analysis to full-population register data, we identify typical migration pathways. According to the results, NIDs are an emerging phenomenon in rural and small-sized cities in Sweden. We find limited support for the Swedish discourse that the diverse groups of rural migrants leave soon after arrival; also, those leaving are not doing so for labour market–related reasons, nor are they heading for metropolitan areas. We suggest that NIDs offer an important contribution to understanding migration patterns.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    'Doing gender' in the wild berry industry: transforming the role of Thai women in rural Sweden 1980–20122016In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 169-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Doing gender' has often been used as the theoretical entrance for research on gender issues in the social sciences. However, research has been accused of using the concept in a 'ceremonial' way, treating gendered structures as static. In response to this claim, this article investigates the process of 'hierarchization', or how gendered and racial hierarchies occur through everyday practices and political and economic contexts in the rural, wild berry industry in contemporary Sweden. The industry has gone through a thorough transformation, from irregular and small-scale production to regularized and large-scale production, which has affected the intersection of gender and racial structures. In particular, Thai women have gone from being active participants both as entrepreneurs and as workers, to working under native men, or being passive receivers of men's remittances. The mechanisms behind the intersection of gender and racial structures are a complex interplay of economic, social and institutional factors, which act on nested global, national and translocal scales.

  • 10.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Entwined ruralities: seasonality, simultaneity and precarity among transnational migrant workers in the wild berry industry2021In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 88, p. 510-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agrarian industries in rural areas are increasingly relying on seasonal migrant workers, who arrive in transnationally organised settings. This paper focuses on the concept of transnational simultaneity in order to further analyse the dynamics that are sustaining low-wage, seasonal labour migration in transnational social fields. It is suggested that the concepts of seasonal livelihood diversification and biographical simultaneity contribute to explain this process, which is highlighted in relation to the empirical case of Thai wild berry pickers in Sweden. The ability of the workers to co-arrange life in the homeland with work overseas, together with a firmly institutionalised, transnational social network, lay the ground for the Thai-Swedish migration process. It is characterised by high circularity and frequency among the migrant workers, who oscillate on a seasonal basis between multi-sited work places, despite relatively low economic return. It is argued that simultaneity within the transnational social field, which is embedded in seasonal livelihood diversification and prospects of improved futures for their children, lowers the threshold for accepting exploitative work conditions, thus paving the way for precarious migrant work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    ‘Grapes of wrath’?: Power spatialities and aspects of labour in the wild berry global commodity chain2013In: Competition & change, ISSN 1024-5294, E-ISSN 1477-2221, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite their central position, workers' relationships have often been a neglected issue in commodity chain approaches. This article analyses how the social relations of workers are affected by economic upgrading in the wild berry global commodity chain (GCC). It is argued that the social effects in a GCC are the result of multiple power spatialities, which must be analysed both according to workers' rights and from a household perspective. In the Swedish wild berry GCC, foreign workers are contracted on a seasonal basis to collect the raw material. The regulated workers, who are principally from Thailand, are subject to social upgrading as well as social downgrading, involving the potential for both exploitation in the Swedish labour market and social empowerment in their homeland. It is concluded that a complex mix of hierarchical, networked and topological power spatialities explain the construction of the wild berry GCC and its effects on worker relations.

  • 12.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Precarity and migration: Thai wild berry pickers in Sweden2022In: Faces of precarity: critical perspectives on work, subjectivities and struggles / [ed] Joseph Choonara; Annalisa Murgia; Renato Miguel Carmo, Bristol University Press , 2022, p. 180-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyzes the precarity of migrant workers. International migrants tend to be precarious due to the unequal distribution of resources along lines of ethnicity, race and citizenship. The chapter analyzes the complex relationship between structure and agency in precarious migration processes of global food chains. The example of Thai wild berry pickers in Sweden shows how migrant work is sustained through an interplay of, on the one hand, structures of neoliberal and global divisions of labour and, on the other hand, migrant aspirations for a better life. Specifically, the COVID-19 pandemic illustrates how migrant workers, as actors in global neoliberal food systems, are taking both economic and health-related risks while working abroad. Indirectly, migrant agency is sustaining a system of precarious work.

  • 13. Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Axelsson, Linn
    Abella, Manolo
    Thai berry pickers in Sweden: A migration corridor to a low-wage sector2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year, around 5000 berry pickers travel from Thailand to Sweden to pick wild berries. This report describes the system and regulatory framework that surrounds the berry pickers, and analyses their costs and earnings. The report has a comparative approach, and compares the Thai berry pickers with other types of international labour migration and with their alternative earnings in Thailand. It also describes the workers demographic background and their use of the earnings from berry picking. The report is uniquely based on 165 standardized interviews with Thai berry pickers, which were performed in Thailand on behalf of this study. The main conclusion is that the costs surrounding berry picking are relatively high, as seen against the background of the short berry picking season and the time that the workers are spending in Sweden. On average, a berry picker pays around 4000 USD to work in Sweden for a period of 70 days. This means that, for the average worker, it takes 1,6 months to earn enough money to cover these costs, and thereafter remains only a limited time window to earn enough money to bring back to Thailand. Around 50 percent of the costs incurred are paid to Thai staffing agencies, and the other half is paid to Swedish berry companies as a daily fee for accommodation, food and access to a car. After the deduction of all costs, the average berry picker returns to Thailand with around 2000 USD from one season in Sweden. This figure is roughly three times that of what the average worker would normally earn in Thailand during the same amount of time. The worker with the highest net earnings from berry picking in Sweden, however, could make as much as 12 times more than what he or she would make in Thailand. The report also shows that the berry pickers, who often are men working as farmers in north-eastern Thailand where they also have their families, are travelling to Sweden repeatedly. A majority of the workers in the study had travelled to Sweden seven times or more, whereas the most frequent worker had travelled as much as 26 times. According to the study, there is no positive relationship between the frequency of work in Sweden and the size of vi the earnings. The earnings from berry picking are being used for daily consumption and investments in farming, housing and children’s’ education. In the report we discuss the motives behind the perpetuation of the migration system despite the relatively high costs. One explanation could be that the workers are being paid on a piece rate, meaning that they are aspiring, and believing that they can achieve, the same high earnings as the most successful workers. However, the payment system also implies that the workers are at high risk, since almost 50 percent note that they have earned less than the guaranteed wage that they are entitled to according to Swedish collective agreements. Another reason why berry pickers travel to Sweden repeatedly could be that it’s associated with relatively low social costs. The berry season in Sweden occurs at a suitable time in the Thai growing season, and the berry pickers are spending a relatively short time away from their families. The system surrounding berry picking can be seen both as it’s solution and it’s problem. On the one hand, Thai staffing agencies and Swedish berry companies are providing the infrastructure that sustains the system across time, thus enabling the workers to invest in their children’s futures, etc. On the other hand, the report shows a lack of transparency in relation to the costs, which might be excessive, while the costs and risks are put on the individual worker. The practice of using staffing agencies has been enacted as a way to avoid taxes and social responsibility in Sweden. As an alternative, it is possible that experienced berry pickers could use their own social networks to travel to Sweden, while starting up a cooperative and in that way, reduce the costs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Böhlin, Marie
    Den nya gröna vågen och praktiska flyttare: En intervjustudie om inflyttare till Kramfors kommun 2020–20212023Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Repopulation of the Swedish countryside: globalisation by international migration2014In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 34, p. 128-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural areas have often been treated as mono-ethnic and homogeneous areas, as compared to urban areas that are seen as dynamic and mobile areas. Recent discourses in rural studies have been questioning this idea, adding the perspectives that rural areas are constituted by mobilities, actively engaged in globalization processes, and characterized by ethnic diversity. As population decline is a constant threat to many rural areas, international migration flows can contribute to their repopulation and to a dynamic and transnational countryside. The present paper takes a quantitative perspective, thereby adding to the mostly qualitative studies in this field. Through the use of Swedish full-population register data, patterns of international migrants in rural areas are depicted, using a unique definition of rurality. Our study shows that international migration to the countryside reveals a rich diversity in ethnicity and age. Nordic and European middle-aged and elderly migrants have the highest odds of living in the countryside, while South East Asian women are an upcoming group. Migrants in the countryside are more often women, have a Swedish partner, have less education, live in border areas and are short stayers. Female migrants in rural areas also have a higher employment rate than their urban counterparts. The results suggest a variety of migration motives, ranging from quality of life to cross-border and marriage migration, which indicate increased globalization of the countryside.

