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  • 1.
    Bergenheim, Tommy A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Larsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia: long-term follow-up2015In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 86, no 12, p. 1307-1313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: 61 procedures with selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia were retrospectively analysed concerning surgical results, pain, quality of life (QoL) and recurrences.

    METHODS: The patients were assessed with the Tsui torticollis scale, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain and Fugl-Meyer scale for QoL. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, early postoperatively, at 6 months, then at a mean of 42 (13-165) months. All patients underwent electromyogram at baseline, which was repeated in cases who presented with recurrence of symptoms after surgery.

    RESULTS: Six months of follow-up was available for 55 (90%) of the procedures and late follow-up for 34 (56%). The mean score of the Tsui scale was 10 preoperatively. It improved to 4.5 (p<0.001) at 6 months, and 5.3 (p<0.001) at late follow-up. VAS for pain improved from 6.5 preoperatively to 4.2 (p<0.001) at 6 months and 4 (p<0.01) at late follow-up. The Fugl-Meyer score for QoL improved from 43.3 to 46.6 (p<0.05) at 6 months, and to 51.1 (p<0.05) at late follow-up. Major reinnervation and/or change in the dystonic pattern occurred following 29% of the procedures, and led in 26% of patients to reoperation with either additional denervation or pallidal stimulation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Selective peripheral denervation remains a surgical option in the treatment of cervical dystonia when conservative measures fail. Although the majority of patients experience a significant relief of symptoms, there is a substantial risk of reinnervation and/or change in the pattern of the cervical dystonia.

  • 2. Berk, John L.
    et al.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Obici, Laura
    Sekijima, Yoshiki
    Zeldenrust, Steven R.
    Yamashita, Taro
    Heneghan, Michael A.
    Gorevic, Peter D.
    Litchy, William J.
    Wiesman, Janice F.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Corato, Manuel
    Lozza, Alessandro
    Cortese, Andrea
    Robinson-Papp, Jessica
    Colton, Theodore
    Rybin, Denis V.
    Bisbee, Alice B.
    Ando, Yukio
    Ikeda, Shu-ichi
    Seldin, David C.
    Merlini, Giampaolo
    Skinner, Martha
    Kelly, Jeffery W.
    Dyck, Peter J.
    Repurposing Diflunisal for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial2013In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 310, no 24, p. 2658-2667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Familial amyloid polyneuropathy, a lethal genetic disease caused by aggregation of variant transthyretin, induces progressive peripheral nerve deficits and disability. Diflunisal, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, stabilizes transthyretin tetramers and prevents amyloid fibril formation in vitro. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of diflunisal on polyneuropathy progression in patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS International randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study conducted among 130 patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy exhibiting clinically detectable peripheral or autonomic neuropathy at amyloid centers in Sweden (Umea), Italy (Pavia), Japan (Matsumoto and Kumamoto), England (London), and the United States (Boston, Massachusetts; New York, New York; and Rochester, Minnesota) from 2006 through 2012. INTERVENTION Participants were randomly assigned to receive diflunisal, 250 mg (n=64), or placebo (n=66) twice daily for 2 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point, the difference in polyneuropathy progression between treatments, was measured by the Neuropathy Impairment Score plus 7 nerve tests (NIS+7) which ranges from 0 (no neurological deficits) to 270 points (no detectable peripheral nerve function). Secondary outcomes included a quality-of-life questionnaire (36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]) and modified body mass index. Because of attrition, we used likelihood-based modeling and multiple imputation analysis of baseline to 2-year data. RESULTS By multiple imputation, the NIS+7 score increased by 25.0 (95% CI, 18.4-31.6) points in the placebo group and by 8.7 (95% CI, 3.3-14.1) points in the diflunisal group, a difference of 16.3 points (95% CI, 8.1-24.5 points; P < .001). Mean SF-36 physical scores decreased by 4.9 (95% CI, -7.6 to -2.2) points in the placebo group and increased by 1.5 (95% CI, -0.8 to 3.7) points in the diflunisal group (P < .001). Mean SF-36 mental scores declined by 1.1 (95% CI, -4.3 to 2.0) points in the placebo group while increasing by 3.7 (95% CI, 1.0-6.4) points in the diflunisal group (P = .02). By responder analysis, 29.7% of the diflunisal group and 9.4% of the placebo group exhibited neurological stability at 2 years (<2-point increase in NIS+7 score; P = .007). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy, the use of diflunisal compared with placebo for 2 years reduced the rate of progression of neurological impairment and preserved quality of life. Although longer-term follow-up studies are needed, these findings suggest benefit of this treatment for familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

  • 3.
    Carlsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Sundsvall Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, SE-85186 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Burström, Lage
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Heldestad Lilliesköld, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Sundsvall Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, SE-85186 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Neurosensory sequelae assessed by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds after local cold injury2014In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 73, article id 23540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Local freezing cold injuries are common in the north and sequelae to cold injury can persist many years. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to assess neurosensory symptoms but has previously not been used on cold injury patients.

    Objective. To evaluate neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds and by symptom descriptions.

    Design. Fifteen patients with a local freezing cold injury in the hands or feet, acquired during military training, were studied with QST by assessment of vibrotactile (VPT), warmth (WPT) and cold (CPT) perception thresholds 4 months post-injury. In addition, a follow-up questionnaire, focusing on neurovascular symptoms, was completed 4 months and 4 years post-injury.

    Results. QST demonstrated abnormal findings in one or both affected hands for VPT in 6 patients, for WPT in 4 patients and for CPT in 1 patient. In the feet, QST was abnormal for VPT in one or both affected feet in 8 patients, for WPT in 6 patients and for CPT in 4 patients. Freezing cold injury related symptoms, e. g. pain/discomfort when exposed to cold, cold sensation and white fingers were common at 4 months and persisted 4 years after the initial injury.

    Conclusions. Neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury, in terms of abnormal thermal and/or vibration perception thresholds, may last at least 4 months after the initial injury. Symptoms such as pain/discomfort at cold exposure, cold sensations and white fingers may persist at least 4 years after the initial injury.

  • 4. Dyck, P. J.
    et al.
    Wang, A. K.
    Kincaid, J. C.
    Wiesman, J. F.
    Chaudhry, V
    Robinson-Papp, J.
    Coelho, T.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Monia, B. P.
    Hughes, S.
    Ackermann, E. J.
    Litchy, W. J.
    Davies, J.
    Dyck, P. J. B.
    Evaluation of modifications of nis+7 score in oligonucleotide trials in ttr fap2015In: Journal of the peripheral nervous system, ISSN 1085-9489, E-ISSN 1529-8027, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 132-133Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Heldestad Lilliesköld, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Method-of-limits: Cold and warm perception thresholds at proximal and distal body regions2018In: Clinical neurophysiology practice, ISSN 2467-981X, Vol. 3, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Thermal quantitative sensory testing with the 'Method-of-Limits' is an established rationale for detection of small nerve fiber dysfunction, but adequate reference values are crucial for such evaluations, regardless of the underlying cause. This study assessed reference data for cold- (CPT) and warm- (WPT) perception thresholds at both proximal and distal sites in eight body regions of the lower and upper extremities, all determined within the same test session for each subject.

    Methods: Seventy-five healthy subjects (aged 16-72 years) were tested according to the method-of-limit for CPT and WPT at the dorsum of the foot, the medial and lateral lower leg, the ventral thigh, the thenar eminence, the radial and ulnar part of the lower arm, and the anterior deltoid part of the upper arm.

    Results: Overall, thermal perception thresholds (TPT) varied with test location, but were higher in the lower than in the upper part of the body, also WPT were generally higher than CPT. TPT at the dorsum foot highly correlated with age, while inconsistent correlations were noted between TPT and age or height at other tested locations.

    Conclusion: This study describes for the first time reference values at eight defined body regions, at both proximal and distal sites.

    Significance: The report enables refined evaluations of general small nerve fiber function, as assessed by quantitative thermal sensory testing with the Method-of-Limits.

  • 6.
    Heldestad, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Sellersjö, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Reproducibility and influence of test modality order on thermal perception and thermal pain thresholds in quantitative sensory testing2010In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 121, no 11, p. 1878-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The findings show that QST with the MLI is a reliable tool for indirect evaluation of human small nerve fiber function.

  • 7.
    Heldestad, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Quantified sensory abnormalities in early genetically verified transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy2007In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Heldestad, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Thermal perception thresholds: reference data and response characteristicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish reference data for separate cold and warm perception thresholds at quantitative sensory testing with the method-of-limits at eight different body regions, and to evaluate the psychophysical response characteristics to consecutive cold and warm stimuli.

    Methods: 75 healthy subjects were tested at the dorsum of the foot, the medial and lateral lower leg, the ventral thigh, the thenar eminence, the radial and ulnar part of the lower arm, and the anterior deltoid part of the upper arm. Thermal perception thresholds were assessed with the method of limits, and estimated from the average responses during ten consecutive cold and warm stimuli.

    Results: At all tested sites, the TPT were significantly higher in the lower part of the body compared to the upper, and also the warm thresholds were significantly higher than the cold thresholds. Inconsistent correlations were noted between thermal perception thresholds and age or height, but thresholds at the dorsal foot were highly correlated with age.

    Conclusions: Reference data from separate body regions in the lower and upper extremities are essential for adequate evaluation of thermal detection and perception capacity. At testing of thermal thresholds in individual subjects the thermal perception generally decreases distally in elderly and particularly in the lower extremities.

  • 9.
    Heldestad, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hörnsten, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Obayashi, Konen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Comparison of quantitative sensory testing and heart rate variability in Swedish Val30Met ATTR2011In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) polyneuropathy, a hereditary fatal disease, often report defects in both thermal perception and autonomic nervous system function as their first clinical symptoms. While elevated thermal perception thresholds (TPT) for cold and warmth only recently have been shown as an early marker of small nerve fiber dysfunction in these patients, heart rate variability (HRV) has frequently been used to quantify autonomic neuropathy. The main purpose with this report was to elucidate a possible relationship between estimates of HRV and TPT in a selected group of early and late-onset Swedish Val30Met ATTR patients. The results show significantly more pronounced elevation of TPT in early compared to late-onset patients. Significant correlations between HRV and TPT were found among late-onset cases, indicating a possible relationship between loss of thin nerve fibers in somatic and autonomic nerves, while generally no such relationships were found among early-onset cases. This observation emphasizes the importance of testing both HRV and TPT to ensure optimal early detection of neuropathic changes in an as wide as possible range of small nerve fibers in suspected ATTR patients. This is of particular importance as the phenotype of the ATTR disease varies between groups with different age of onset.

  • 10.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Altered thermal sensitivity in facial skin in chronic whiplash-associated disorders2013In: International Journal of Oral Science, ISSN 1674-2818, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 150-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a close functional relationship between the jaw and neck regions and it has been suggested that trigeminal sensory impairment can follow whiplash injury. Inclusion of manageable routines for valid assessment of the facial sensory capacity is thus needed for comprehensive evaluations of patients exposed to such trauma. The present study investigated facial thermal thresholds in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) with both a qualitative method and quantitative sensory testing (QST). Ten women with pain and dysfunction following a whiplash injury were compared to 10 healthy age-matched women. Thermal detection thresholds were assessed by qualitative chair-side testing and by QST according to the method-of-limits. Seven test sites in the facial skin (overlying each trigeminal branch bilaterally, and the midpoint of the chin) were examined. The detection warm and cold thresholds were defined as the mean values of 10 individual thresholds. For the WAD patients, the qualitative assessment demonstrated both reduced and increased sensitivity compared to the healthy, whereas QST systematically showed significantly higher detection thresholds (i.e., decreased sensitivity) for both cold and warm stimuli. For the individuals who were assessed as having increased sensitivity in the qualitative assessment, the QST displayed either normal or higher thresholds, i.e., decreased sensitivity. The results suggest that QST is more sensitive for detecting thermal sensory disturbances in the face than a qualitative method. The impaired thermal sensitivity among the patients corroborates the notion of altered thermal detection capacity induced by WAD-related pain.

