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  • 1.
    Bergenheim, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Liliequist, Jonas, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ”Visa aktning för din far och din mor”: ett historiskt perspektiv på vuxna barns våld mot sina föräldrar2010In: Nordisk Tidsskrift for Kriminalvidenskab, ISSN 0029-1528, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 179-190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Foka, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Liliequist, JonasUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Laughter, humor and the (un)making of gender: historical and cultural perspectives2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A fresh look at longstanding questions, across a temporal range (classical antiquity to the early modern) and a geographical range (Asia to Europe, Islam to Christendom). The optimistic investigators find gender subversion, women's agency, and men's self-criticism in comic forms from high (Homer) to low (folklore, burlesque, jokes, cartoons), imagining a complex audience.

    Humor is the tendency of particular cognitive experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. Throughout history, it has played a crucial role in defining gender roles and identities. This collection offers an in-depth thematic examination of this relationship between humor and gender, spanning a variety of historical and cultural backdrops. Bringing together a medley of case studies diachronically and across cultures, the book examines gendered humorous expressions from classical antiquity to the late eighteenth century and across visual culture, literature and performance in both European and Asian premodern contexts.

  • 3.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    A history of emotions, 1200 - 18002012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of emotions is an expanding field of research. The essays in this collection examine emotional responses to art and music, the role of emotions in contemporary notions of gender and sexuality and theoretical questions as to their use. Bringing together a series of case studies from points across the medieval and early modern periods, the authors in this volume provide fascinating glimpses into human emotional experience across a variety of cultures.

  • 4.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Arkivet i undervisningen: eller hur man kan få studenter att intressera sig för äldre handskrivet källmaterial2003In: Scritum, ISSN 0284-3161, p. 168-175Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Bekännelsen, döden och makten.: En studie i social kontroll med utgångspunkt från tidelagsbrottet i 1600- och 1700-talets Sverige1988In: Historia Nu.: 18 Umeåforskare om det förflutna / [ed] Anders Brändström, Umeå: Forskningsrapport från Historiska institutionen vid Umeå universitet , 1988, p. 143-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Berättelsen om drottning Margaretas märke: Känsla, kön och politik i den svenska propagandan mot Danmark under 1500- och 1600-talen2018In: TEMP-tidsskrift for historie, ISSN 1904-5565, E-ISSN 1904-9587, no 16, p. 100-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the tale about the Danish queen Margareta who, during her regency of Sweden (1389-1412), was thought to have struck a coin with a mark of her female genitals to the eternal shame and ignominy of the Swedes. This tale was first told in Chronica regni Gothorum, a chronicle written by Ericus Olai in the 1470s, and was later repeated and commented on in the 16th and especially 17th centuries when the Danes were described as the hereditary foes of Sweden. The aim is to analyse the offensive meanings of the story from the analytical perspective of the history of emotions, and more precisely to examine how negative emotions like contempt, scorn and disgust were mobilized and communicated in connection with the tale. The analysis begins from a close reading of the chronicles and commentaries to uncover emotional reactions and terms to be further analysed in the broader contexts of propaganda and early modern Swedish society. A further aim is to make a critical contribution to the discussion about the role of genitals, emotions and biological sex in premodern notions of gender.

  • 7.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Between passion and lust: Framing male desire in early modern Sweden2017In: Framing Premodern Desires: Sexual Ideas, Attitudes and Practices in Europe / [ed] Satu Lidman, Meri Heinonen, Tom Linkinen, and Marjo Kaartinen, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2017, p. 211-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In distinguishing desire-as-appetite from romantic or ‘true love’, William Reddy has posited what he claims to be a unique Western conceptual dualism that first evolved during the High Middle Ages.[i] While desire-as-appetite conforms to the Christian concept of the flesh, romantic love was according to Reddy an attempt to overcome this polarization by spiritualizing and moderating sexual desire into a sublime, purified feeling of ‘true love’. Reddy’s study encompasses the period 800-1200. With the Reformation, celibacy was no longer an ideal, though the distinction between what was seen as spiritually passionate love and indiscriminate carnal desire continued to be of relevance not the least in terms of gender. The aim of this paper is to provide examples of how male sexual desire was problematized within three arenas in early modern Sweden – medical theory, the courts of justice and literary culture. It will be claimed that the early modern period saw a shift in all these arenas, toward a more pronounced understanding of male sexual desire as irrefutable and imperatively compelled to find an immediately outlet. Woman as temptress was overshadowed by the male seducer. The freer rein given to male sexual lust was however tempered by new threats from masturbation and venereal disease, both real and imagined

  • 8.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Brott, synd och straff: tidelagsbrottet i Sverige under 1600- och 1700-talet1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bestiality was one of the most severely-punished crimes in 17th and 18th century Sweden. More individuals have been executed for bestiality in Sweden than for witchcraft. The sentence for bestiality was decapitation and being burnt at the stake. Even the animals with which the sodomist had had intercourse were slaughtered and burned publicly at the place of execution. An even greater number of people were sentenced to corporal punishment and forced labour in iron collars for attempting to commit bestiality. Despite the severe penalty the number of trials increased dramatically during the first half of the 18th century, culminating sometime mid-century.

    Bestiality, together with infanticide, stood out as the most serious of contemporary Swedish social problems. The numerous trials and executions for bestiality seem to have had few if any parallels in contemporary Europe!

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconstruct, with the aid of trial records, the various cultural and symbolic significations which acts of bestiality conjured up for the society of the day, as well as to provide an explanation for the increase in the number of trials and its geographic distribution. The first section of this research assignment is inspired by the research traditions which fall under the headings of historical anthropolgy and history of mentalities. The second section is of a more traditional social- historical nature. The conflict and interaction between an elite culture in the service of authority and a folk culture with its roots in traditional customs and ways of thinking comprise a unifying and comprehensive theme in the present dissertation.

    The source material is composed of judgements and hearing reports from a total of 1,510 trials conducted during the period 1635- 1754, equivalent to the greater percentage of all the trials concerning bestiality dealt with by the district courts in Sweden at that time.

    By the middle of the 18th century the population living within the area under investigation was something more than one and one-half million souls.

    The present study shows that the bestiality trials in 17th and 18th century Sweden can be explained neither as the result of a one-sided campaign on behalf of the authorities, nor as a way in which local communities tried to get rid of inconvenient and marginalized individuals. Instead, the numerous denunciations and confessions must be seen as the result of an interaction between the desire of the authorities to exercise control and to legitimize its power, and a popular problemization of the act of bestiality itself. Three areas for problematizing have been pointed out, all of whom contributed to an increased willingness to accuse and confess: the merging of sin and crime within a framework of a justice system featuring public punishment and atonement rituals; transgression of the border between man and beast and conceptions of that which is physically impure; and a traditional job delegation between the sexes and between boys and men which led to different roles in relation to the animals. In a European perspective, the latter was perhaps the most specific to Sweden.

  • 9.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Changing discourses of marital violence in Sweden from the age of reformation to the late nineteenth century2011In: Gender and History, ISSN 0953-5233, E-ISSN 1468-0424, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how public attention to marital violence in Sweden changed from a question of maintaining good order and ambitions to discipline self-indulgent house tyrants into responsible masters of households in the seventeenth century, to the vanishing of the house tyrant as a cultural stereotype in favour of the female shrew in the eighteenth century, following the formal abolition of the husband's legal right to chastise his wife and an equalisation of liabilities and responsibilities. It also traces the beginnings of the social marginalisation and silencing of marital violence in the nineteenth century as a phenomenon associated with the lower classes and regulated by the law as a case for private action only when committed within the household circle.

  • 10.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Du skall hedra din fader och din moder på det att det må gå dig väl - konflikter mellan generationerna i 1700-talets Sverige och Finland2012In: Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson / [ed] Anders Brändström & Svante Norrhem, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 227-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coming to age marks the end of childhood, but not of being someone’s son or daughter. This was especially true in a Lutheran patriarchal society like early modern Sweden, where the fourth commandment – “honour thy father and thy mother” – was also incorporated into secular law and “fatherhood” was the main metaphor for all authority, religious and secular alike. According to this ideology, a father’s rule over his household represented the most elementary and basic order of society. This was however not always a simple matter. A household among the landed farmers in most parts of Sweden and Finland typically included a husband, wife and minor children, and often as not, paternal or maternal grandparents as well. Regardless of whether the grandparents were retired or still working and in head of the household, the adult son or daughter and his or her spouse were expected to pay the elder generation due respect. The aim of this article is to discuss how the complexity of paternal authority which was thought to be the very foundation of social order, contributed to situations of ambivalent emotions and conflicts. 

  • 11. Liliequist, Jonas
    Elisabeth (Lisbetha) Olofsdotter: Dräng, soldat, klädd i manskläder2018Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Ett bidrag till heterosexualitetens historia. Kön, sexualitet & njutningsnormer i sexhandböcker 1800-19202007In: Scandia: Tidskrift för historisk forskning, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 155-157Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    From honour to virtue: the shifting social logics of masculinityand honour in early modern Sweden2014In: Honour, violence and emotions in history / [ed] Carolyn Strange, Robert Cripp and Christopher E. Forth, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014, p. 45-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    "Fröjdeämne för helwetesfurierna".: Betraktelser över ett bildmotiv.2010In: Det åskådliga och det bottenlösa: Tankar kring konst och humaniora / [ed] Tomas Björk, Lempi Borg Wik, Peter Gillgren, Barbro Schaffer, Mårten Snickare, Anna Tellgren, Birgitta Trobrandt Åkerström, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet , 2010, p. 274-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hade djuren det bättre förr?2008In: Historisk tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 69-76Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hor, tidelag, sodomi, könsförvillelse och andra bortt enligt Bibeln: kommentar till Guds lag2015In: Sexualpolitiska nyckeltexter / [ed] Klara Arnberg, Pia Laskar, Fia Sundevall, Stockholm: Leopard förlag , 2015, p. 32-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction2012In: A History of Emotions, 1200- 1800 / [ed] Jonas Liliequist, London: Pickering & Chatto, 2012, 1, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction: A History of Emotions 1200-18002012In: A History of Emotions 1200-1800 / [ed] Jonas Liliequist, London: Pickering & Chatto, 2012, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction: Part II : Humor, laughter and the rhetoric of manhood2015In: Laughter, humor, and the (un)making of gender: historical and cultural perspectives / [ed] Anna Foka and Jonas Liliequist, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 123-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Katten på borgmästarens port: symbolik och social protest i en norrländsk stad vid 1700-talets början2012In: Från legofolk till stadsfolk: festskrift till Börje Harnesk / [ed] Erik Nydahl & Magnus Perlestam, Härnösand: Mittuniversitetet , 2012, p. 11-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Kostnadsansvar för rättegångar, fängslanden och bestraffningar i 1600- och 1700-talets Sverige1994In: Rettspraksis, no 2, p. 16-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Känslornas historia2012In: Passioner: Konst och känslor genom fem sekler / [ed] Janna Herder & Karin Sidén, Stockholm: Nationalmuseum , 2012, 1, p. 62-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Laughing at the Unmanly Man in Early Modern Sweden2015In: Laughter, humor, and the (un)making of gender: historical and cultural perspectives / [ed] Anna Foka and Jonas Liliequist, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 229-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Manlighet och socialitet: från duellernas hedersretorik till 1700- och 1800-talens vänskapskult2004In: Historiens mångfald: presentation av pågående forskning vid Institutionen för historiska studier, Umeå universitet / [ed] Ann-Katrin Hatje, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2004, Vol. 1, p. 79-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Manlighetens flytande gränser. Om manlighet som analytisk kategori i historiska analyser.2008In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 83-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Exactly what does masculinity refer to in historical analyses? And how is it to be separated from other analytical categories like class and ethnicity? The aim of this article is to discuss how the concept masculinity – ”manlighet” – has been applied in some recent historical studies by Swedish historians. Masculinity plays a central role in Christopher Collstedts doctoral thesis Justice and the duellist: Crimes of duelling and Perceptions of Masculinity in the Final Phases of Sweden’s Period as a Great power (2007). One central point in Collstedt’s study is that indicted duellists were not afraid to base their narratives of defence on behaviours, emotions and physical states of helplessness and despair which were traditionally associated with unmanliness, but on the contrary often referred to themselves as peaceful, meek and in need of protection. Collstedt links this to an early modern fluidity of masculinity and the repertoire of a Christian virtuous lifestyle, which was prescribed for both men and women. Christian virtues permitted men to be meek without giving up on their masculinity. But Collstedt also goes one step further and argues that Christian virtues like meekness were attributed to masculinity in relation to crimes of duels. How this was done is however not demonstrated by the author. The question of the historian’s criteria for labelling descriptions of attitudes and behaviour as expressions of masculinity is brought to a head. This becomes even more obvious in Kekke Stadin’s Gender and estate in Sweden’s Age of Greatness (2004). After describing several different ”masculinities” in early modern Swedish society, the author states that in the eyes of the 17th century, only ”warriors” could be manly, referring to the contemporary usage of the Swedish term ”manlig” as synonymous with brave. In the absence of a clear definition of masculinity as an analytical category, the risk is that the historian in this way will limit the analysis either to what is expressively labelled ”manly” in the source material, or expand the concept to descriptions of whatever men do and say which could be taken as normative or prestigious. A more precise definition of masculinity should start from an understanding of gender as the continuous establishment of cultural meanings for (what is recognized as) the fundamental bodily differences between the sexes in a given historical culture. Exactly what is brought forth as the essential differences and how these have been understood has varied over time, but the fact that such differences are recognized and ascribed specific qualities as masculine and feminine respectively, comprise the elementary logic of gender and thus also of masculinity. This means that the historian must be able to show that a connection (immediate or metaphorical) was made by contemporaries between a described ideal, attitude or behaviour and (what was held as) specific qualities, physical attributes and abilities of male bodies, before labelling the phenomenon as an historical expression of masculinity. The article ends with some suggestions for a rhetorical perspective on masculinity and an alternative interpretation of possible connections between excessive violence and unmanliness.

  • 26. Liliequist, Jonas
    Maria Johansdotter: Musiker klädd i manskläder2018Other (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Masculinity and Virility: representations of Male Sexuality in Eighteenth-Century Sweden2007In: Collegium : Studies across disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, ISSN 1796-2986, E-ISSN 1796-2986, Vol. 2, p. 57-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What should historians do with contrasting and contradictory accounts of male sexual practices and how should these be connected to notions of masculinity? Although the analysis of masculinity has developed sophisticated models of hierarchic and multiple masculinities, the history of sexuality has long been dominated by a phallocentric model. In this model, before the emergence of modern concepts of sexual identity in the nineteenth century, male sexual behaviour and desire were really about domination and the demonstration of social power, primarily symbolized by the active performance of penetration and the passive submission of the penetrated partner whether in hetero- or same-sex relations. The first sections of this essay deal with the relevance of this model for eighteenth-century Sweden, with reference to male self-apprehension and descriptions of male sexual practices in two secret diaries and autobiographies which, taken together, provide very different images of male sexuality. It will be argued here that the concept of virility in the sense of culturally constructed notions of bodily and sexual comportment as ultimate symbols of masculine strength and vigour could play a crucial role in connecting male sexual practices and meanings of masculinity. The essay closes with a brief suggestion of where the basis for hegemonic ideas of masculinity may be found.

  • 28.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Peasants against Nature - Crossing the Boundaries between Man and Animal in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Sweden1990In: FOOCAL Tijdschrift voor Anthropologie, no 13, p. 28-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Peasants against Nature.: Crossing the Boundaries between Man and Animal in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Sweden1991In: Journal of the history of sexuality, ISSN 1535-3605, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 393-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    ”Pigans nej, det är hennes ja. Då hon säger mest nej, då vill hon helst ha”.: Om gränsen mellan frieri, förförels och sexuellt tvång i 1600- och 1700-talens Sverige.2008In: Nätverket. Kultuforskning i Uppsala: Dåtiden i samtiden mot framtiden.Ett temanummer om kulturell ordning, makt och kön tillägnat Inger Lövkrona., ISSN 1651-0593, Vol. 15, p. 55-64Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    [Recension av: Laskar, Pia: Ett bidrag till heterosexualitetens historia]2007In: Scandia: Tidskrift för historisk forskning, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 155-157Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Royal authority and the taming of the aristocracy: the historical and political context of two paintings in the Gallery of Charles XI2016In: The gallery of Charles XI at the Royal Palace of Stockholm - in perspective / [ed] Linda Hinners, Martin Olin & Margaretha Rossholm Lagerlöf, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2016, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1680 Charles XI enforced autocratic rule after a long period of influential Chancellors like Axel Oxenstierna and shorter periods of regencies headed by members of the Council from the high aristocracy. Most remarkable, royal autocracy was enforced without meeting the least political resistance in spite of the strong tradition of aristocratic constitutionalism represented by the Council of the Realm. The ultimate triumph of royal power is portrayed most explicitly in two of the ceiling frescos in Charles XI's gallery in the Royal Palace in Stockholm. The first motif refers to the legislation against dueling and the second to the Reduction (the reclamation of crown estates granted to the nobility), both central aspects of Charles' political program, and both directed against aristocratic claims of superior exclusiveness and members of the high aristocracy in particular. Anti-dueling legislation was modeled on French absolutism, while the reduction was specifically Swedish. The aim of this article is to analyze the visual rhetoric of these two paintings in the light of a longer historical and political context.

  • 33.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Samma tankar här som där: hädelse och kätteri i 1500-talets Montereale och 1600-talets Nybyn utanför Umeå2013In: Umeå 1314-2014: 100 berättelser om 700 år / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Olsson & Susanne Haugen; Lars-Erik Edlund & Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2013, p. 341-345Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Sexual encounters with spirits and demons in early modern Sweden: popular och learned concepts in conflict and interaction2006In: Christian demonology and popular mythology: Demons, spirits, witches. Vol II / [ed] Gábor Klaniczay and Éva Pócs in collaboration with Eszter Csonka-Takács, Budapest: Central European University Press, 2006, p. 152-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sexuality and the Unnatural in Colonial Latin America, ed. by Zeb Tortorici (review)2019In: Journal of the history of sexuality, ISSN 1043-4070, E-ISSN 1535-3605, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 320-322Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    State policy, popular discourse, and the silence on homosexual acts in early modern Sweden1998In: Scandinavian homosexualities: essays on gay and lesbian studies / [ed] Jan Löfström, New York & London: Haworth Press, 1998, p. 15-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, homosexual acts between men were mentioned in secular law for the first time in 1608. Despite the explicit criminalization, very few trials are known from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the new National Law Code of 1734 contained no sanction at all. The central issue of this essay is how the insignificant number of court cases and the seemingly very limited judicial interest in the issue of sodomy in Early Modern Sweden should be interpreted. The silence of the new law is explained by a shift in the official policy from deterrence to a policy of silence, but the low number of court cases was foremost dependent on a lacking actualization and problematization of homosexual acts in the Swedish popular discourse on sexuality, gender and prestige. Finally, it is argued that this underdeveloped popular discourse probably also corresponded to a meagre and rather restricted sexual practice.

  • 37.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tears, sighs and laughter: Expressions of emotions in the middle ages2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 738-741Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    'The child who strikes his own father or mother shall be put to death': assault and verbal abuse of parents in Swedish and Finnish counties 1745-17542014In: Morality, crime and social control in Europe 1500-1900 / [ed] Olli Matikainen & Satu Lidman, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2014, p. 19-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University.
    The Political Rhetoric of Tears in Early Modern Sweden2012In: A History of Emotions, 1200- 1800 / [ed] Jonas Liliequist, London: Pickering & Chatto, 2012, 1, p. 181-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The role of the state and public opinion in the legal persecution of bestiality in 17th and 18th century Sweden: Paper presented at the 17th International Congress of Historical Sciences, Madrid August 26 - September 2, 19901990In: The role of the state and public opinion in sexual attitudes and demographic behaviour / [ed] Ad van der Woude, International Congress of Historical Sciences , 1990, p. 169-177Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    The use of court records and petitions as historical sources: introduction2012In: Früneuzeit-Info, ISSN 0940-4007, Vol. 23, no 1+2, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tidelag - ett ungdomsproblem på 1600- och 1700-talet1985In: Brå Apropå, no 3, p. 15-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tidelaget och hotet mot maskuliniteten - ett genmäle1993In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2, p. 40-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tidelagstabuet i 1600- och 1700-talets Sverige.: En forskningsansats.1985In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 3, p. 287-309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vadstena klosters godsinnehav i Östergötland västanstång enligt 1447 års jordebok1990In: I Heliga Birgittas trakter: Nitton uppsatser om medeltida samhälle och kultur i Östergötland 'västanstång' / [ed] Göran Dahlbäck, Uppsala: HSFR , 1990, p. 289-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Venus: Att inte kunna förställa sig är att inte kunna leva2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ära, dygd och manlighet. Strategier for social prestige i 1600- och 1700-talets Sverige.:  2009In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 117-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honour, virtue and manliness. Strategies for social prestige in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Sweden.

    The perspective of hegemonic masculinity has played an important role in sociological and historical analyses of male power and dominance, but the concept has also been criticised for being static, deterministic and not in phase with the recent development of feminist theories and key concepts like discourse and performativity. The influences from a more discursive perspective associated with the “cultural turn”, has at the same time been criticised for distancing the historical analysis from men’s lived experience. Cultural codes and representations have become the “real thing”, leaving men’s actual doings and feelings aside. Individual experience, subjectivity and emotions are now advocated as new key subjects for historical analyses, but what about masculinity? The question “what should historians do with masculinity” once asked by the British historian John Tosh twenty five years ago, has become more actual than ever. In this article it will be argued that a rhetorical perspective could offer a possibility for studying both cultural representations and subjective experiences. Three concepts stand in the foreground for the analysis – “honour”, “manliness” and “virtue”. It is suggested that these concepts not only represented crucial aspects of a man’s social esteem in early modern Sweden but also formed the basis for different personal and collective strategies in claiming and upholding male prestige and power. Examples will be given to show how these concepts were used, mobilized, adjusted and given slightly new meanings in social practice by different agents and for different purposes. It is further suggested that allusions to unmanliness played a central role in the social rhetoric of prestige and power. Three significant social strategies with varying outcomes will be described  – the discrediting of duels and private combats as a source of  honour and proof of manliness; the upgrading of civil virtues and industry as honourable and manly; and the condemnation of wife-beating as shameful and a failed proof of manliness.

  • 48.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Early modern court records and petitions in Sweden (c.1400-1809): overview and research trends2012In: Frühneuzeit-Info, ISSN 0940-4007, Vol. 23, no 1+2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Rudolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Orionteatern, Stockholm.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Venus: Att inte kunna förställa sig är att inte kunna leva2014Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 49 of 49
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