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  • 1. Albrecht, Letusa
    et al.
    Moll, Kirsten
    Blomqvist, Karin
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Chen, Qijun
    Wahlgren, Mats
    var gene transcription and PfEMP1 expression in the rosetting and cytoadhesive Plasmodium falciparum clone FCR3S1.22011In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 10, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pathogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum is in part due to the ability of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC) to adhere to intra- vascular host cell receptors and serum-proteins. Binding of the pRBC is mediated by Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), a large multi-variant molecule encoded by a family of approximate to 60 var genes. Methods: The study of var gene transcription in the parasite clone FCR3S1.2 was performed by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of the major PfEMP1 in FCR3S1.2 pRBC was analysed with polyclonal sera in rosette disruption assays and immunofluorecence. Results: Transcripts from var1 (FCR3S1.2(var1); IT4var21) and other var genes were detected by semi-quantitative PCR but results from qPCR showed that one var gene transcript dominated over the others (FCR3S1.2var2; IT4var60). Antibodies raised in rats to the recombinant NTS-DBL1a of var2 produced in E. coli completely and dosedependently disrupted rosettes (approximate to 95% at a dilution of 1/5). The sera reacted with the Maurer's clefts in trophozoite stages (IFA) and to the infected erythrocyte surface (FACS) indicating that FCR3S1.2var2 encodes the dominant PfEMP1 expressed in this parasite. Conclusion: The major transcript in the rosetting model parasite FCR3S1.2 is FCR3S1.2var2 (IT4var60). The results suggest that this gene encodes the PfEMP1-species responsible for the rosetting phenotype of this parasite. The activity of previously raised antibodies to the NTS-DBL1a of FCR3S1.2var1 is likely due to cross-reactivity with NTS-DBL1 alpha of the var2 encoded PfEMP1.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Sven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Microbiological features distinguishing Lyme disease and relapsing fever spirochetes2018In: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, ISSN 0043-5325, E-ISSN 1613-7671, Vol. 130, no 15-16, p. 484-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent proposal of splitting the genus Borrelia into two genera in the newly formed family of Borreliaceae, i.aEuro<overline>e. Borrelia and Borreliella has motivated us to reflect upon how these organisms has been characterized and differentiated. This article therefore aims to take a closer look on the biology and virulence attributes of the two suggested genera, i.aEuro<overline>e. those causing Lyme borreliosis and relapsing fever borreliosis. Both genera have much in common with similar infection biological features. They are both characterized as bacterial zoonoses, transmitted by hematophagous arthropods with almost identical microbiological appearance. Nevertheless, a closer look at the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics clearly reveals several differences that might motivate the suggested split. On the other hand, a change of this well-established classification within the genus Borrelia might impose an economical burden as well as a great confusion in society, including medical and scientific societies as well as the general population.

  • 3.
    Elbir, Haitham
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Larsson, Pär
    Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Upreti, Mukunda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Korenberg, Edward
    Gamaleya Research Institute for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Larsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Genome Sequence of the Asiatic Species Borrelia persica2014In: Genome Announcements, ISSN 2169-8287, E-ISSN 2169-8287, Vol. 2, no 1, article id e01127-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the complete genome sequence of Borrelia persica, the causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever borreliosis on the Asian continent. Its genome of 1,784,979 bp contains 1,850 open reading frames, three ribosomal RNAs, and 32 tRNAs. One clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) was detected.

  • 4.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ngyuen, Bidong D.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Silver, Jim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bastidas, Robert J.
    Welch, Matthew D.
    Hultgren, Scott J.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Valdivia, Raphael H.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    A 2-Pyridone-Amide Inhibitor Targets the Glucose Metabolism Pathway of Chlamydia trachomatis2015In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e02304-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a screen for compounds that inhibit infectivity of the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, we identified the 2-pyridone amide KSK120. A fluorescent KSK120 analogue was synthesized and observed to be associated with the C. trachomatis surface, suggesting that its target is bacterial. We isolated KSK120-resistant strains and determined that several resistance mutations are in genes that affect the uptake and use of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6P). Consistent with an effect on G-6P metabolism, treatment with KSK120 blocked glycogen accumulation. Interestingly, KSK120 did not affect Escherichia coli or the host cell. Thus, 2-pyridone amides may represent a class of drugs that can specifically inhibit C. trachomatis infection. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial pathogen of humans that causes a common sexually transmitted disease as well as eye infections. It grows only inside cells of its host organism, within a parasitophorous vacuole termed the inclusion. Little is known, however, about what bacterial components and processes are important for C. trachomatis cellular infectivity. Here, by using a visual screen for compounds that affect bacterial distribution within the chlamydial inclusion, we identified the inhibitor KSK120. As hypothesized, the altered bacterial distribution induced by KSK120 correlated with a block in C. trachomatis infectivity. Our data suggest that the compound targets the glucose-6-phosphate (G-6P) metabolism pathway of C. trachomatis, supporting previous indications that G-6P metabolism is critical for C. trachomatis infectivity. Thus, KSK120 may be a useful tool to study chlamydial glucose metabolism and has the potential to be used in the treatment of C. trachomatis infections.

  • 5.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nguyen, Bidong D.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bastidas, Robert J.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fields, Kenneth A.
    Valdivia, Raphael H.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Mutations in hemG Mediate Resistance to Salicylidene Acylhydrazides, Demonstrating a Novel Link between Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase (HemG) and Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity2013In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 195, no 18, p. 4221-4230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicylidene acylhydrazides (SAHs) inhibit the type III secretion system (T3S) of Yersinia and other Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, SAHs restrict the growth and development of Chlamydia species. However, since the inhibition of Chlamydia growth by SAH is suppressed by the addition of excess iron and since SAHs have an iron-chelating capacity, their role as specific T3S inhibitors is unclear. We investigated here whether SAHs exhibit a function on C. trachomatis that goes beyond iron chelation. We found that the iron-saturated SAH INP0341 (IS-INP0341) specifically affects C. trachomatis infectivity with reduced generation of infectious elementary body (EB) progeny. Selection and isolation of spontaneous SAH-resistant mutant strains revealed that mutations in hemG suppressed the reduced infectivity caused by IS-INP0341 treatment. Structural modeling of C. trachomatis HemG predicts that the acquired mutations are located in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that IS-INP0341 inhibits this domain of HemG and that protoporphyrinogen oxidase (HemG) and heme metabolism are important for C. trachomatis infectivity.

  • 6.
    Nelson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Niemic, Maria Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nahrevanian, Shahab
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Malaria-enhanced Neutrophil Dependent Clearance of S. pneumoniae in an in vivo Co-infection ModelManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Normark, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nelson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Engström, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America.
    Andersson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Björk, Rafael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Maladjusted Host Immune Responses Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria-Like Pathology in a Murine Borrelia and Plasmodium Co-Infection Model2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e103295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells.

  • 8. Orikiiriza, Judy
    et al.
    Nakawesi, Jane
    Kikaire, Ben
    Turitwenka, Dorothy
    Schlech, Walter
    Kambugu, Andrew
    Lamorde, Mohammed
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Hennessy, Martina
    Musiime, Victor
    Rujumba, Joseph
    Ndeezi, Grace
    Tumwesigye, Nazarius M
    Doherty, Derek G
    Achan, Jane
    Unmet needs persist in pediatric HIV programs: lessons from selected case studies in Uganda2017In: AIDS (London), ISSN 0269-9370, E-ISSN 1473-5571, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1196-1199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Orikiiriza, Judy
    et al.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindquist, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Bonde, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Magambo, Jimmy
    Muhinda, Charles
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lipid response patterns in acute phase paediatric Plasmodium falciparum malaria2017In: Metabolomics, ISSN 1573-3882, E-ISSN 1573-3890, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several studies have observed serum lipid changes during malaria infection in humans. All of them were focused at analysis of lipoproteins, not specific lipid molecules. The aim of our study was to identify novel patterns of lipid species in malaria infected patients using lipidomics profiling, to enhance diagnosis of malaria and to evaluate biochemical pathways activated during parasite infection.

    Methods: Using a multivariate characterization approach, 60 samples were representatively selected, 20 from each category (mild, severe and controls) of the 690 study participants between age of 0.5–6 years. Lipids from patient’s plasma were extracted with chloroform/methanol mixture and subjected to lipid profiling with application of the LCMS-QTOF method.

    Results: We observed a structured plasma lipid response among the malaria-infected patients as compared to healthy controls, demonstrated by higher levels of a majority of plasma lipids with the exception of even-chain length lysophosphatidylcholines and triglycerides with lower mass and higher saturation of the fatty acid chains. An inverse lipid profile relationship was observed when plasma lipids were correlated to parasitaemia.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates how mapping the full physiological lipid response in plasma from malaria-infected individuals can be used to understand biochemical processes during infection. It also gives insights to how the levels of these molecules relate to acute immune responses.

