umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Awad, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Functional imaging of Essential Tremor treated with Deep Brain Stimulation In the caudal Zona incerta2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Awad, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Levi, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Lindgren, Lenita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Hultling, Claes
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (Neurorehabilitation), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Preserved somatosensory conduction in a patient with complete cervical spinal cord injury2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Neurophysiological investigation has shown that patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury can have residual motor sparing ("motor discomplete"). In the current study somatosensory conduction was assessed in a patient with clinically complete spinal cord injury and a novel ethodology for assessing such preservation is described, in this case indicating "sensory discomplete" spinal cord injury. Methods: Blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) was used to examine the somatosensory system in a healthy subject and in a subject with a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury, by applying tactile stimulation above and below the level of spinal cord injury, with and without visual feedback. Results: In the participant with spinal cord injury, somatosensory stimulation below the neurological level of the lesion gave rise to BOLD signal changes in the corresponding areas of the somatosensory cortex. Visual feedback of the stimulation strongly modulated the somatosensory BOLD signal, implying that cortico-cortical rather than spino-cortical connections can drive activity in the somatosensory cortex. Critically, BOLD signal change was also evident when the visual feedback of the stimulation was removed, thus demonstrating sensory discomplete spinal cord injury. Conclusion: Given the existence of sensory discomplete spinal cord injury, preserved but hitherto undetected somatosensory conduction might contribute to the unexplained variability related to, for example, the propensity to develop decubitus ulcers and neuropathic pain among patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury.

  • 3.
    Birznieks, Ingvars
    et al.
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales 2031, Australia.
    Macefield, Vaughan G
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales 2031, Australia.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Johansson, Roland S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Slowly adapting mechanoreceptors in the borders of the human fingernail encode fingertip forces2009In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 29, no 29, p. 9370-9379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are clusters of slowly adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors in the skin folds bordering the nail. These "SA-IInail" afferents, which constitute nearly one fifth of the tactile afferents innervating the fingertip, possess the general discharge characteristics of slowly adapting type II (SA-II) tactile afferents located elsewhere in the glabrous skin of the human hand. Little is known about the signals in the SA-IInail afferents when the fingertips interact with objects. Here we show that SA-IInail afferents reliably respond to fingertip forces comparable to those arising in everyday manipulations. Using a flat stimulus surface, we applied forces to the finger pad while recording impulse activity in 17 SA-IInail afferents. Ramp-and-hold forces (amplitude 4 N, rate 10 N/s) were applied normal to the skin, and at 10, 20, or 30 degrees from the normal in eight radial directions with reference to the primary site of contact (25 force directions in total). All afferents responded to the force stimuli, and the responsiveness of all but one afferents was broadly tuned to a preferred direction of force. The preferred directions among afferents were distributed all around the angular space, suggesting that the population of SA-IInail afferents could encode force direction. We conclude that signals in the population of SA-IInail afferents terminating in the nail walls contain vectorial information about fingertip forces. The particular tactile features of contacted surfaces would less influence force-related signals in SA-IInail afferents than force-related signals present in afferents terminating in the volar skin areas that directly contact objects.

  • 4.
    Edin, Benoni B
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology.
    Howe, Robert
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology.
    Cutkosky, Mark
    A Physiological Method for Relaying Frictional Information to a Human Teleoperator1993In: IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, ISSN 0018-9472, E-ISSN 2168-2909, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 427-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to sense and respond to frictional variations is important for dexterous manipulation. It has been demonstrated that humans apply forces to an object on the basis of its anticipated frictional properties. After contact , tactile receptors provide information on the actual frictional properties and ensure that the applied finger tip allow for a safety margin against slips during the ensuing manipulation. With inappropriate forces, incipient and overt slips occur which produce receptor discharges and elicit automatic adjustments of the finger tip forces to increase the safety margins against future slips. It is demonstrated that it is possible to elicit rapid, nonhabituating and sustained grasp responses by means of a tactile display. Subjects grasped and lifted an instrumented test object using the thumb and index finger. While the object was held in air, rapid but small sliding movements were invoked between the object and either contact plate and caused a load force redistribution. This reliably triggered a grasp force increase similar to the ones elicited by natural slips occuring during normal manipulation. An important application of this finding is in relaying frictional information from a slave hand to a human operator. Furthermore, it may make it possible to reduce disparity between master and slave hands in force reflective telemanipulation systems.

  • 5.
    Edin, Benoni B
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology.
    Johansson, Roland S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology.
    Independent control of human finger-tip forces at individual digits during precision lifting.1992In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 450, p. 547-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Subjects lifted an object with two parallel vertical grip surfaces and a low centre of gravity using the precision grip between the tips of the thumb and index finger. The friction between the object and the digits was varied independently at each digit by changing the contact surfaces between lifts. 2. With equal frictional conditions at the two grip surfaces, the finger-tip forces were about equal at the two digits, i.e. similar vertical lifting forces and grip forces were used. With different frictions, the digit touching the most slippery surface exerted less vertical lifting force than the digit in contact with the rougher surface. Thus, the safety margins against slips were similar at the two digits whether they made contact with surfaces of similar or different friction. 3. During digital nerve block, large and variable safety margins were employed, i.e. the finger-tip forces did not reflect the surface conditions. Slips occurred more frequently than under normal conditions (14% of all trials with nerve block, <5% during normal conditions), and they only occasionally elicited compensatory adjustments of the finger-tip forces and then at prolonged latencies. 4. The partitioning of the vertical lifting force between the digits was thus dependent on digital afferent inputs and resulted from active automatic regulation and not just from the mechanics of the task. 5. The safety margin employed at a particular digit was mainly determined by the frictional conditions encountered by the digit, and to a lesser degree by the surface condition at the same digit in the previous lift (anticipatory control), but was barely influenced by the surface condition at the other digit. 6. It was concluded that the finger-tip forces were independently controlled for each digit according to a 'non-slip strategy'. The findings suggest that the force distribution among the digits represents a digit-specific lower-level neural control establishing a stable grasp. This control relies on digit-specific afferent inputs and somatosensory memory information. It is apparently subordinated to a higher-level control that is related to the total vertical lifting and normal forces required by the lifting task and the relevant physical properties of the manipulated object.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Jarocka, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Predicting incident falls: Relationship between postural sway and limits of stability in older adults2019In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 66, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously shown that objective measurements of postural sway predicts fall risk, although it is currently unknown how limits of stability (LOS) might influence these results.

    Research question: How integrated postural sway and LOS measurements predict the risk of incident falls in a population-based sample of older adults.

    Methods: The sample for this prospective observational study was drawn from the Healthy Ageing Initiative cohort and included data collected between June 2012 and December 2016 for 2396 men and women, all 70 years of age. LOS was compared to postural sway with measurements during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials, using the previously validated Wii Force Plate. Fall history was assessed during baseline examination and incident falls were collected during follow-up at 6 and 12 months. Independent predictors of incident falls and additional covariates were investigated using multiple logistic regression models.

    Results: During follow-up, 337 out of 2396 participants (14%) had experienced a fall. Unadjusted regression models from the EO trial revealed increased fall risk by 6% (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) per each centimeter squared increase in sway area and by 16% (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07–1.25) per 1-unit increase in Sway-Area-to-LOS ratio. Odds ratios were generally lower when analyzing EC trials and only slightly attenuated in fully adjusted models.

    Significance: Integrating postural sway and LOS parameters provides valid fall risk prediction and a holistic analysis of postural stability. Future work should establish normative values and evaluate clinical utility of these measures.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Increased postural sway during quiet stance as a risk factor for prospective falls in community-dwelling elderly individuals2017In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 964-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: fall-related injuries constitute major health risks in older individuals, and these risks are projected to increase in parallel with increasing human longevity. Impaired postural stability is a potential risk factor related to falls, although the evidence is inconclusive, partly due to the lack of prospective studies. This study aimed to investigate how objective measures of postural sway predict incident falls.

    Design, setting and participants: this prospectively observational study included 1,877 community-dwelling individuals aged 70 years who participated in the Healthy Ageing Initiative between June 2012 and December 2015.

    Measurements: postural sway was measured during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials using the Wii Balance Board. Functional mobility, muscle strength, objective physical activity and cognitive performance were also measured. Participants reported incident falls 6 and 12 months after the examination.

    Results: during follow-up, 255 (14%) prospective fallers were identified. Division of centre of pressure (COP) sway lengths into quintiles revealed a nonlinear distribution of falls for EO trial data, but not EC trial data. After adjustment for multiple confounders, fall risk was increased by 75% for participants with COP sway lengths ≥400 mm during the EO trial (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-2.79), and approximately doubled for sway lengths ≥920 mm during the EC trial (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.12-3.22).

    Conclusion: objective measures of postural sway independently predict incident falls in older community-dwelling men and women. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether postural sway length is of interest for the prediction of incident falls in clinical settings.

  • 8.
    Johansson, R S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Westling, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Bäckström, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Flanagan, J R
    Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.
    Eye-hand coordination in object manipulation.2001In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 21, no 17, p. 6917-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed the coordination between gaze behavior, fingertip movements, and movements of the manipulated object when subjects reached for and grasped a bar and moved it to press a target-switch. Subjects almost exclusively fixated certain landmarks critical for the control of the task. Landmarks at which contact events took place were obligatory gaze targets. These included the grasp site on the bar, the target, and the support surface where the bar was returned after target contact. Any obstacle in the direct movement path and the tip of the bar were optional landmarks. Subjects never fixated the hand or the moving bar. Gaze and hand/bar movements were linked concerning landmarks, with gaze leading. The instant that gaze exited a given landmark coincided with a kinematic event at that landmark in a manner suggesting that subjects monitored critical kinematic events for phasic verification of task progress and subgoal completion. For both the obstacle and target, subjects directed saccades and fixations to sites that were offset from the physical extension of the objects. Fixations related to an obstacle appeared to specify a location around which the extending tip of the bar should travel. We conclude that gaze supports hand movement planning by marking key positions to which the fingertips or grasped object are subsequently directed. The salience of gaze targets arises from the functional sensorimotor requirements of the task. We further suggest that gaze control contributes to the development and maintenance of sensorimotor correlation matrices that support predictive motor control in manipulation.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Roland
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Theorin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Ohki, Yukari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    How a lateralized brain supports symmetrical bimanual tasks2006In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 4, no 6, p. e158-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large repertoire of natural object manipulation tasks require precisely coupled symmetrical opposing forces by both hands on a single object. We asked how the lateralized brain handles this basic problem of spatial and temporal coordination. We show that the brain consistently appoints one of the hands as prime actor while the other assists, but the choice of acting hand is flexible. When study participants control a cursor by manipulating a tool held freely between the hands, the left hand becomes prime actor if the cursor moves directionally with the left-hand forces, whereas the right hand primarily acts if it moves with the opposing right-hand forces. In neurophysiological (electromyography, transcranial magnetic brain stimulation) and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging experiments we demonstrate that changes in hand assignment parallels a midline shift of lateralized activity in distal hand muscles, corticospinal pathways, and primary sensorimotor and cerebellar cortical areas. We conclude that the two hands can readily exchange roles as dominant actor in bimanual tasks. Spatial relationships between hand forces and goal motions determine hand assignments rather than habitual handedness. Finally, flexible role assignment of the hands is manifest at multiple levels of the motor system, from cortical regions all the way down to particular muscles.

  • 10.
    Lindgren, Lenita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Pleasant human touch is represented in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex2012In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 3427-3432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch massage (TM) is a form of pleasant touch stimulation used as treatment in clinical settings and found to improve well-being and decrease anxiety, stress, and pain. Emotional responses reported during and after TM have been studied, but the underlying mechanisms are still largely unexplored. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that the combination of human touch (i.e. skin-to-skin contact) with movement is eliciting a specific response in brain areas coding for pleasant sensations. The design included four different touch conditions; human touch with or without movement and rubber glove with or without movement. Force (2.5N) and velocity (1.5cm/s) were held constant across conditions. The pleasantness of the four different touch stimulations was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS-scale) and human touch was rated as most pleasant, particularly in combination with movement. The fMRI results revealed that TM stimulation most strongly activated the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC). These results are consistent with findings showing pgACC activation during various rewarding pleasant stimulations. This area is also known to be activated by both opioid analgesia and placebo. Together with these prior results, our finding furthers the understanding of the basis for positive TM treatment effects.

  • 11.
    McGlone, Francis
    et al.
    University of Wales, Bangor.
    Kelly, Edward F
    University of North Carolina.
    Trulsson, Mats
    Karolinska Institute.
    Francis, Susan T
    University of Nottingham.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Bowtell, Richard
    University of Nottingham.
    Functional neuroimaging studies of human somatosensory cortex2002In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 135, no 1-2, p. 147-158, PII S0166-4328(02)00144-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two studies were carried out to assess the applicability of echoplanar fMRI at 3.0 T to the analysis of somatosensory mechanisms in humans. Vibrotactile stimulation of the tips of digits two and five reliably generated significant clusters of activation in primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortex, area 43, the pre-central gyrus, posterior insula, posterior parietal cortex and posterior cingulate. Separation of these responses by digit in SI was possible in all subjects and the activation sites reflected the known lateral position of the representation of digit 2 relative to that of digit 5. A second study employed microneurographic techniques in which individual median-nerve mechanoreceptive afferents were isolated, physiologically characterized, and microstimulated in conjunction with fMRI. Hemodynamic responses, observed in every case, were robust, focal, and physiologically orderly. These techniques will enable more detailed studies of the representation of the body surface in human somatosensory cortex, the relationship of that organization to short-term plasticity in responses to natural tactile stimuli, and effects of stimulus patterning and unimodal/cross-modal attentional manipulations. They also present unique opportunities to investigate the basic physiology of the BOLD effect, and to optimize the operating characteristics of two important human functional neuroimaging modalities-high-field fMRI and high-resolution EEG-in an unusually specific and well-characterized neurophysiological setting.

  • 12.
    Trulsson, M
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Francis, S T
    University of Nottingham.
    Kelly, E F
    University of North Carolina.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Bowtell, R
    University of Nottingham.
    McGlone, F
    Port Sunlight Laboratory, Unilever Research, Wirral, University of Wales, Bangor, United Kingdom, .
    Cortical responses to single mechanoreceptive afferent microstimulation revealed with fMRI2001In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 613-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technique of intraneural microneurography/microstimulation has been used extensively to study contributions of single, physiologically characterized mechanoreceptive afferents (MRAs) to properties of somatosensory experience in awake human subjects. Its power as a tool for sensory neurophysiology can be greatly enhanced, however, by combining it with functional neuroimaging techniques that permit simultaneous measurement of the associated CNS responses. Here we report its successful adaptation to the environment of a high-field MR scanner. Eight median-nerve MRAs were isolated and characterized in three subjects and microstimulated in conjunction with fMRI at 3.0 T. Hemodynamic responses were observed in every case, and these responses were robust, focal, and physiologically orderly. The combination of fMRI with microstimulation will enable more detailed studies of the representation of the body surface in human somatosensory cortex and further studies of the relationship of that organization to short-term plasticity in the human SI cortical response to natural tactile stimuli. It can also be used to study many additional topics in sensory neurophysiology, such as CNS responses to additional classes of afferents and the effects of stimulus patterning and unimodal/crossmodal attentional manipulations. Finally, it presents unique opportunities to investigate the basic physiology of the BOLD effect and to compare the operating characteristics of fMRI and EEG as human functional neuroimaging modalities in an unusually specific and well-characterized neurophysiological setting.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf