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  • 1. Alter, George
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Family Effects on Mortality in Nineteenth-century Northern Sweden2002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Alter, George
    et al.
    History and PIRT Indiana University Bloomingtom USA .
    Oris, Michel
    Université de Genève Département d’Histoire économique 40, boulevard du pont d’Arve CH-1211 Genève 4 Suisse.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    The family and mortality: A case study from rural Belgium2001In: Annales de Démographie Historique, ISSN 0066-2062, E-ISSN 1776-2774, Vol. 2001, p. 11-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in mortality among families give us clues about the importance of unobserved health-related behaviors. For example, if lower mortality was due to types of personal behavior learned in childhood, it should carry over to mortality at older ages. In this paper we use records from a nineteenth-century Belgian community to look at differences at mortality differences among families in two ways. First, we construct a direct measure of exposure to disease in childhood by counting the number of children in each family that died before age 15. Second, we calculate the overall effect of inter-family differences by using a "random effect" model that estimates the variance of the "family effect". Both of these measures show a strong family effect in childhood, but this effect diminishes after age 15 and disappears after age 55. Moreover, in a period still dominated by infectious diseases, those who survived diseases in childhood acquired immunities that helped them in later life.

  • 3. Alter, George
    et al.
    Oris, Michel
    Neven, Muriel
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Maternal Depletion and Mortality after the Childbearing Years in Nineteenth-Century East Belgium2002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Distinguishing time series models by impulse response-A case study of mortality and population economy1997In: Historical Methods, ISSN 0161-5440, E-ISSN 1940-1906, Vol. 30, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Effects of life-course conditions on old-age mortality in southern Sweden, 1829-18942003Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Effects of Life-Course Events on Old Age Mortality in Southern Sweden 1766-18942002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Effects of mothers on children's mortality in older ages, Southern Sweden, 1829-18942004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Centre for Economic Demography and Department of Economic History, Lund University.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Famines and mortality crises in 18th to 19th century southern Sweden2011In: Genus: Journal of Population Sciences, ISSN 2035-5556, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 119-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Causality is an important but complicated issue, not only within social sciences in general but also within economic and historical demography. Here we are dealing with two different, but related, problems of causality. The first is to what extent the impact of food prices on mortality is biased when selecting on years with mortality crises. The second concerns the problem of mixing factors that directly and indirectly have an impact on mortality. Dealing with the first problem, we compare the effects of food prices on child and adult mortality when selecting on mortality crises with a standard approach without selection. When dealing with the second problem we use the additive hazards model, in combination with dynamic path analysis, which allows for investigating the mediating effect of intermediate covariates in a causal framework. We use individual level data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database for five rural parishes for the period 1766 to 1865. Data on food prices refers to the local area of these parishes. The statistical analyses are performed in the R statistical computing environment, especially with the aid of the package eha. The main findings are that selecting on mortality crises created a large bias in the direction of overestimating the impact of food prices and that that the direct effects of food prices are dominating.

  • 9. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    How conditions in early-life and social mobility influence mortality in later life: Southern Sweden, 1829-18942003Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mortality crises in rural southern Sweden 1766-18602009In: Demographic Responses to Economic and Environmental Crises / [ed] Satomi Kurosu, Tommy Bengtsson, and Cameron Campbell, Kashiwa, Japan: IUSSP , 2009, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Old-age mortality in a life-course perspective, southern Sweden , 1829-18942006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12. Bengtsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Lindström, Martin
    Effects of Conditions in Early-Life on Old Age Mortality in Southern Sweden 1766-1894: Functional Form and Frailty2002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    A fixed effects approach to GLMs with clustered data2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    A martingale approach to the change-point problem1997In: Journal of the American Statistical Association, ISSN 0162-1459, E-ISSN 1537-274X, Vol. 92, p. 1177-1183Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    A modification of Fisher's omnibus test1998In: Communications in Statistics - Theory and Methods, ISSN 0361-0926, E-ISSN 1532-415X, Vol. 27, p. 2663-2674Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Contributions to subset selection theory1979Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Cox regression, Ties without tears2002In: Communications in Statistics: Theory and Methods, Vol. 31, p. 285-297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Event history analysis and historical demography1991In: Health and Social Change / [ed] A. Brändström and L.-G. Tedebrand, 1991, p. 15-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Event History Analysis and Historical Demography1993In: Health and Social Change: Disease, health and public care in the Sundsvall district 1750-1950 / [ed] Anders Brändström and Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 1993, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Event History Analysis with R2012Book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Generalized linear models with clustered data2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Longevity and the aging Swedish population2008In: Population Association of America: 2008 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, USA, April 17-19, 2008, p. 4-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focusing, first, on the very concept of aging, what does it mean for a population, and what does it mean to an individual. Second, on the individual level, is longevity clustered within certain families (family trees)?

  • 23.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    On optimal choice of components for parallel systems1981In: Journal of the American Statistical Association, ISSN 0162-1459, E-ISSN 1537-274X, Vol. 76, p. 486-490Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    On sequentially rejective subset selection procedures1981In: Communications in Statistics - Theory and Methods, ISSN 0361-0926, E-ISSN 1532-415X, Vol. A10, no 3, p. 203-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Practical aspects on the estimation of the parameters in Coale's model for marital fertility1985In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 22, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    The influence of mother's mortality on infant mortality, A case study in matched data survival analysis1987In: Scandinavian Journal of Statistics, ISSN 0303-6898, E-ISSN 1467-9469, Vol. 14, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Bengtsson, Tommy
    Department of Economic History, Lund University.
    Do conditions in early life affect old-age mortality directly and indirectly?: Evidence from 19th-century rural Sweden2009In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, no 9, p. 1583-1590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that the disease load experienced during the birth year, measured as the infant mortality rate, had a significant influence on old-age mortality in nineteenth-century rural Sweden. We know that children born in years with very high rates of infant mortality, due to outbreaks of smallpox or whooping cough, and who still survived to adulthood and married, faced a life length several years shorter than others. We do not know, however, whether this is a direct effect, caused by permanent physical damage leading to fatal outcomes later in life, or an indirect effect, via its influence on accumulation of wealth and obtained socio-economic status. The Scanian Demographic Database, with information on five rural parishes in southern Sweden between 1813 and 1894, contains the data needed to distinguish between the two mechanisms. First, the effects of conditions in childhood on obtained socio-economic status as an adult are analyzed, then the effects of both early-life conditions and socio-economic status at various stages of life on old-age mortality. By including random effects, we take into account possible dependencies in the data due to kinship and marriage. We find that a high disease load during the first year of life had a strong negative impact on a person's ability to acquire wealth, never before shown for a historical setting. This means that it is indeed possible that the effects of disease load in the first year of life indirectly affect mortality in old age through obtained socio-economic status. We find, however, no effects of obtained socio-economic status on old-age mortality. While the result is interesting per se, constituting a debatable issue, it means that the argument that early-life conditions indirectly affect old-age mortality is not supported. Instead, we find support for the conclusion that the effect of the disease load in early-life is direct or, in other words, that physiological damage from severe infections at the start of life leads to higher mortality at older ages. Taking random effects at family level into account did not alter this conclusion.

  • 28.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Bengtsson, Tommy
    Inheritance, Environment, and Mortality in Older Ages, Southern Sweden, 1813-18942008In: Kinship and Demographic Behavior in the Past, 2008, p. 185-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay explores the role played by the inheritance on human longevity. We estimate a model of overall mortality among married persons aged 50 years and above taking genetic as well as socioeconomic factors into account. We consider whether these factors have temporal or long-lasting effects on health. The demographic and economic individual level data come from the Scanian Demographic Database. These data cover five rural parishes in the southernmost part of Sweden for the period 1813-1894. To these, local grain prices, as an indicator of food costs, and the local infant mortality rate, as an indicator of the disease load, have been added. We find that age of death of the mother and the father have persistent impacts on their adult children's overall mortality regardless of sex, even after controlling for socioeconomic an environmental factors throughout the life course. In addition, we find strong birth cohort effects and effects of the disease load in the first year of life on male offspring. We are, however, unable to find any effects of socioeconomic status, neither at the time of birth or achieved later in life, a result consistent with earlier findings.

  • 29.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    The impact of feeding patterns on infant mortality in a nineteenth century Swedish parish1984In: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, ISSN 0142-6338, E-ISSN 1465-3664, Vol. 30, p. 154-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Lundin, Mathias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Att läsa i Umeå är ett bra val2005In: Västerbottens-Kuriren, no 9 december, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Generalized linear models with clustered data: fixed and random effects models2011In: Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, ISSN 0167-9473, E-ISSN 1872-7352, Vol. 55, no 12, p. 3123-3134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The statistical analysis of mixed effects models for binary and count data is investigated. In the statistical computing environment R, there are a few packages that estimate models of this kind. The packagelme4 is a de facto standard for mixed effects models. The packageglmmML allows non-normal distributions in the specification of random intercepts. It also allows for the estimation of a fixed effects model, assuming that all cluster intercepts are distinct fixed parameters; moreover, a bootstrapping technique is implemented to replace asymptotic analysis. The random intercepts model is fitted using a maximum likelihood estimator with adaptive Gauss–Hermite and Laplace quadrature approximations of the likelihood function. The fixed effects model is fitted through a profiling approach, which is necessary when the number of clusters is large. In a simulation study, the two approaches are compared. The fixed effects model has severe bias when the mixed effects variance is positive and the number of clusters is large.

  • 32.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Johansson, Per
    Palme, Mårten
    Economic incentives and gender differences in work absence behavior2004In: Swedish Economic Policy Review, Vol. 11, p. 33-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Partial Partial Likelihood2008In: Communications in statistics. Simulation and computation, ISSN 0361-0918, E-ISSN 1532-4141, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maximum likelihood and maximum partial likelihood approaches to the proportional hazards model are unified. The purpose is to give a general approach to the analysis of the proportional hazards model, whether the baseline distribution is absolutely continuous, discrete, or a mixture. The advantage is that heavily tied data will be analyzed with a discrete time model, while data with no ties is analyzed with ordinary Cox regression. Data sets in between are treated by a compromise between the discrete time model and Efron's approach to tied data in survival analysis, and the transitions between modes are automatic. A simulation study is conducted comparing the proposed approach to standard methods of handling ties. A recent suggestion, that revives Breslow's approach to tied data, is finally discussed.

  • 34.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Mathematical statistics.
    Acceptance-rejection sampling from the conditional distribution of independent discrete random variables, given their sum2000In: Statistics (Berlin), ISSN 0233-1888, E-ISSN 1029-4910, Vol. 34, p. 247-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Broström, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Råde, Lennart
    Further study of R-censoring and the exponential distribution1986Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Life-histories for nineteenth-century Swedish hospital patients: Chances of survival1989In: Journal of Family History, ISSN 0363-1990, E-ISSN 1552-5473, Vol. 14, p. 195-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Rogers, John
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    High risk families: The unequal distribution of infant mortality in nineteenth century Sweden2005In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Bygren, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Change in food availability during pregnancy, Is it related to adult sudden death from cerebro- and cardiovascular disease in offspring?2000In: American Journal of Human Biology, ISSN 1042-0533, E-ISSN 1520-6300, Vol. 12, p. 447-453Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: Northern Sweden 1801–2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on two regions in northern Sweden 1801–2013, we challenge common notions of the assumed advantage in survival of belonging to a high social class. The issue is analysed according to gender and age group (adults and elderly) and in relation to the developmentof economic inequality. The results show that high social class is not always favourable for survival. Men in the elite category had higher mortality compared to others during a large part of the studied period; a male mortality class reversal appears at a surprisingly late date, while the social gradient among women conforms to the expected pattern. Wesuggest that health-related behaviour is decisive not only in later but earlier phases of the mortality transition as well. The results implicate that the association between social class and health is more complex than is assumed in many of the dominant theories in demography and epidemiology.

  • 40.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Life course and long-term perspectives of social inequality in mortality among elderly and adults in Northern Sweden 1801–20132017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the development of social inequality in Swedish mortality over the life course in the elderly and adult population during the mortality transition. The study focuses on two main questions, the first relate to the long-term change in social differences in mortality. The second question is whether socio-economic position have less impact on the elderly population compared to population in working age and if the age pattern of social inequalities has changed from the 19th century to the present. Furthermore, in this study we consider possible gender-specific patterns in this process. The development of mortality in different social classes is analysed according to both total mortality and major cause-of-death categories. For the later periods, we also compare the results from the class-based analysis with other measures of social position, in this case income and education. Focus is on mortality in the Skellefteå and Umeå regions in northern Sweden 1851-2013. The study is based on the historical population data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University and modern population register data from Statistics Sweden.

  • 41.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Old age, health and social inequality: exploring the social patterns of mortality in 19th Century Northern Sweden2012In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 26, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Social position is one of the major determinants of health. Less is known about its effect in historical contexts. Previous studies have shown surprisingly small effects of social class in working age populations. Not much is known about social differences in health among the elderly in history.

    OBJECTIVE

    The present paper analyses social differences in health among the elderly (60+) in the Sundsvall region in northern Sweden during the 19th century. We investigate whether social mortality differences are particularly apparent in old age when unpropertied groups lost their most important asset for survival: their capacity to work.

    METHODS

    The data, representing 9,535 fatal events, are analysed using a Cox regression model, assuming proportional hazards.

    RESULTS

    Social class had no significant effect for women during the pre-industrial period, while only those with unknown social position had higher mortality among men. During the industrial period female mortality was lowest in the skilled working class and highest in the upper class. Social position was not significant for men in the full model. Urban mortality was 30% higher for women and 59% higher for men during the pre-industrial period compared to the peripheral parishes.

    CONCLUSIONS

    The results lead us to question the accepted 'fact' of social health differences as a historical constant. Higher social position did not lead to better survival, and social differences in mortality did not increase in old age, despite the fact that the elderly were a highly vulnerable group. Instead, the spatial aspects of mortality were important, particularly during the pre-industrial period.

  • 42.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    On statistical methods for clustering: A case study on infant mortality, northern Sweden, 1831-18902012In: Biodemography and Social Biology, ISSN 1948-5565, E-ISSN 1948-5573, Vol. 58, p. 173-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the interfamily clustering of infant mortality (defined as mortal- ity during the first year of life). We developed and evaluated statistical tools to detect clustering and a measure to quantify excess clustering for nineteenth-century data from Skellefteå, Sweden. The detection was performed using the standard methods of gener- alized linear models and logistic regression. The index of clustering was constructed by comparing the observed numbers of families with specific numbers of deaths to the cor- responding observed numbers, after correcting for explanatory variables. To the best of our knowledge, no clustering index of this kind has ever been created.

  • 43.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    On statistical methods for clustering: a case study on infant mortality, northern Sweden 1831-1890Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Högberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    The demography of maternal mortality-seven Swedish parishes in the 19th century1986In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 24, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Högberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    The impact of early medical technology on maternal mortality in late 19th century Sweden1986In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 24, p. 251-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Clustered infant mortality in an intergenerational perspective, Skellefteå 1831--18902006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Interaction between fertility and infant mortality in an intergenerational perspective2008In: ESSHC Conference in Lisbon, 26 February-1 March, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies in the past have emphasized the positive correlation between infant mortality and fertility, but how this operates remain unclear. In this paper, we investigate these interdependent processes using data from the Demographic Data base at Ume{\aa} University. More specifically, we have data from regions in the northern part of Sweden, starting in the fifteenth century and ending around the year 1900. In an earlier paper, we have studied the intergenerational aspects of infant mortality and in this paper we incorporate fertility. We investigate the interaction between the two processes and how patterns are tranferred from generation to generation.

  • 48.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Partial partial likelihood2005Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lockridge, Kenneth A.
    et al.
    Department of History, University of Michigan, USA.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
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