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  • 1.
    Jakobson Mo, Susanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Jonasson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Larsson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Ögren, Mattias J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Ögren, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Varrone, Andrea
    Eriksson, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Bäckström, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    af Bjerkén, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Dopamine transporter imaging with [18F]FE-PE2I PET and [123I]FP-CIT SPECT – a clinical comparison2018In: EJNMMI Research, ISSN 2191-219X, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 8, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging may be of diagnostic value in patients with clinically suspected parkinsonian disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of DAT imaging with positron emission computed tomography (PET), using the recently developed, highly DAT-selective radiopharmaceutical [18F]FE-PE2I (FE-PE2I), to the commercially available and frequently used method with [123I]FP-CIT (FP-CIT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early-stage idiopathic parkinsonian syndrome (PS).

    Methods: Twenty-two patients with a clinical de novo diagnosis of PS and 28 healthy controls (HC) participating in an on-going clinical trial of FE-PE2I were analyzed in this study. Within the trial protocol, participants are clinically reassessed 2 years after inclusion. A commercially available software was used for automatic calculation of FP-CIT-specific uptake ratio (SUR). MRI-based volumes of interest combined with threshold PET segmentation were used for FE-PE2I binding potential relative to non-displaceable binding (BPND) quantification and specific uptake value ratios (SUVR).

    Results: PET with FE-PE2I revealed significant differences between patients with a clinical de novo diagnosis of PS and healthy controls in striatal DAT availability (p < 0.001), with excellent accuracy of predicting dopaminergic deficit in early-stage PS. The effect sizes were calculated for FE-PE2I BPND (Glass’s Δ = 2.95), FE-PE2I SUVR (Glass’s Δ = 2.57), and FP-CIT SUR (Glass’s Δ = 2.29). The intraclass correlation (ICC) between FE-PE2I BPND FP-CIT SUR was high in the caudate (ICC = 0.923), putamen (ICC = 0.922), and striatum (ICC = 0.946), p < 0.001. Five of the 22 patients displayed preserved striatal DAT availability in the striatum with both methods. At follow-up, a non-PS clinical diagnosis was confirmed in three of these, while one was clinically diagnosed with corticobasal syndrome. In these patients, FE-PE2I binding was also normal in the substantia nigra (SN), while significantly reduced in the remaining patients. FE-PE2I measurement of the mean DAT availability in the putamen was strongly correlated with BPND in the SN (R = 0.816, p < 0.001). Olfaction and mean putamen DAT availability was correlated using both FE-PE2I BPND and FP-CIT SUR (R ≥ 0.616, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion: DAT imaging with FE-PE2I PET yields excellent basic diagnostic differentiation in early-stage PS, at least as good as FP-CIT SPECT.

  • 2.
    Jonasson, Lars S.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Braver, Todd S.
    Department of Psychology,Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, SE-113 30 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Dopamine release in nucleus accumbens during rewarded task switching measured by [11C]raclopride2014In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 99, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reward and motivation have positive influences on cognitive-control processes in numerous settings. Models of reward implicate corticostriatal loops and the dopamine (DA) system, with special emphasis on D2 receptors in nucleus accumbens (NAcc). In this study, 11 right-handed males (35-40 years) were scanned with positron emission tomography (PET) in a single [(11)C]raclopride dynamic scan during rewarded and non-rewarded task switching. Rewarded task switching (relative to baseline task switching) decreased [(11)C]raclopride binding in NAcc. Decreasing NAcc [(11)C]raclopride binding was strongly associated with task reaction time measures that reflect individual differences in effort and control strategies. Voxelwise analyses additionally revealed reward-related DA release in anterodorsal caudate, a region previously associated with task-switching. These PET findings provide evidence for striatal DA release during motivated cognitive control, and further suggest that NAcc DA release predicts the task reaction time benefits of reward incentives.

  • 3.
    Lizana, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Larsson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Halldin, Christer
    Varrone, Andrea
    Jakobson Mo, Susanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Whole-Body Biodistribution and Dosimetry of the Dopamine Transporter Radioligand 18F-FE-PE2I in Human Subjects2018In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 59, no 8, p. 1275-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F-18-(E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2-enyl)-2 beta-carbofluoroethoxy-3 beta-(4'-methylphenyl) nortropane (F-18-FE-PE2I) was recently developed and has shown adequate affinity and high selectivity for the dopamine transporter (DAT). Previous studies have shown promising results for F-18-FE-PE2I as a suitable radioligand for DAT imaging. In this study, we investigated the whole-body biodistribution and dosimetry of F-18-FE-PE2I in healthy volunteers to support its utility as a suitable PET imaging agent for the DAT. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were given a mean activity of 2.5 MBq/kg, and 3 PET scans, head to thigh, were performed immediately after injection followed by 4 whole-body PET/CT scans between 0.5 and 6 h after injection. Blood samples were drawn in connection with the whole-body scans, and all urine was collected until 6 h after injection. Volumes of interest were delineated around 17 organs on all images, and the areas under the time-activity curves were calculated to obtain the total number of decays in the organs. The absorbed doses to organs and the effective dose were calculated using the software IDAC. Results: The highest activity concentration was observed in the liver (0.9%-1.2% injected activity/100 g) up to 30 min after injection. At later time points, the highest concentration was seen in the gallbladder (1.1%-0.1% injected activity/100 g). The activity excreted with urine ranged between 23% and 34%, with a mean of 28%. The urinary bladder received the highest absorbed dose (119 mu Gy/MBq), followed by the liver (46 mu Gy/MBq). The effective dose was 23 mu Sv/MBq (range, 19-28 mu Sv/MBq), resulting in an effective dose of 4.6 mSv for an administered activity of 200 MBq. Conclusion: The effective dose is within the same order of magnitude as other commonly used PET imaging agents as well as DAT agents. The reasonable effective dose, together with the previously reported favorable characteristics for DAT imaging and quantification, indicates that F-18-FE-PE2I is a suitable radioligand for DAT imaging.

  • 4.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lövdén, M
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Lindenberger, U
    Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
    Bäckman, L
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    COBRA: A prospective multimodal imaging study of dopamine, brain structure and function, and cognition.2015In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1612, p. 83-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive decline is a characteristic feature of normal human aging. Previous work has demonstrated marked interindividual variability in onset and rate of decline. Such variability has been linked to factors such as maintenance of functional and structural brain integrity, genetics, and lifestyle. Still, few, if any, studies have combined a longitudinal design with repeated multimodal imaging and a comprehensive assessment of cognition as well as genetic and lifestyle factors. The present paper introduces the Cognition, Brain, and Aging (COBRA) study, in which cognitive performance and brain structure and function are measured in a cohort of 181 older adults aged 64 to 68 years at baseline. Participants will be followed longitudinally over a 10-year period, resulting in a total of three equally spaced measurement occasions. The measurement protocol at each occasion comprises a comprehensive set of behavioral and imaging measures. Cognitive performance is evaluated via computerized testing of working memory, episodic memory, perceptual speed, motor speed, implicit sequence learning, and vocabulary. Brain imaging is performed using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]-raclopride to assess dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for assessment of white and gray-matter integrity and cerebrovascular perfusion, and functional MRI maps brain activation during rest and active task conditions. Lifestyle descriptives are collected, and blood samples are obtained and stored for future evaluation. Here, we present selected results from the baseline assessment along with a discussion of sample characteristics and methodological considerations that determined the design of the study.

  • 5.
    Sandgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jonsson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Ögren, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Andersson, Martin
    Strandberg, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Radiation dosimetry of [Ga-68]PSMA-11 in low-risk prostate cancer patients2019In: EJNMMI Physics, ISSN 2197-7364, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 6, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: 68Ga-labeled Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]PSMA-11) has been increasingly used to image prostate cancer using positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) both during diagnosis and treatment planning. It has been shown to be of clinical value for patients both in the primary and secondary stages of prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the effective dose and organ doses from injection of [68Ga]PSMA-11 in a cohort of low-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Methods: Six low-risk prostate cancer patients were injected with 133–178 MBq [68Ga]PSMA-11 and examined with four PET/CT acquisitions from injection to 255 min post-injection. Urine was collected up to 4 h post-injection, and venous blood samples were drawn at 45 min, 85 min, 175 min, and 245 min post-injection. Kidneys, liver, lungs, spleen, salivary and lacrimal glands, and total body where delineated, and cumulated activities and absorbed organ doses calculated. The software IDAC-Dose 2.1 was used to calculate absorbed organ doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 107 using specific absorbed fractions published in ICRP 133 and effective dose according to ICRP Publication 103. We also estimated the absorbed dose to the eye lenses using Monte Carlo methods.

    Results: [68Ga]PSMA-11 was rapidly cleared from the blood and accumulated preferentially in the kidneys and the liver. The substance has a biological half-life in blood of 6.5 min (91%) and 4.4 h (9%). The effective dose was calculated to 0.022 mSv/MBq. The kidneys received approximately 40 mGy after an injection with 160 MBq [68Ga]PSMA-11 while the lacrimal glands obtained an absorbed dose of 0.12 mGy per administered MBq. Regarding the eye lenses, the absorbed dose was low (0.0051 mGy/MBq).

    Conclusion: The effective dose for [68Ga]PSMA-11 is 0.022 mSv/MBq, where the kidneys and lacrimal glands receiving the highest organ dose.

  • 6.
    Strandberg, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Karlsson, Camilla Thellenberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Ögren, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    11C-acetate PET/CT in pre-therapeutic lymph node staging in high-risk prostate cancer patients and its influence on disease management: a retrospective study2014In: EJNMMI Research, ISSN 2191-219X, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 4, no 55, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Radiation treatment with simultaneous integrated boost against suspected lymph node metastases may be a curative therapeutic option in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (> 15% estimated risk of pelvic lymph node metastases according to the Cagiannos nomogram). C-11-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be used for primary staging as well as for detection of suspected relapse of prostate cancer. The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between positive C-11-acetate PET/CT findings and the estimated risk of pelvic lymph node metastases and to assess the impact of C-11-acetate PET/CT on patient management in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Fifty consecutive prostate cancer patients referred for primary staging with C-11-acetate PET/CT prior to radiotherapy with curative intention were enrolled in this retrospective study. Results: All patients showed increased C-11-acetate uptake in the prostate. Pelvic lymph node uptake was seen in 42% (21/50) of the patients, with positive external iliac lymph nodes in 71% (15/21) of these. The overall observed proportion of PET/CT-positive pelvic lymph nodes at patient level was higher than the average estimated risk, especially in low-risk groups (< 15%). There was a significant association between observed proportion and estimated risk of pelvic lymph node metastases in groups with <= 45 and >45% estimated risk. Treatment strategy was altered due to C-11-acetate PET/CT findings in 43% (20/47) of the patients. Conclusions: The observed proportion of C-11-acetate PET/CT findings suggestive of locoregional metastases was higher than the estimated risk, suggesting that the Cagiannos nomogram underestimates the risk for metastases. The imaging results with C-11-acetate PET/CT have a considerable impact on patient management.

  • 7.
    Strandberg, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Karlsson, Camilla Thellenberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    C-11-Acetate-PET/CT Compared to Tc-99m-HDP Bone Scintigraphy in Primary Staging of High-risk Prostate Cancer2016In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 6475-6479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection rate of bone metastases and the added value of C-11-acetate (ACE) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) compared to bone scintigraphy (BS) in high-risk prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods: A total of 66 untreated patients with high-risk PC with ACE-PET/CT and planar BS findings within 3 months of each other were retrospectively enrolled. Findings were compared and verified with follow-up data after an average of 26 months. Results: The rate of detection of bone metastases was superior with ACE-PET/CT compared to BS (p<0.01). Agreement between the methods and between BS and follow-up was moderate (Cohen's kappa coefficient of 0.64 and 0.66, respectively). Agreement between ACE-PET/CT and follow-up was excellent (kappa coefficient of 0.95). Therapy was changed in 11% of patients due to ACE-PET/CT results. Conclusion: ACE-PET/CT performed better than planar BS in detection of bone metastases in high-risk PC. ACE-PET/CT findings influenced clinical management.

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