  • 16.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Hermelin, Brita
    Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier, Linköpings universitet.
    Westermark, Kristina
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Transnational spaces "from above": the role of Institutions in promoting highly skilled labour migration from India to Sweden2014In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 105, no 5, p. 511-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global network economy involves intensive interactions and flows between places. In this paper, we define a theoretical framework of labour migration in the global economy in which we propose the importance of transnational spaces 'from above' and how formal organisations develop networks for migration processes. This theoretical framework is employed on an empirical study that investigates the increasing flows of highly-skilled labour migration from India to Sweden within the ICT-sector. The paper illustrates how transformations and acting in formal institutions in the political and private sectors have a strong impact on the transnational migration of highly-skilled labour. By integrating theories from migration studies, institutional theory and economic geography the theoretical framework has been able to conceptualise factors that are less visible in migration studies 'from below'. Thereby this paper contributes to a more multi-sided understanding of transnational migration processes.

  • 17.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Olofsson, Irma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Negotiating the Wild West: Variegated neoliberalisation of the Swedish labour migration regime and the wild berry migration industry2022In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neoliberalisation processes have long permeated Western societies, including a common direction towards neoliberal migration regimes. This paper combines the perspective of variegated neoliberalisation with the recent literature on migration industries, to investigate the neoliberalisation of the Swedish labour migration regime and how it affected and interacted with the wild berry migration industry. It shows how neoliberalisation as a historical and spatially contingent process resulted in the distinct phases of intertwined policymaking and enactment of the industry. The ‘roll back’ phase included mutual interests and ‘intimate relations’ between state and industry, which both empowered and increased the number of private actors, creating structures that remained during the regular restructuring phase of ‘roll out’ neoliberalisation. While adding the perspective of variegated neoliberalisation, the paper deepens the analysis of migration industries by pointing at neoliberalisation as a spatial and temporal process, where the interplay between state and industry, an enlarged number of intermediaries and the increased responsibility of private actors are central cornerstones. The Swedish case shows how the role of intermediaries in the wild berry migration industry was reconstructed in order for the neoliberal migration regime to regulate a previously irregular migration industry. It is concluded that strong but spatially contingent links exist between neoliberal political economies, migration regimes and migration industries.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Nordregio, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Disadvantage, Ethnic Niching or Pursuit of a Vision?: Motives of Immigrant Women Care Entrepreneurs in the Ageing Swedish Society2012In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 423-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As immigrant groups grow older, host societies are faced with new challenges of integration. In a labor market that is structured by ethnicity and gender, the demand for culturally competent care provides immigrant women with the opportunity to become entrepreneurs within the care sector. This article analyzes 20 in-depth interviews with immigrant women from 13 countries who are entrepreneurs in home-help services for elderly people. The article analyzes the complex motives behind the women’s entrepreneurship. Ethnic entrepreneurship has mainly been approached as a way for immigrants to survive in the labor market—the disadvantage theory—or as a means to create job opportunities for co-ethnics within ethnic economies. Opposed to this, three main motives appear in the analysis: first, the processes of ethnic and gender sorting in the care sector; second, ethnic strategies in the labor market; and third, the wish to gain independence and improve the quality of care. Only in a few cases is ethnic entrepreneurship practiced within ethnic economies; instead, it is mainly found within cross-cultural economies, consisting of employees and customers of mixed origin who are embedded in a majority society. The women construct their ethnic identities to compete in the segmented Swedish labor market by creating ethnic identities of care that are adjusted to meet the needs of their customers in a cross-cultural society.

  • 19.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Tammaru, Tiit
    University of Tartu.
    ´Neighbourhood effects´ and ´City effects´: the entry of newly arrived immigrants into the labour market2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1165-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important debate in current research and policy focuses on the role of urban residential segregation on the social mobility of immigrants. Much focus has been on ‘neighbourhood effects’ and on how spatial variations within the city affect individual careers. This paper adds the analysis of variations of labour market incorporation between cities. The labour market careers of one migrant cohort to Sweden are analysed, where the analysis of ‘neighbourhood effects’ and ‘city effects’ are studied jointly, using a longitudinal database and discrete-time event history analysis. The results show that labour market participation increases slowly over time and there are large variations due to migrant origin, gender and education. Both ‘neighbourhood effects’ and ‘city effects’ were significant, but whereas the former decreased over time, the ‘city effect’ was robust. Accordingly, contextual aspects of the individual city need to be included in the analysis of neighbourhood effects.

  • 20.
    Kuns, Brian
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fischer, Klara
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Olofsson, Irma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Ovaska, Ulla
    Bioeconomy and Environment Unit, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Helsinki Finland, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Helsinki, Finland.
    Refslund, Bjarke
    Department of Sociology and Social Work, Aalborg University, Aalborg Ø, Denmark.
    Fredrik Rye, Johan
    Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll, Norway.
    Vihinen, Hilkka
    Bioeconomy and Environment Unit, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Helsinki Finland, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Helsinki, Finland.
    From panic to business as usual: what coronavirus has revealed about migrant labour, agri-food systems and industrial relations in the Nordic countries2023In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 907-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on migrant labour in Nordic agriculture, wild berry picking and food processing. The starting point is the fear of a food crisis at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic (2020) because of the absence of migrant workers. The question was raised early in the pandemic if food systems in the Global North are vulnerable due to dependence on precarious migrant workers. In the light of this question, we assess the reactions of farmers and different actors in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to what looked like an unfolding food crisis. In many ways, the reactions in the Nordic countries were similar to each other, and to broader reactions in the Global North, and we follow these reactions as they relate to migrant workers from an initial panic to a return to business as usual despite the continuation of the pandemic. In the end, 2020 proved to be an excellent year for Nordic food production in part because migrant workers were able to come. We discuss reasons why the Nordic countries did not face disruptions during the pandemic, map out patterns of labour precarity and segmentation for migrant labour in agriculture and food production in the Nordic countries and propose questions for further research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Nuga, Mari
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Downshifting towards voluntary simplicity: the process of reappraising the local2023In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reappraisal of the local and living a rooted life are often highlighted by international advocates for sustainable and environmentally conscious lifestyles. The purpose of this study is to explore and theorize downshifters’ lifestyle changes, with a particular focus on their living environments and sense of place, and we draw on a theoretical framework that combines insights from previous research on downshifting and voluntary simplicity. We conducted 30 life story interviews with individuals in Sweden who consider themselves downshifters or advocates of a simpler life. These materials were analysed along the dimensions of (1) spatial adaptation and appropriation; (2) local and global scales; and (3) temporality of place. Our results emphasize the non-linearity of lifestyle changes towards simplicity where, whereby commitment to sustainability varies while personal goals rely on the previous experiences and everyday practices, values and knowledge that can improve both individual and global sustainability. Our analysis shows that sense of place is a dynamic process influenced by mobilities and flows, spatial inertia and context, and memories and emotions. Our research contributes to the recent more than- relational view on space and place with concepts from humanistic geography that further assist in understanding individuals’ sense of place.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Olofsson, Irma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Tollefsen, Aina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    'A strong mind and a solid physique': symbolic constructions of migrant workers in Sweden's green industries2023In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how employer federations, trade unions and the Swedish state symbolically construct seasonal migrant workers to work in the green industries, specifically in agriculture, forestry and wild-berry picking. Work tasks and skills become ethnicised where certain groups are constructed as ‘fit’ for certain work tasks. Through symbolic constructing, boundaries are drawn in relation to Swedish workers in general but also hierarchically within the group of seasonal migrant workers and in relation to specific groups in Sweden, typically un-employed youth and newly settled refugees. This paper is based on interviews with unions and employer organisations as well as secondary text-sources and legal texts. The analysis shows that while employers construct seasonal migrant workers as vital for agriculture, forestry and wild-berry picking, arguing that their line of business could not be sustained without them, the union side portrays this as an ‘artificial demand’. Within a system that to a large degree is based on employers’ demand for inexpensive and flexible labour, symbolic boundaries of seasonal migrant workers are not only performed by the employers’ side, but are also co-constructed with and sanctioned by the state; while partly contested by the unions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University.
    Moving out of ‘their places’?: Immigrant women care entrepreneurs in Sweden.2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 345-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyse immigrant women’s entrepreneurship in the care sector in Sweden. Twenty in-depth interviews with care entrepreneurs in the Stockholm region are analysed regarding the motives and entrepreneurial processes, against the background of the gender and ‘racially’ divided labour market. We conclude that the interviewed women are motivated by complex reasons, like a wish to create better care and better conditions for their personnel. In an act of transformation they turn negative reactions into actions and become entrepreneurs in order to make space for better care, at the margin of a subordinated sector of the economy. We conclude that they cross gendered and racialised lines in their identification as entrepreneurs, even though they are not seen as entrepreneurs by others. We find no evidence for the women being motivated to become entrepreneurs in order to escape unemployment.

  • 24.
    Tollefsen, Aina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Axelsson, Linn
    Stockholm University.
    Changing labor standards and ‘subordinated inclusion’: Thai migrant workers in the Swedish forest berry industry2020In: International Labour Migration to Europe’s Rural Regions / [ed] Johan Fredrik Rye, Karen O’Reilly, London: Routledge, 2020, p. 121-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The forest berry industry in northern Sweden operates within a competitive global market for nutritious wild berries and is dependent on seasonal migrant workers. This chapter analyses actual wage levels of these workers after a series of new regulations surrounding migration and labour standards. Labour standards improved in Sweden in 2010 with the implementation of collective agreements and work contracts for non-European Economic Area berry pickers, the only country employing such standards within this type of industry. We discuss how, despite these improvements, Thai migrant berry pickers continue to be exploited in a process that we theorise as subordinated inclusion. The chapter is based on unique survey material with berry pickers and in-depth interviews with migrant workers during the berry season in Sweden and off-season in Thailand. We focus on actual wages, while also placing our analysis in the context of the industry’s peripherality and changing geographies of production and consumption. One third of the workers in the survey reported earnings below the income they are entitled to according to the work contracts. Despite deploying varying forms of resistance and the recent regulation of labour standards for migrant labour, we conclude that the fulfilment of their formal rights is still lacking.The forest berry industry in northern Sweden operates within a competitive global market for nutritious wild berries and is dependent on seasonal migrant workers. This chapter analyses actual wage levels of these workers after a series of new regulations surrounding migration and labour standards. It focuses on unique survey material with berry pickers and in-depth interviews with migrant workers during the berry season in Sweden and off-season in Thailand. The changes in the globalising labour markets and the varying forms of conditions and access to rights granted to different groups of migrant workers in relation to national systems provide examples of severe employment inequalities worldwide. Work in rural economic sectors such as agriculture, forestry, or industries of non-timber forest products links increasingly to global value chains and their institutional, ideological, and economic dynamics. The analysis of the survey shows that the earnings for Thai berry pickers many times were considerably lower than the collective agreement had stipulated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    van Eerbeek, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Chameleon brokers: A translocal take on migration industries in the Thai-Swedish wild berry business2021In: Migration Studies, ISSN 2049-5838, E-ISSN 2049-5846, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 830-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrant brokers constitute a substantial node in the industries that underpin contemporary global migration processes, including seasonal labour migrants in agri-food businesses. This article adds a translocal perspective to the role of migrant brokers, while emphasising the multi-sited embeddedness of brokers in sending and receiving countries, and their role in sustaining transnational migration flows. The example of the Swedish wild berry industry shows how two groups of translocal brokers operate in multi-sited space, first, Thai women brokers residing in rural Sweden, and second, local brokers, residing in rural Thailand. This article emphasises how translocal brokers are giving migration industries access to multi-sited embeddedness, both at the site of recruitment in Thai villages and at the site of work in Sweden. The translocal embeddedness is noticed in how moral economies and trust are at play in recruitment processes, and how moral economies are then transferred across space to the site of work. Also, it accentuates how translocal brokers are main subjects, in how their biographical histories are creating translocal relations across space. Lastly, we show how spatial divisions of labour are creating social hierarchies among workers, where the brokers themselves incorporate shifting, ‘chameleon’ roles in multi-sited space. The analysis brings the moral complexity of brokers to the surface, while showing how the social relations of their ‘moral economies’ are commodified within profit-seeking migration industries. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf