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  • 1.
    Behrens, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Measurements in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: Computerized neuropsychological test battery and intracranial pulse waves2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (INPH) is a condition affecting gait, cognition and continence. Radiological examination reveals enlarged ventricles of the brain. A shunt that drains CSF from the ventricles to the abdomen often improves the symptoms. Much research on INPH has been focused on identifying tests that predict the outcome after shunt surgery. As part of this quest, there are attempts to find measurement methods of intracranial parameters that are valid, reliable, tolerable and safe for patients.

    Today's technologies for intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement are invasive, often requiring a burr-hole in the skull. Recently, a method for non-invasive ICP measurements was suggested: the Pulsatile Index (PI) calculated from transcranial Doppler data assessed from the middle cerebral artery. In this thesis the relation between PI and ICP was explored in INPH patients during controlled ICP regulation by lumbar infusion. The confidence interval for predicted ICP, based on measured PI was too large for the method to be of clinical utility.

    In the quest for better predictive tests for shunt success in INPH, recent studies have shown promising results with criteria based on cardiac related ICP wave amplitudes. The brain ventricular system, and the fluid surrounding the spinal cord are in contact. In this thesis it was shown that ICP waves could be measured via lumbar subarachnoid space, with a slight underestimation.

    One of the cardinal symptoms of hydrocephalus is cognitive impairment. Neuropsychological studies have demonstrated cognitive tests that are impaired and improve after shunt surgery in INPH patients. However, there is currently no standardized test battery and different studies use different tests. In response, in this thesis a fully automated computerized neuropsychological test battery was developed. The validity, reliability, responsiveness to improvement after shunt surgery and feasibility for testing INPH patients was demonstrated. It was also demonstrated that INPH patients were impaired in all subtests, compared to healthy elderly. 

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    avhandling
  • 2.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Blekinge Centre of Competence, Blekinge Hospital Karlskrona, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Smith, Cynthia
    Williams, Michael A
    Malm, Jan
    A computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2014In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 11, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A tool for standardized and repeated neuropsychological assessments in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is needed. The objective of this study was to develop a computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for INPH and to evaluate its reliability, validity and patient's ability to complete the tests.

    METHODS: Based on a structured review of the literature on neuropsychological testing in INPH, the eight tests most sensitive to the INPH cognitive profile were implemented in a computerized format. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was also included. Tests were presented on a touch-screen monitor, with animated instructions and speaker sound. The battery was evaluated with the following cohorts: A. Test-retest reliability, 44 healthy elderly; B. Validity against standard pen and pencil testing, 28 patients with various cognitive impairments; C. Ability to complete test battery, defined as completion of at least seven of the eight tests, 40 investigated for INPH.

    RESULTS: A. All except the figure copy test showed good test-retest reliability, r = 0.67-0.90; B. A high correlation was seen between conventional and computerized tests (r = 0.66-0.85) except for delayed recognition and figure copy task; C. Seventy-eight percent completed the computerized battery; Patients diagnosed with INPH (n = 26) performed worse on all tests, including depression score, compared to healthy controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: A new computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for patients with communicating hydrocephalus and INPH was introduced. Its reliability, validity for general cognitive impairment and completion rate for INPH was promising. After exclusion of the figure copy task, the battery is ready for clinical evaluation and as a next step we suggest validation for INPH and a comparison before and after shunt surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.org NCT01265251.

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  • 3.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Department of Medicine, Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Leijon, Göran
    Kristensen, Bo
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    The Computerized General Neuropsychological INPH Test revealed improvement in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus after shunt surgery2020In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 132, no 3, p. 733-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE The Computerized General Neuropsychological INPH Test (CoGNIT) provides the clinician and the researcher with standardized and accessible cognitive assessments in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH). CoGNIT includes tests of memory, executive functions, attention, manual dexterity, and psychomotor speed. Investigations of the validity and reliability of CoGNIT have been published previously. The aim of this study was to evaluate CoGNIT's sensitivity to cognitive change after shunt surgery in patients with INPH.

    METHODS Forty-one patients with INPH (median Mini-Mental State Examination score 26) were given CoGNIT preoperatively and at a postoperative follow-up 4 months after shunt surgery. Scores were compared to those of 44 healthy elderly control volunteers. CoGNIT was administered by either a nurse or an occupational therapist.

    RESULTS Improvement after shunt surgery was seen in all cognitive domains: memory (10-word list test, p < 0.01); executive functions (Stroop incongruent color and word test, p < 0.01); attention (2-choice reaction test, p < 0.01); psychomotor speed (Stroop congruent color and word test, p < 0.01); and manual dexterity (4-finger tapping, p < 0.01). No improvement was seen in the Mini-Mental State Examination score. Preoperative INPH test scores were significantly impaired compared to healthy control subjects (p < 0.001 for all tests).

    CONCLUSIONS In this study the feasibility for CoGNIT to detect a preoperative impairment and postoperative improvement in INPH was demonstrated. CoGNIT has the potential to become a valuable tool in clinical and research work.

  • 4.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lenfeldt, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Transcranial Doppler pulsatility index: not an accurate method to assess intracranial pressure.2010In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 1050-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) assessment of intracranial blood flow velocity has been suggested to accurately determine intracranial pressure (ICP). OBJECTIVE: We attempted to validate this method in patients with communicating cerebrospinal fluid systems using predetermined pressure levels. METHODS: Ten patients underwent a lumbar infusion test, applying 4 to 5 preset ICP levels. On each level, the pulsatility index (PI) in the middle cerebral artery was determined by measuring the blood flow velocity using TCD. ICP was simultaneously measured with an intraparenchymal sensor. ICP and PI were compared using correlation analysis. For further understanding of the ICP-PI relationship, a mathematical model of the intracranial dynamics was simulated using a computer. RESULTS: The ICP-PI regression equation was based on data from 8 patients. For 2 patients, no audible Doppler signal was obtained. The equation was ICP = 23*PI + 14 (R = 0.22, P < .01, N = 35). The 95% confidence interval for a mean ICP of 20 mm Hg was -3.8 to 43.8 mm Hg. Individually, the regression coefficients varied from 42 to 90 and the offsets from -32 to +3. The mathematical simulations suggest that variations in vessel compliance, autoregulation, and arterial pressure have a serious effect on the ICP-PI relationship. CONCLUSIONS: The in vivo results show that PI is not a reliable predictor of ICP. Mathematical simulations indicate that this is caused by variations in physiological parameters.

  • 5.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lenfeldt, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial Pressure and Pulsatility Index:  2011In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 69, no 4, p. E1033-E1034Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lenfeldt, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Qvarlander, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Are intracranial pressure wave amplitudes measurable through lumbar puncture?2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulsations measured in the brain correspond to those measured in lumbar space, and subsequently whether lumbar punctures could replace invasive recordings. Methods In ten patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus, simultaneous recordings of the intracranial pressure (ICP; intraparenchymal) and lumbar pressure (LP; cerebrospinal fluid pressure) were performed. During registration, pressure was altered between resting pressure and 45mmHg using an infusion test. Data were analyzed regarding pulsations (i.e., amplitudes). Also, the pressure sensors were compared in a bench test. Results The correlation between intracranial and lumbar amplitudes was 0.98. At resting pressure, and moderately elevated ICP, intracranial pulse amplitudes exceeded that of lumbar space with about 0.9mmHg. At the highest ICP, the difference changed to 0.2mmHg. The bench test showed that the agreement of sensor readings was good at resting pressure, but reduced at higher amplitudes. Conclusions Compared to intracranial registrations, amplitudes measured through lumbar puncture were slightly attenuated. The bench test showed that differences were not attributable to dissimilarities of the sensor systems. A lumbar pressure amplitude measurement is an alternative to ICP recording, but the thresholds for what should be interpreted as elevated amplitudes need to be adjusted.

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