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  • 1.
    Daerga, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Girhammar, Ulf Arne
    Kallsner, Bo
    A complete timber building system for multi-storey buildings2014In: Construction materials and structures, 2014, p. 1164-1171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Masonite Flexible Building (MFB) system is a complete timber building system for commercial and residential multi-storey houses. The system is for tall and large buildings with long floor spans. The MFB system uses prefabricated wall, floor and roof elements which are delivered in flat packages and erected on the construction site. The MFB system might be classified as a panel construction, where the load-carrying structure consists of composite lightweight timber I-beams mechanically integrated with a composite laminated wood panel called PlyBoard T. The I-beams and the panel form a strong and rigid carcass for wall and floor elements, making the system well suited for high rise construction. A key feature of the MFB system is the connection technique which enables swift erection of the system units on site. The PlyBoard T panels are provided with a continuous slot along the periphery. The slot is used as a general connection interface for the joining of the wall elements. The floor elements are suspended and hooked onto the bearing walls using sheet steel hangers, allowing swift assembling of the floor deck and enabling direct vertical wall-to-wall load transfer parallel to grain. The paper presents the construction principles, system components and units, erection technique, functional and architectural aspects of the Masonite Building System.

  • 2.
    Daerga, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Girhammar, Ulf Arne
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Källsner, Bo
    Linnæus University.
    Masonite Flexible Building System for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings2012In: World Conference on Timber Engineering 2012 (WCTE 2012) / [ed] Pierre Quenneville, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: The Masonite Flexible Building (MFB) system is a complete timber building system for commercial and residential multi-storey houses. The system is subdivided into two market variants; XL and Light. The XL version is for tall and large buildings with long floor spans while the Light version is adapted for smaller buildings with lower loads. Though differing in technical performance, the functional criteria are the same for both variants. The MFB system uses prefabricated wall, floor and roof elements which are delivered in flat packages and erected on the construction site. The MFB system might be classified as a panel construction, where the load-carrying structure consists of composite light-weight timber I-beams mechanically integrated with a composite laminated wood panel called PlyBoard™. The I-beams and the panel form a strong and rigid carcass for wall and floor elements, making the system well suited for high rise construction. A key feature of the MFB system is the connection technique which enables swift erection of the system units on site. The plyboard panels are provided with a continuous slot along the periphery. The slot is used as a general connection interface for the joining of the wall elements. The floor elements are suspended and hooked onto the bearing walls using sheet steel hangers, allowing swift assembling of the floor deck and enabling direct vertical wall-to-wall load transfer parallel to grain. The paper presents the construction principles, system components and units, erection technique and functional and architectural aspects of the Masonite Building System.

    KEYWORDS: Masonite Flexible Building system, multi-storey timber buildings, slotted-in connections, suspended connections, functionality requirements.

  • 3.
    Daerga, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Girhammar, Ulf Arne
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Källsner, Bo
    Linnæus University.
    Slotted-in Steel-Plate connections for Panel Wall Elements - Experimental and Analytical Study2012In: World Conference on Timber Engineering 2012 (WCTE 2012) / [ed] Pierre Quenneville, 2012, p. 451-460Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an experimental and analytical study of a steel plate connection for joining walls in the Masonite Flexible Building (MFB) system. These connections are used partly for splicing the wall elements and partly for tying down uplifting forces and resisting horizontal shear forces in stabilizing shear walls. The steel plates are inserted in a perimeter slot in the plyboard panel (a composite laminated wood panel) and fixed mechanically with screw fasteners. The load-bearing capacity of the slotted-in steel plate connections are determined experimentally and derived analytically for different failure modes. The test results show ductile post-peak load-slip characteristics, indicating that a plastic design method for shear walls can be applied to calculate the horizontal load-bearing capacity. The slotted-in steel plate connection concept can also be used for joining shear walls to transverse walls for tying down purposes in order to simplify the stabilization system of the building. The use of transverse walls for resisting uplifting forces introduces a three-dimensional behaviour of the wall junction and a more effective load transfer.

  • 4.
    Daerga, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Girhammar, Ulf Arne
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Källsner, Bo
    Linnæus University.
    Suspended Floor Element Connections for the Masonite Flexible Building System2012In: World Conference on Timber Engineering 2012 (WCTE 2012) / [ed] Pierre Quenneville, 2012, p. 465-472Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors present an experimental study of a suspended floor element connection (sheet steel hangers) employed in the Masonite Flexible Building (MFB) system. The hangers are mounted with screws and are pre-attached to the floor elements at manufacturing. This arrangement makes the design of the hanger critical with respect to safety and load transfer redundancy, since the screws transfer all the loads, both withdrawal and shear forces can act simultaneously. Tests have been carried out to examine the structural behaviour of the hanger. The two most critical load cases, vertical floor load and horizontal wind suction load, and three different screw joint configurations were investigated. The results indicate that the vertical distance between the screw joint and the upper edge of the rim beam should be increased and that withdrawal forces on the screws should be kept as low as possible. Some suggestions for improving the present design are given and a modified design is proposed to enhance the load-bearing capacity and to improve the overall safety and redundancy.

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