  • 11.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Increased sternocleidomastoid, but not trapezius, muscle activity in response to increased chewing load2013In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous findings, during chewing, that boluses of larger size and harder texture result in larger amplitudes of both mandibular and head-neck movements suggest a relationship between increased chewing load and incremental recruitment of jaw and neck muscles. The present report evaluated jaw (masseter and digastric) and neck [sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and trapezius] muscle activity during the chewing of test foods of different sizes and textures by 10 healthy subjects. Muscle activity was recorded by surface electromyography and simultaneous mandibular and head movements were recorded using an optoelectronic technique. Each subject performed continuous jaw-opening/jaw-closing movements whilst chewing small and large boluses of chewing gum and rubber silicone (Optosil). For jaw opening/jaw closing without a bolus, SCM activity was recorded for jaw opening concomitantly with digastric activity. During chewing, SCM activity was recorded for jaw closing concomitantly with masseter activity. Trapezius activity was present in some, but not all, cycles. For the masseter and SCM muscles, higher activity was seen with larger test foods, suggesting increased demand and recruitment of these muscles in response to an increased chewing load. This result reinforces the previous notion of a close functional connection between the jaw and the neck motor systems in jaw actions and has scientific and clinical significance for studying jaw function and dysfunction.

  • 12.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Eriksson, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Head Immobilization can Impair Jaw Function2006In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 85, no 11, p. 1001-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings that jaw-opening/-closing relies on both mandibular and head movements suggest that jaw and neck muscles are jointly activated in jaw function. This study tested the hypothesis that rhythmic jaw activities involve an active repositioning of the head, and that head fixation can impair jaw function. Concomitant mandiular and head-neck movements were recorded during rhythmic jaw activities in 12 healthy adults, with and without fixation of the head. In four participants, the movement recording was combined with simultaneous registration of myoelectric activity in jaw and neck muscles. The results showed neck muscle activity during jaw opening with and without head fixation. Notably, head fixation led to reduced mandibular movements and shorter duration of jaw-opening/-closing cycles. The findings suggest recruitment of neck muscles in jaw activities, and that head fixation can impair jaw function. The results underline the jaw and neck neuromuscular relationship in jaw function.

  • 13.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Control of phonatory onset and offset in Parkinson patients following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus and caudal Zona Incerta2012In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 824-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laryngeal hypokinesia is a common symptom in Parkinson’s disease (PD) that affects quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is well recognized as a complementary method for treatment of motor symptoms in PD but the outcomes on patients’ control over phonatory alternation have yet not been clearly elucidated. The present study examined the effect of subthalamic nucleus STN-DBS (n=8, aged 51-72 yrs; median=63 yrs) and caudal Zona incerta cZi-DBS (n=8,aged 49-71 yrs; median=61 yrs) on control of onset and offset of phonation in connected speech. The patients were evaluated in a preoperatively (Med ON, 1.5 times the ordinary Levodopa dose) and 12 months postoperatively (Med ON, ordinary Levodopa dose). The results provided evidence of a progressive reduction in the ability to manifest alternations between voicing and voiceless states in a reading task. Mean proportion produced with inappropriate voicing increased from 47.6% to 55.3% and from 62.9% to 68.6% of the total duration for the two groups of patients between Pre-op and Post-op, Stim OFF evaluations. The medial and final parts of the fricative were more affected than the initial part, indicating an increased voicing lead into the following vowel. We propose that this reduction in phonatory control is be due to either progression of the disease, an effect of reduced Levodopa dosage or a microlesional effect. Patients’ proficiency in alternating between voiced and voiceless states in connected speech remained unaffected by both STN-DBS and cZi-DBS.

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Malinova, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Voice Tremor Outcomes of Subthalamic Nucleus and Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients With Parkinson Disease2019In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 545-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We aimed to study the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and caudal zona incerta (cZi) on level of perceived voice tremor in patients with Parkinson disease (PD).

    Study Design: This is a prospective nonrandomized design with consecutive patients.

    Methods: Perceived voice tremor was assessed in patients with PD having received either STN-DBS (8 patients, 5 bilateral and 3 unilateral, aged 43.1-73.6 years; median = 61.2 years) or cZi-DBS (14 bilateral patients, aged 39.0-71.9 years; median = 56.6 years) 12 months before the assessment. Sustained vowels that were produced OFF and ON stimulation (with simultaneous L-DOPA medication) were assessed perceptually in terms of voice tremor by two raters on a four-point rating scale. The assessments were repeated five times per sample and rated in a blinded and randomized procedure.

    Results: Three out of the 22 patients (13%) were concluded to have voice tremor OFF stimulation. Patients with PD with STN-DBS showed mild levels of perceived voice tremor OFF stimulation and a group level improvement. Patients with moderate/severe perceived voice tremor and cZi-DBS showed marked improvements, but there was no overall group effect. Six patients with cZi-DBS showed small increases in perceived voice tremor severity.

    Conclusions: STN-DBS decreased perceived voice tremor on a group level. cZi-DBS decreased perceived voice tremor in patients with PD with moderate to severe preoperative levels of the symptom.

  • 15.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Linder, Jan
    Nordh, Erik
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Articulatory closure proficiency in Parkinson's disease patients following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus and caudal zona incerta.2014In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 57, p. 1178-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE

    The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on Parkinson's disease patients' proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production. METHODS Nineteen patients were evaluated preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Nine patients were implanted in the STN, seven bilaterally and two unilaterally (left). Ten were bilaterally implanted in the cZi. Postoperative examinations were made off and on stimulation. All patients received simultaneous L-dopa treatment in all conditions. For a series of plosives extracted from a reading passage, absolute and relative measures of duration of frication and amplitude of plosive release were compared between conditions within each treatment group. RESULTS Relative duration of frication increased in voiceless plosives in the on stimulation condition in cZi patients. Similar trends were observed across the data set. Duration of pre-release frication and the release peak prominence increased in voiceless plosives on stimulation for both groups. CONCLUSIONS The increased release prominence suggests that patients achieved a stronger closure gesture due to DBS, but that the increased energy available resulted in increased frication.

  • 16.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Unger, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Wahlgren, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Doorn, Jan van
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Deep brain stimulation of caudal zona incerta and subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson’s disease: effects on diadochokinetic rate2011In: Parkinson’s Disease, ISSN 2042-0080, Vol. 2011, p. 605607-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypokinetic dysarthria observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects the range, speed, and accuracy of articulatory gestures in patients, reducing the perceived quality of speech acoustic output in continuous speech. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) and of the caudal zona incerta (cZi-DBS) are current surgical treatment options for PD. This study aimed at investigating the outcome of STN-DBS (7 patients) and cZi-DBS (7 patients) in two articulatory diadochokinesis tasks (AMR and SMR) using measurements of articulation rate and quality of the plosive consonants (using the percent measurable VOT metric). The results indicate that patients receiving STN-DBS increased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition in the AMR task only, with no effect on production quality. Patients receiving cZi-DBS decreased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition and further showed a reduction in production quality. The data therefore suggest that cZi-DBS is more detrimental for extended articulatory movements than STN-DBS.

  • 17.
    Kulneff, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Sundstedt, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Deep brain stimulation: effects on swallowing function in Parkinson's disease2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 127, no 5, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), deep brainstimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) is well recognizedin improving limb function, but the outcome on swallowing functionhas rarely been studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate theeffect of STN DBS on pharyngeal swallowing function in patientswith PD using self-estimation and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation ofswallowing.

    Methods: Eleven patients (aged 41–72, median 61 years)were evaluated preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months after STN DBSsurgery. All patients were evaluated with self-estimation on a visualanalogue scale, and eight of them with a fiberoptic endoscopicexamination with a predefined swallowing protocol includingRosenbek’s Penetration-Aspiration Scale, Secretion Severity Scale,preswallow spillage, pharyngeal residue, and pharyngeal clearance.

    Results: The self-assessments of swallowing function revealed asubjective improvement with STN DBS stimulation, whereas the datafrom the swallowing protocol did not show any significant effect ofthe STN DBS treatment itself. The prevalence of aspiration was notaffected by the surgery.

    Conclusions: The results show thatswallowing function was not negatively affected by STN DBS and therisk of aspiration did not increase. Self-estimation of swallowingfunction showed a subjective improvement due to stimulation.

  • 18.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial pain and Jaw function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Effects on jaw function shortly after whiplash trauma2017In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 941-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal jaw function involves muscles and joints of both jaw and neck. A whiplash trauma may disturb the integrated jaw-neck sensory-motor function and thereby impair chewing ability; however, it is not known if such impairment is present shortly after a neck trauma or develops over time. The aim was to evaluate jaw function after a recent whiplash trauma. Eighty cases (47 women) were examined within 1 month after a whiplash trauma and compared to 80 controls (47 women) without neck trauma. Participants completed the Jaw disability checklist (JDC) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaires and performed a 5-minute chewing test. Elicited fatigue and pain during chewing were noted, and group differences were evaluated with Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Compared to controls, cases had higher JDC (P<.0001) and NDI scores (15% vs 2%, P<.0001), and reported more fatigue (53% vs 31%, P=.006) and pain (30% vs 10%, P=.003) during the chewing test. Cases also had a shorter onset time for fatigue and pain (both P=.001) Furthermore, cases reporting symptoms during chewing had higher JDC and NDI scores compared to cases not reporting symptoms (both P=.01). Symptoms mainly occurred in the trigeminal area for both groups, but also in spinal areas more often for cases than for controls. Taken together, the results indicate that jaw-neck sensory-motor function is impaired already within 1month after a whiplash trauma. The association between neck disability and jaw impairment underlines the close functional relationship between the regions, and stresses the importance of multidisciplinary assessment.

  • 19.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    The Course of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Disability after Whiplash Trauma: A 2-year Prospective StudyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    The Course of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Disability after Whiplash Trauma: A 2-year Prospective Study.2019In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the course of orofacial pain and jaw disability in relation to neck pain, neck disability and psychosocial factors at the acute stage and the chronic stage after whiplash trauma.Summary of Background Data Many individuals report chronic pain in the orofacial region after whiplash trauma. The possible association between whiplash trauma and orofacial pain is debated. Prospective studies are therefore needed to evaluate the development of orofacial pain after whiplash trauma.

    METHODS: Within one month following a whiplash trauma, 176 cases were examined and compared to 116 controls with questionnaires concerning neck and jaw pain and related disability, non-specific physical symptoms and depression. At the 2-year follow-up, 119 cases (68%) and 104 controls (90%) were re-examined.

    RESULTS: Compared to controls, cases reported more jaw and neck pain, both at baseline and follow-up. A majority (68%) of cases with pain in the jaw region in the acute stage also reported jaw pain at the follow-up. The intensity of jaw and neck pain was correlated both at baseline and follow-up. Both neck pain and jaw pain was correlated to non-specific physical symptoms and to depression.

    CONCLUSION: Orofacial pain and jaw disability related to neck pain is often present already at the acute stage after whiplash trauma and persist into the chronic stage for most individuals. Assessment following whiplash trauma should therefore include both the neck and the orofacial regions. More studies are needed to further evaluate risk factors for development of orofacial pain after whiplash trauma.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.

  • 21.
    Linder, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Libelius, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Holmberg, Björn
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology/Neurology Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Anal sphincter electromyography in patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic parkinsonism2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The differential diagnosis of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism is difficult, especially early in the course of the disease. External anal sphincter electromyography has been reported to be of value in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson’s disease and multiple system atrophy. Patients with multiple system atrophy are reported to have pathological external anal sphincter electromyography and patients with Parkinson’s disease are reported to have significantly less pathological external anal sphincter electromyography results. Comparisons between patients with parkinsonian disorders have usually been made many years into the disease, and thus it is largely unknown if the results of external anal sphincter electromyography can be used to distinguish the different diagnoses in the early phase of the disease.

    Material and methods We investigated 148 newly diagnosed patients with idiopathic parkinsonism from a population-based incidence cohort (100 definite Parkinson’s disease, 21 probable Parkinson’s disease, 16 multiple system atrophy, eleven progressive supranuclear palsy, and 40 controls) with external anal sphincter electromyography within three months of their first visit and, in the majority of patients, before start of treatment with dopaminergic drugs. The clinical diagnoses were made using established clinical diagnostic criteria after a median follow-up of three years.

    Results All patient groups had more pathological external anal sphincter electromyography results than controls. No external anal sphincter electromyography differences were found between the patient groups, especially not between Parkinson’s disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Conclusions External anal sphincter electromyography examination cannot separate the different parkinsonian subgroups from each other in early course of the diseases.

  • 22.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Naredi, Silvana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Olivecrona, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Frequency of non-convulsive Seizures and non-convulsive status Epilepticus in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage patients in need of controlled ventilation and sedation2012In: Neurocritical Care, ISSN 1541-6933, E-ISSN 1556-0961, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 367-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Non-convulsive seizures (NCSZ) can be more prevalent than previously recognized among comatose neuro-intensive care patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of NCSZ and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) in sedated and ventilated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients.

    METHODS: Retrospective study at a university hospital neuro-intensive care unit, from January 2008 until June 2010. Patients were treated according to a local protocol, and were initially sedated with midazolam or propofol or combinations of these sedative agents. Thiopental was added for treatment of intracranial hypertension. No wake-up tests were performed. Using NicoletOne((R)) equipment (VIASYS Healthcare Inc., USA), continuous EEG recordings based on four electrodes and a reference electrode was inspected at full length both in a two electrode bipolar and a four-channel referential montage.

    RESULTS: Approximately 5,500 h of continuous EEG were registered in 28 SAH patients (33 % of the patients eligible for inclusion). The median Glasgow Coma scale was 8 (range 3-14) and the median Hunt and Hess score was 4 (range 1-4). During EEG registration, no clinical seizures were observed. In none of the patients inter ictal epileptiform activity was seen. EEG seizures were recorded only in 2/28 (7 %) patients. One of the patients experienced 4 min of an NCSZ and one had a 5 h episode of an NCSE.

    CONCLUSION: Continuous EEG monitoring is important in detecting NCSZ in sedated patients. Continuous sedation, without wake-up tests, was associated with a low frequency of subclinical seizures in SAH patients in need of controlled ventilation.

  • 23.
    Louise, Johansson
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Sofia, Möller
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Doorn, Jan van
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Word-level intelligibility after caudal zona incerta stimulation for Parkinson’s disease2014In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives – To investigate the effect of caudal zona incerta-deep brain stimulation (cZi-DBS) on word-level speech intelligibility in patients with Parkinson’s disease, under both an optimal listening condition and a simulated more naturalistic listening condition.

    Materials and methods – Spoken single words were extracted from read samples collected from 10 bilaterally implanted patients with PD pre- and post-cZi-DBS. Intelligibility was assessed through a transcription task performed by 32 naive listeners under two listening conditions: (i) with low-amplitude conversational speech added as background and (ii) with no added background noise. The listeners′ responses were scored in terms of agreement with the intended words.

    Results – Post-operatively, the total intelligibility score was significantly lower when cZi stimulation was switched on compared with off, for both listening conditions (with and without added background noise). Intelligibility was also significantly lower on stimulation compared with preoperative recordings, but only when assessed in the listening condition without background noise. The listening condition with added background noise resulted in significantly lower intelligibility scores compared with the no added noise condition for all stimulation conditions.

    Conclusions – The results of this study indicate that cZi-DBS in patients with PD can be detrimental to word-level speech intelligibility. 

  • 24.
    Lundgren, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Saeys, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Doorn, Jan van
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Deep brain stimulation of caudal zona incerta and subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson’s disease: effects on voice intensity2011In: Parkinson’s Disease, ISSN 2042-0080, Vol. 2011, p. 658956-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects speech in small, inconsistent ways. However, voice intensity generally increases. Recently the caudal zona inserta (cZi) has been investigated as an alternate target in DBS treatment of PD. The effects of cZi-DBS on voice intensity have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the voice intensity effects of cZi-DBS and STN-DBS in PD patients. Voice intensity during reading and intensity decay during rapid syllable repetition were measured for eight STN-DBS and eight cZi-DBS patients in a pre-surgical baseline and then on- and off-stimulation 12 months after surgery. Voice intensity on-stimulation was larger than off-stimulation for the STN-DBS patients, but smaller for the cZi-DBS patients. There were no significant changes in intensity decay. The results suggest that cZi and STN are involved differently in neuromuscular control of the speech respiratory subsystem.

  • 25.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Kulneff, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Djup hjärnstimulering vid dysfagi hos parkinsonpatienter: den självskattade sväljningsfunktionen förbättrades i pilotstudie2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 17, p. 1150-1154Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Sundstedt, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Holmén, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Rova, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Swallowing safety in Parkinson's disease after zona incerta Deep Brain Stimulation2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 6, article id e00709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine swallowing function in patients with Parkinson's disease before and after caudal zona incerta deep brain (cZI DBS) surgery. The aims were to examine the effect of cZI DBS on swallowing safety regarding liquid and solid food, as well as to identify the effect of cZI DBS on body mass index (BMI) and specific items from part II of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS).

    Materials and Methods: The median age of the 14 patients was 57 years (range 46–71), with a median disease duration of 6 years (range 2–13). The present sample is an extension of a previous report, into which six additional patients have been added. Fiber endoscopic examinations of swallowing function, measures of BMI, and evaluation of UPDRS part II items were made before and 12 months after surgery, with and without activated DBS.

    Results: There were no significant changes due to cZI DBS regarding penetration/aspiration, pharyngeal residue or premature spillage (> .05). Median BMI increased by +1.1 kg/m2 12 months after surgery (= .01, = .50). All reported specific symptoms from the UPDRS part II were slight or mild. A significant improvement regarding handling of utensils was seen 12 months postoperatively (= .03, = −.42).

    Conclusions: Caudal zona incerta DBS was found not to have a negative impact on swallowing safety. A significant increase in postoperative weight was observed, and speech seemed to be slightly negatively affected, whereas handling of utensils was improved with cZI DBS.

  • 27.
    Sundstedt, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Hedström, Johanna
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Finizia, Caterina
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    ­­Swallowing quality of life after zona incerta Deep brain stimulation2017In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, ISSN 0003-4894, E-ISSN 1943-572X, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 110-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The management of Parkinson’s disease (PD) has been improved, but management of features like swallowing problems is still challenging. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) alleviates the cardinal motor symptoms and improves quality of life, but its effect on swallowing is not fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported swallowing specific quality of life, before and after caudal zona incerta DBS (cZI DBS), in comparison with a control group.

    Methods: Nine PD patients (2 women and 7 men) completed the self-report Swallowing Quality of Life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) before and 12 months after cZI DBS surgery. The postoperative data were compared to nine controls. Median ages were 53 years (range 40-70) for patients and 54 years (range 42-72) for controls.

    Results: No significant differences were found between the pre-, or postoperative scores. The SWAL-QOL total scores did not differ significantly between PD patients and controls. PD patients reported significantly lower scores in the 'burden' subscale and in the 'symptom' scale.

    Conclusions: PD patients selected for cZI DBS showed a good self-reported swallowing specific quality of life, in many aspects equal to controls. CZI DBS did not negatively affect swallowing specific quality of life in this study.

  • 28.
    Sundstedt, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Swallowing function in Parkinson’s patients following Zona Incerta deep brain stimulation2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 350-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine if there was a negative effect of caudal Zona Incerta deep brain stimulation (cZI DBS) on pharyngeal swallowing function in Parkinson’s patients (PD). There are no former reports on swallowing and cZI DBS.

    Methods Eight patients (aged 49 to 71 years; median 62) were evaluated pre- and postoperatively, at six and 12 months after DBS surgery. Evaluation tools were Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing examinations and patients’ self-assessments of the swallowing function including a visual analogue scale and quality of life related questions. The swallowing protocol included Rosenbeck’s Penetration-Aspiration Scale, Secretion Severity Scale and parameters for pre-swallow spillage, pharyngeal residue and pharyngeal clearance.

    Results There was no clear-cut effect of neurostimulation postoperatively at six and 12 months on any of the swallowing parameters except for pre-swallow spillage which was slightly worsened in the stimulation on condition 12m postoperatively. The answers to the self assessment questions did not vary significantly.

    Conclusions The effect of the stimulation on swallowing function varied among individuals but the overall outcome was that cZI DBS did not seem to have a negative influence on swallowing function in the eight patients studied.

1 - 28 of 28
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