  • 10. Reuterswärd, Philippa
    et al.
    Bergström, Sofia
    Orikiiriza, Judy
    Lindquist, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Svahn, Helene Andersson
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Ribacke, Ulf
    Nilsson, Peter
    Levels of human proteins in plasma associated with acute paediatric malaria2018In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 17, article id 426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The intimate interaction between the pathophysiology of the human host and the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite results in a wide spectrum of disease outcomes in malaria. Development of severe disease is associated with a progressively augmented imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to high parasite loads and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes. Although these phenomena collectively constitute common denominators for the wide variety of discrete severe malaria manifestations, the mechanistic rationales behind discrepancies in outcome are poorly understood. Exploration of the human pathophysiological response by variations in protein profiles in plasma presents an excellent opportunity to increase the understanding. This is ultimately required for better prediction, prevention and treatment of malaria, which is essential for ongoing elimination and eradication efforts.

    Results: An affinity proteomics approach was used to analyse 541 paediatric plasma samples collected from community controls and patients with mild or severe malaria in Rwanda. Protein profiles were generated with an antibody-based suspension bead array containing 255 antibodies targetting 115 human proteins. Here, 57 proteins were identified with significantly altered levels (adjusted p-values < 0.001) in patients with malaria compared to controls. From these, the 27 most significant proteins (adjusted p-values < 10−14) were selected for a stringent analysis approach. Here, 24 proteins showed elevated levels in malaria patients and included proteins involved in acute inflammatory response as well as cell adhesion. The remaining three proteins, also implicated in immune regulation and cellular adhesivity, displayed lower abundance in malaria patients. In addition, 37 proteins (adjusted p-values < 0.05) were identified with increased levels in patients with severe compared to mild malaria. This set includes, proteins involved in tissue remodelling and erythrocyte membrane proteins. Collectively, this approach has been successfully used to identify proteins both with known and unknown association with different stages of malaria.

    Conclusion: In this study, a high-throughput affinity proteomics approach was used to find protein profiles in plasma linked to P. falciparum infection and malaria disease progression. The proteins presented herein are mainly involved in inflammatory response, cellular adhesion and as constituents of erythrocyte membrane. These findings have a great potential to provide increased conceptual understanding of host-parasite interaction and malaria pathogenesis.

  • 11.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Orikiiriza, Judy
    Lindquist, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bonde, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Magambo, Jimmy
    Muhinda, Charles
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The oxylipin and endocannabidome responses in acute phase Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children2017In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 16, article id 358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxylipins and endocannabinoids are low molecular weight bioactive lipids that are crucial for initiation and resolution of inflammation during microbial infections. Metabolic complications in malaria are recognized contributors to severe and fatal malaria, but the impact of malaria infection on the production of small lipid derived signalling molecules is unknown. Knowledge of immunoregulatory patterns of these molecules in malaria is of great value for better understanding of the disease and improvement of treatment regimes, since the action of these classes of molecules is directly connected to the inflammatory response of the organism.

    Methods: Detection of oxylipins and endocannabinoids from plasma samples from forty children with uncomplicated and severe malaria as well as twenty controls was done after solid phase extraction followed by chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. The stable isotope dilution method was used for compound quantification. Data analysis was done with multivariate (principal component analysis (PCA), orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA (R)) and univariate approaches (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, t tests, correlation analysis).

    Results: Forty different oxylipin and thirteen endocannabinoid metabolites were detected in the studied samples, with one oxylipin (thromboxane B2, TXB2) in significantly lower levels and four endocannabinoids (OEA, PEA, DEA and EPEA) at significantly higher levels in infected individuals as compared to controls according to t test analysis with Bonferroni correction. Three oxylipins (13-HODE, 9-HODE and 13-oxo-ODE) were higher in severe compared to uncomplicated malaria cases according to the results from multivariate analysis. Observed changes in oxylipin levels can be connected to activation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathways in malaria infected individuals compared to controls, and related to increased levels of all linoleic acid oxylipins in severe patients compared to uncomplicated ones. The endocannabinoids were extremely responsive to malaria infection with majority of this class of molecules found at higher levels in infected individuals compared to controls.

    Conclusions: It was possible to detect oxylipin and endocannabinoid molecules that can be potential biomarkers for differentiation between malaria infected individuals and controls and between different classes of malaria. Metabolic pathways that could be targeted towards an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of malaria were also pinpointed.

  • 12.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Johansson, Erik
    Stenlund, Hans
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sartorius Stedim Data Analytics, Umeå, Sweden.
    Quantification of run order effect on chromatography: mass spectrometry profiling data2018In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1568, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromatographic systems coupled with mass spectrometry detection are widely used in biological studies investigating how levels of biomolecules respond to different internal and external stimuli. Such changes are normally expected to be of low magnitude and therefore all experimental factors that can influence the analysis need to be understood and minimized. Run order effect is commonly observed and constitutes a major challenge in chromatography-mass spectrometry based profiling studies that needs to be addressed before the biological evaluation of measured data is made. So far there is no established consensus, metric or method that quickly estimates the size of this effect. In this paper we demonstrate how orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS®) can be used for objective quantification of the run order effect in profiling studies. The quantification metric is expressed as the amount of variation in the experimental data that is correlated to the run order. One of the primary advantages with this approach is that it provides a fast way of quantifying run-order effect for all detected features, not only internal standards. Results obtained from quantification of run order effect as provided by the OPLS can be used in the evaluation of data normalization, support the optimization of analytical protocols and identification of compounds highly influenced by instrumental drift. The application of OPLS for quantification of run order is demonstrated on experimental data from plasma profiling performed on three analytical platforms: GCMS metabolomics, LCMS metabolomics and LCMS lipidomics.

  • 13.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Orikiiriza, Judy
    Karlsson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nelson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bonde, Mari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Kyamanwa, Patrick
    Karenzi, Ben
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. nfectious Diseases Institute, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Metabolic signature profiling as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in paediatric Plasmodium falciparum malaria2015In: Open Forum Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2328-8957, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Accuracy in malaria diagnosis and staging is vital in order to reduce mortality and post infectious sequelae. Herein we present a metabolomics approach to diagnostic staging of malaria infection, specifically Plasmodium falciparum infection in children. Methods: A group of 421 patients between six months and six years of age with mild and severe states of malaria with age-matched controls were included in the study, 107, 192 and 122 individuals respectively. A multivariate design was used as basis for representative selection of twenty patients in each category. Patient plasma was subjected to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis and a full metabolite profile was produced from each patient. In addition, a proof-of-concept model was tested in a Plasmodium berghei in-vivo model where metabolic profiles were discernible over time of infection. Results: A two-component principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the patients could be separated into disease categories according to metabolite profiles, independently of any clinical information. Furthermore, two sub-groups could be identified in the mild malaria cohort who we believe represent patients with divergent prognoses. Conclusion: Metabolite signature profiling could be used both for decision support in disease staging and prognostication.

  • 14.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sartorius Stedim Data Analytics, Tvistevägen 48, 907 36 Umeå, Sweden.
    Skotare, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sjögren, Rickard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sartorius Stedim Data Analytics, Tvistevägen 48, 907 36 Umeå, Sweden.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Orikiiriza, Judy Tatwan
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sartorius Stedim Data Analytics, Tvistevägen 48, 907 36 Umeå, Sweden.
    Joint and unique multiblock analysis of biological data: multiomics malaria study2019In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern profiling technologies enable obtaining large amounts of data which can be later used for comprehensive understanding of the studied system. Proper evaluation of such data is challenging, and cannot be faced by bare analysis of separate datasets. Integrated approaches are necessary, because only data integration allows finding correlation trends common for all studied data sets and revealing hidden structures not known a priori. This improves understanding and interpretation of the complex systems. Joint and Unique MultiBlock Analysis (JUMBA) is an analysis method based on the OnPLS-algorithm that decomposes a set of matrices into joint parts containing variation shared with other connected matrices and variation that is unique for each single matrix. Mapping unique variation is important from a data integration perspective, since it certainly cannot be expected that all variation co-varies. In this work we used JUMBA for integrated analysis of lipidomic, metabolomic and oxylipin datasets obtained from profiling of plasma samples from children infected with P. falciparum malaria. P. falciparum is one of the primary contributors to childhood mortality and obstetric complications in the developing world, what makes development of the new diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as better understanding of the disease, of utmost importance. In presented work JUMBA made it possible to detect already known trends related to disease progression, but also to discover new structures in the data connected to food intake and personal differences in metabolism. By separating the variation in each data set into joint and unique, JUMBA reduced complexity of the analysis, facilitated detection of samples and variables corresponding to specific structures across multiple datasets and by doing this enabled fast interpretation of the studied system. All this makes JUMBA a perfect choice for multiblock analysis of systems biology data.

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