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  • 1.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Design oriented-research versus Research-oriented Design2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designforskningens tre fält2007In: Under Ytan - Om Designforskning / [ed] Ilstedt Hjelm, S., Stockhiolm: Raster förlag, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Integrating User Experience into the Design Process with the Repertory Grid Technique: Some Preliminary Notes2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sustainability and the Good Life2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Pragmatics of Design Studio Culture: Our Story2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fallman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    xProbes at Work: Using In-situ Experience Prototyping as Probes in Projecting and Discussing Possible Futures2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Fallman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dealing with User Experience and Affective Evaluation in HCI Design: A Repertory Grid Approach2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A different way of seeing: Albert Borgmann's philosophy of technology and human-computer interaction2009In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional human–computer interaction (HCI) allowed researchers and practitioners to share and rely on the ‘five E’s’ of usability, the principle that interactive systems should be designed to be effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. A recent trend in HCI, however, is that academic researchers as well as practitioners are becoming increasingly interested in user experiences, i.e., understanding and designing for relationships between users and artifacts that are for instance affective, engaging, fun, playable, sociable, creative, involving, meaningful, exciting, ambiguous, and curious. In this paper, it is argued that built into this shift in perspective there is a concurrent shift in accountability that is drawing attention to a number of ethical, moral, social, cultural, and political issues that have been traditionally de-emphasized in a field of research guided by usability concerns. Not surprisingly, this shift in accountability has also received scarce attention in HCI. To be able to find any answers to the question of what makes a good user experience, the field of HCI needs to develop a philosophy of technology. One building block for such a philosophy of technology in HCI is presented. Albert Borgmann argues that we need to be cautious and rethink the relationship as well as the often-assumed correspondence between what we consider useful and what we think of as good in technology. This junction—that some technologies may be both useful and good, while some technologies that are useful for some purposes might also be harmful, less good, in a broader context—is at the heart of Borgmann’s understanding of technology. Borgmann’s notion of the device paradigm is a valuable contribution to HCI as it points out that we are increasingly experiencing the world with, through, and by information technologies and that most of these technologies tend to be designed to provide commodities that effortlessly grant our wishes without demanding anything in return, such as patience, skills, or effort. This paper argues that Borgmann’s work is relevant and makes a valuable contribution to HCI in at least two ways: first, as a different way of seeing that raises important social, cultural, ethical, and moral issues from which contemporary HCI cannot escape; and second, as providing guidance as to how specific values might be incorporated into the design of interactive systems that foster engagement with reality.

  • 9.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    An Interface with Weight: Taking Interaction by Tilt beyond Disembodied Metaphors2002In: Mobile Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction, Pisa, Italy, September 18-20, Springer , 2002, p. 291-295Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Catching the Interactive Experience: Using the Repertory Grid Technique for Qualitative and Quantitative Insight into User Experience2006In: Proceedings of Engage: Interaction, Art, and Audience Experience, November 26-28, 2006, University of Technology, Sydney, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designforskningens tre fält2007In: Under Ytan - Om Designforskning, Stockholm: Raster Förlag , 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Design-oriented Human-Computer Interaction2003In: Proceedings of CHI 2003: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI Letters, Vol. 5, Issue No. 1, New york: ACM Press , 2003, p. 225-232Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Desktop Computing as Paradigm: Hidden Assumptions that Suppress Mobile Information Technology2010In: International Journal of Computing & Information Technology (IJCIT), ISSN 0974-696X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 33-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, it is argued that what we think of as information technology in support ofmobility is related to and draws on traditional ideas of desktop computing in a multitudeof ways. A key argument made is that these dependencies are not only beneficial anddesirable-in terms of user familiarity, recognition, acceptance, and a supposedly steeperlearning curve-but also carry with them restrictions and hidden assumptions that indifferent ways come to suppress mobility. Through an analysis inspired byphenomenological inquiry, this paper sets out to recognize some of the interactionalassumptions and dependencies that mobile information technology holds in relation tothe desktop computer, and which currently suppress mobility.

  • 14.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Embodied Systems: Introducing General-purpose Wearable Computers1999In: Proceedings of the 22nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS22: Enterprise Architectures for Virtual Organizations (Keuruu, Finland, August 7-10, 1999), 1999, p. 305-318Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Enabling Physical Collaboration in Industrial Settings by Designing for Embodied Interaction2003In: Proceedings of the Latin American Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 17-20, New York: ACM Press , 2003, p. 41-51Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From Freedom to Involvement: On the Rhetoric of Mobility in HCI Research2005In: Proceedings of HICSS-38: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, January 3-5, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Big Island, Hawaii, IEEE , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mediated reality through glasses or binoculars? Exploring use models of wearable computing in the context of aircraft maintenance.2003In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 265-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aircraft maintenance is often considered a typical application for specialized wearable computer systems, designed and used for a specific purpose only. From the findings of an interpretive case study conducted at Scandinavian Airlines Systems, the largest commercial airline in Scandinavia, there is evidence to question the potential usefulness of such a system.

    Instead, in this article, aircraft maintenance is used to explore the potentialities of different use models of wearable computing (i.e., the way the system is designed, used, and understood, and which should also make sense in other environments). The use models are (a) a vertical model addressed by a binoculars-analogy, where the system is designed and used for a specific purpose; and (b) a horizontal model, approached by perceiving wearable computers as eyeglasses, where the system is used throughout the day for a number of activities. Problems with both models suggest an alternative use model, which is presented as the embodied use model, drawing on the notion of embodiment introduced by Ihde (1990).

  • 18.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobility as involvement: On the role of involvement in the design of mobile support systems for industrial application2009In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the concept of mobility is examined theoretically, from a phenomenological perspective, as well as empirically, through two design case studies. First, a background to how the notion of mobility is generally conceptualized and used in academia as well as within industry is provided. From a phenomenological analysis, it becomes necessary to question the currently dominating understanding of mobility as first and foremost a provider of freedom from a number of constraints. Rather, it is argued, mobility needs to be understood primarily as quite the opposite; as being about getting involved in different contexts. Based on this analysis, it is described how such an altered way of understanding mobility has come to challenge our design team’s preconceptions of mobile interaction design and influence the design of two mobile support system for service and maintenance in industrial settings.

  • 19.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Persuade Into What? Why Human-Computer Interaction Needs a Philosophy of Technology2007In: Proceedings of Persuasive 2007: Second International Conference on Persuasive Technology, April 26-27, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, Springer , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The BubbleFish: Digital Documents Available On Hand2001In: Proceedings of INTERACT'01: Eight IFIP TC.13 Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (Waseda University Conference Centre, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, July 9-13, Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The interaction design research triangle of design practice, design exploration, and design studies2008In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 4-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    The New Good: Exploring the Potential of Philosophy of Technology to Contribute to Human-Computer Interaction2011In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2011, p. 1051-1060Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of the increased interest in issues such as engagement, affection, and meaning, contemporary human- computer interaction (HCI) has increasingly come to examine the nature of interactions between artifacts, humans, and environments through concepts such as user experience and meaning. In the transition from usability metrics to user experience, what appears lacking is a more explicit characterization of what it is HCI now strives for as a discipline—i.e. what constitutes a ‘good’ user experience? Through a detailed look at two contemporary philosophies of technology—Albert Borgmann’s notion of the device paradigm and Don Ihde’s non-neutrality of technology- mediated experience—this paper seeks to explore the potential of the philosophy of technology to contribute new insights and provide well-grounded conceptual tools for coming to terms with what may become HCI’s ‘new good’. 

  • 23.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Penguin: Using the Web as a Database for Descriptive and Dynamic Grammar and Spell Checking2002In: Proceedings of CHI 2002: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, Minneapolis, MN, April 20-25, New york: ACM Press , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Towards New Goods: Philosophy of Technology Meets Human-Computer Interaction2010In: Proceedings of The 35th Annual Meeting of The Society for Social Studies of Science 4S (August, Komaba Campus, University of Tokyo: Japan)., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wear, Point, and Tilt: Designing Support for Mobile Service and Maintenance in Industrial Settings2002In: Proceedings of DIS2002: Designing Interactive Systems, London, UK, June 25-28, New York: ACM Press , 2002, p. 239-302Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    'Where's the Interface?': Enhanced Use Models for Mobile Interaction2001In: Proceedings of INTERACT'01, Eight IFIP TC.13 Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (Waseda University Conference Centre, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, July 9-13), Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Press, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an overview of my dissertation work, which addresses challenges involved in designing use models, interfaces and interaction styles for mobile technology that go beyond notions and metaphors found in desktop computing. A model of attention and a model of use are presented to explain distinctive requirements of mobile technology. Prototypes are being developed in collaboration with ABB, Scandinavian Airlines System and The Interactive Institute to demonstrate three different use models, where the embodied use model—which blends the gap between the virtual and the physical—is of particular interest.

  • 27.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Why Research-oriented Design Isn't Design-oriented Research2005In: Proceedings of Nordes: Nordic Design Research Conference, May 29-31, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Come Together, Right Now, Over Me: Conceptual and Tangible Design of Pleasurable Dupliances for Children2001In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Affective Human Factors Design, CAHD 2001, London: Asean Academic Press , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Dupliances: Physical and Virtual Activity Encompassed2001In: Proceedings of CHI 2001: Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, New york: ACM Press , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Backman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, High Performance Computing Center North (HPC2N). Centrum för utbildningsteknik.
    Holmlund, Kenneth
    Umeå University. Centrum för utbildningsteknik.
    VR in Education: An Introduction to Multisensory Constructivist Learning Environments1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bogren, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Henje, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Attract, inform, and interact: Working with product semantics in an inclusive design project2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bogren, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Henje, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    User-centered inclusive design: Making public transport accessible2009In: Include 2009, International Conference on Inclusive Design, Royal College of Art, London, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a commissioned, user-centered inclusive design case study where an exceptionally heterogeneous group of users have been involved in all phases. With the overall aim of seeking to make public transport more accessible, this project has specifically focused on information issues relating to train stations. The objective has been to design and implement a fully functional prototype of an information terminal that can provide accessible information to as wide a group of users as possible. To fulfill this goal, we have taken a user-centered path, working with two groups of users. First, a heterogeneous group of users took active part in the early phases of the project, allowing us to quickly assess new design ideas and mock-up prototypes; provide entirely new design ideas in a participatory manner; as well as help us abandon some of our own preconceptions. A second, similarly heterogeneous user group, more formally tested and evaluated a finalized prototype of the system in situ at a real train station, in real time, and using real train information. Following the results of this evaluation, we have proposed a number of improvements to the system.

  • 33.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fjellström, Oskar
    Bogren, Linda
    Lindbergh, Kent
    Nilbrink, Fredrik
    An RFID-based Point and Listen Interface Providing Library Access for the Visually Impaired2007In: HCI International: 12th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Beijing, China, July 22-27, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fjellström, Oskar
    Lindbergh, Kent
    AudioIndex: Library Access for the Visually Challenged Using an RFID-based Point and Listen Interface2006In: Proceedings of UbiComp 2006: The Eight International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, September 17-21, Orange County, CA, New York: ACM Press , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Rigor and Relevance Remodeled2002In: Proceedings of IRIS25: Information Systems Research in Scandinavia, Bautahoj, Denmark, August 10-13, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Holmström, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    IT Support for Flight Technicians: An Exploratory Study2000In: Proceedings of the 23nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS23, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an interpretive case study conducted at three different airports in Sweden and Norway during 1999. The focus of the study has been to establish an understanding of the work practice of flight technicians and the use of IT support tools for aircraft maintenance. By use of observations, interviews and document reviews, we found three main issues. First, there is a gap between the education of flight technicians and their production work. Second, flight maintenance is time critical, which makes on-site educational efforts difficult. Third, the diversity of computer systems used by flight technicians hinder efficient and productive maintenance, as well as restrain a recent trend towards mobility of IT support tools.

  • 37.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jalkanen, Kalle
    Lörstad, Henrik
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Westling, Jonas
    The Reality Helmet: A Wearable Interactive Experience2003In: Proceedings of Siggraph 2003: Sketches & Applications, San Diego, CA, July 27-31, New York: ACM Press , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Kruzeniski, Mike
    Andersson, Mattias
    Designing for a Collaborative Industrial Environment: The Case of the ABB Powerwall2005In: Proceedings of DUX 2005: Conference on Designing for User Experience, San Francisco, CA, November 3-5, New York: ACM Press , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lindbergh, Kent
    Inclusive Design by Taking Special Measures: Making Libraries Accessible for All2007In: Proceedings of Include 2007: International Conference on Inclusive Design, Royal College of Art, London, UK, 2-4 April, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Inside-Out Interaction: An Interaction Technique for Dealing with Large Interface Surfaces such as Web Pages on Small Screen Displays2004In: International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques: ACM SIGGRAPH 2004 Sketches, 2004, p. 106-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics. Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    ScrollPad: Tangible Scrolling with Mobile Devices2004In: Proceedings of the 37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS'04), 2004, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we approach the problem of managing large visual sets of data on small mobile devices. While current approaches either focuses on 1) scrolling on the mobile device, or 2) reducing the content in various ways (e.g. zooming, automatic redesign depending on the screen size of a mobile device, etc) our approach is to scroll with the mobile device itself (i.e. object in the world scrolling) over a large virtual area. We present the background for this project and working prototype called Scrollpad developed to illustrate this concept. We then present an initial user study conducted and relate this project to similar efforts made before concluding the paper.

  • 42.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Sketching with Stop Motion Animation2011Other (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Regan, Alistar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Stott, Mike
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Design Brief, Special Section on Interface Design2002In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. IX, no 2Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University at Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
    Establishing Criteria of Rigor and Relevance in Interaction Design Research2010In: Proceedings of Create 10: The Interaction Design Conference (June-July, Napier University: Edinburgh, UK)., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has rapidly evolved into a unique discipline embracing practicing professionals, design educators, and academic researchers. As with many evolving disciplines, attracting attention from a large number of people with different backgrounds, interests, and ways of seeing tends to cause ‘disciplinary anxiety’, which inevitably leads to the question of what constitutes ‘good research’. What is rigorous and relevant interaction design research? How do we recognize and evaluate it? In this paper, we argue that most current attempts at dealing with issues of rigor and relevance in interaction design research tend to be on loan from other disciplines, and tend to overlook, conceal, or knowingly exclude some of what makes interaction design research such a unique field. Our primary contribution is that what may be perceived as three different design research activities—design practice, design exploration, and design studies—have their own purposes, intended outcomes, and internal logic. Each form of research must thus be examined in its own right and the notions of rigor and relevance for each of them have to be based on a firm understanding of the particular purpose of each approach. We would argue that this is not done consistently in the field today, which leads to misunderstandings, confusion, and mistakes when interaction design research is reviewed, discussed, and assessed.

  • 45.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University.
    Establishing criteria of rigour and relevance in interaction design research2010In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research is a unique discipline embracing practicing professionals, design educators and academic researchers, but attracting attention from people with different backgrounds and interests has lead to the question of what constitutes ‘good research’. What is rigorous and relevant interaction design research and how do we recognise and evaluate it? Most current attempts at dealing with these issues tend to be on loan from other disciplines, and may overlook, conceal, or knowingly exclude some of what makes interaction design research such a unique field. Our primary contribution is that what may be perceived as three different design research activities—design practice, design exploration and design studies—have their own purposes, intended outcomes, and internal logic. Each approach must be examined in its own right and the notions of rigour and relevance have to be based on a firm understanding of the particular purpose of each approach

  • 46.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Waterworth, J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Dealing with User Experience and Affective Evaluation in HCI Design: A Repertory Grid Approach2005In: CHI 2005: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Capturing user experiences of mobile information technology with the repertory grid technique2010In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 250-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the application of the repertory grid technique (RGT) as a tool for capturing the user experience of technological artifacts. In noting the artificiality of assessing the emotional impact of interactive artifacts in isolation from cognitive judgments, we argue that HCI techniques must provide practical solutions regarding how to assess the holistic meaning of users’ interactive experiences. RGT is a candidate for this role. This paper takes the reader step by step through setting up, conducting, and analyzing a RGT study. RGT is a technique on the border between qualitative and quantitative research, unique in that it respects the wholeness of cognition and does not separate the intellectual from the emotional aspects of the user experience. Compared to existing methods in HCI, RGT has the advantage of treating experiences holistically, while also providing a degree of quantitative precision and generalizability in their capture.

  • 48.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Yttergren, Björn
    Meeting in Quiet: Choosing Suitable Notification Modalities for Mobile Phones2005In: Proceedings of DUX 2005: Conference on Designing for User Experience, San Francisco, CA, November 3-5, New York: ACM Press , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
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    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Yttergren, Björn
    The Design of a Computer Mouse Providing Three Degrees of Freedom2007In: Proceedings of HCI International: 12th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Beijing, China, July 22-27, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
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    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
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