umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bolger, Claire
    et al.
    Tufvesson, Ellen
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Devereux, Graham
    Ayres, John
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Bjermer, Leif
    Sue-Chu, Malcolm
    Kippelen, Pascale
    Urinary cc16 levels in winter versus summer sport athletes after eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is highly prevalent in elite athletes, especially in those training in cold dry environments. Dehydration of the airways plays a key role in this process. EIB has recently been linked to airway epithelial injury in asthmatic individuals. The aim of the study is to determine whether a short period of hyperpnoea of dry air causes airway epithelial disruption in winter and/or summer sport athletes. We hypothesise that urinary level of the Clara cell protein (CC16) – an indirect marker of permeability/cellular integrity of the lung epithelial barrier – will be increased after a eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) test and that this increase will be larger in winter compared to summer athletes. Forty two female athletes – 28 summer athletes (age 31.1+/-1.7yr (SEM), training volume 9+/-1.1h/wk) and 14 winter athletes (age 21.4+/-0.8yr, training volume 12.0 ± 1.10h/wk) – took part in this study. They all performed an 8-min EVH test at a target ventilation rate of 30 times their baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). After the challenge, FEV1 was measured in duplicate at 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 and 90min. A sustained decrease in FEV1 of at least 10% from baseline was considered positive. Urine samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60 and 90min recovery. CC16 concentration was measured by enzyme immunoassay. Ten summer athletes had a positive test (max FEV1 fall = 19.6+/-2.4%), whilst eighteen of the summer athletes and all the winter athletes were negative (max FEV1 fall = 5.7+/-0.7% and 5.3+/-0.7%, respectively). CC16 increased significantly after the challenge in all three groups (P<0.01) with no difference between groups: delta CC16 (max post-EVH minus baseline) in summer EVH negative athletes was 0.241+/-0.1 ng/&#956;mol creatinine, 0.292+/-0.085 ng/&#956;mol creatinine in summer EVH positive athletes, and 0.123+/-0.047ng/&#956;mol creatinine in winter EVH negative athletes (P=0.415)In conclusion, a short period of hyperpnoea of dry air is associated with an increased rate of CC16 excretion in urine in both winter and summer athletes. This suggests that the integrity of the airway epithelium might be compromised by loss of airway surface lining fluid when athletes inhale dry air at high flow rates. This appears to occur irrespective of the degree of bronchoconstriction or regular training environment.

  • 2.
    Persson, Hampus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Asthma Control and Asthma Medication Use among Swedish Elite Endurance Athletes2018In: Canadian Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1198-2241, article id 4646852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Asthma is common in elite athletes. In this study, we examined the use of asthma medication and asthma control in endurance athletes in Sweden and compared the findings with those in a reference group of patients with asthma. Methods. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) and a questionnaire on asthma, respiratory symptoms, and medication use were posted to endurance athletes (n = 711) and the reference group of patients with asthma (n = 1026). Four hundred and sixty-nine athletes (66%) responded, of whom 141 (20%) reported physician-diagnosed asthma. In the reference group, 397 (39%) responded. Results. Seventy-seven percent of the athletes with asthma reported using asthma medication during the previous year; 39% used short/long-acting β2-agonists, 31% used inhaled corticosteroids, and 31% used both daily. According to the ACT scores, 19%, 24%, and 58% of athletes with asthma had uncontrolled, partially controlled, or well-controlled asthma, respectively. After adjustment, there was no difference in ACT scores or daily use of asthma medication between the study groups. Conclusions. Many endurance athletes had uncontrolled or partially controlled asthma, and one-third used inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists daily. Their adjusted ACT scores and use of asthma medication were similar to the values in the reference population.

  • 3.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Research & Development Unit of the Jämtland County Council (Sweden).
    Median and 5-year survival of patients with COPD stage IV: a Swedish prospective closed cohort study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective

    The prevalence of COPD stage IV has been reported to 0.1-0.2%. Little is known about the survival in COPD stage IV. The study aim was to estimate the survival of patients with COPD stage IV .

    Methods

    A cross-sectional point-prevalence study was conducted 2005 to identify and describe all patients with physician-diagnosed COPD stage IV in the city of Östersund, Sweden (Stenfors Chest 2006). These 70 patients are monitored in a prospective closed cohort study. Their emergency and elective hospital visits are registered. The subjects are invited to an yearly out-patient check-up. The time point subjects were diagnosed with stage IV-disease is identified through retrospective analysis of medical records. Medical records and death certificates are used to identify date and place of death.

    Results

    The cohort consist of 41 females and 29 males. Mean age at diagnosis of stage IV-disease was 67.6 (SD 10.7) years. The cohort had a median survival time of 8.2 years and a 5-year survival of 69% after diagnosis of COPD stage IV.

    Discussion

    Patients diagnosed with COPD stage IV have an long median survival time. The cohort has a complete follow-up, but is biased towards patients with hospital-based diagnosis of COPD stage IV and subjects were identified through hospital-based medical records. The attention patients receive taking part in a prospective study may lead to better survival.

  • 4.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hubinette, Anna
    Mid Sweden University.
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University.
    Schagatay, Erika
    Mid Sweden University.
    Spleen contraction and erythrocyte release during exercised-induced hypoxia in patients with COPD2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Liaaen, Erik Dyb
    Henriksen, Anne H.
    No difference in long term survival in patients hospitalized for pneumonic versus non-pneumonic acute exacerbations of COPD2018In: Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1752-6981, E-ISSN 1752-699X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 1305-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mooe, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The Prevalence of COPD in Individuals with Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Spirometry-Based Screening Study2015In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 453-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of COPD among individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is estimated at 5% to 18%, and COPD appears to be a predictor of poor outcome. Diagnosis of COPD has mostly been based on medical records without spirometry. As COPD is largely undiagnosed and misdiagnosed, the prevalence and clinical significance of COPD in the ACS population has not been reliably assessed. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of COPD in patients with ACS and evaluate the accuracy of medical record-based COPD diagnoses. Methods: This was a single-centre spirometry screening study for COPD in patients admitted for ACS in the county of Jämtland, Sweden. Patient medical records were reviewed to register previous medical history. Spirometry was performed prior to discharge or at the first follow-up outpatient visit after discharge. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC of <0.7 or below lower limit of normal. Results: Of 743 eligible patients, 407 performed spirometry. Five percent had COPD according to medical records; 11% and 5% fulfilled spirometric criteria of COPD according to FEV1/FVC of < 0.7 (p = 0.002) and below lower limit of normal definitions, respectively. “COPD according to medical history” had a sensitivity of 23%, specificity of 98%, positive predictive value of 53%, and negative predictive value of 91% compared with spirometric COPD FEV1/FVC of < 0.7 Conclusions: In patients with ACS, COPD is underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. We raise concerns regarding the validity of medical record-based COPD in evaluating the biological and clinical association between COPD and coronary disease. ­Clinical Trial Registration: ISRCTN number 05697808 (www.controlled-trials.com)

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf