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  • 1.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Karalija, Amar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rudolfsson, Stina Häggström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Egevad, Lars
    Granfors, Torvald
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Low levels of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor in nonmalignant and malignant prostate tissue predict favorable outcome in prostate cancer patients.2010In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1245-1255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To explore if the expression of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR) in nonmalignant and malignant prostate tissue is a potential prognostic marker for outcome in prostate cancer patients. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We used formalin-fixed tissues obtained through the transurethral resection of the prostate from 259 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer after the transurethral resection of the prostate, and patients were then followed with watchful waiting. Tissue microarrays of nonmalignant and malignant prostate tissue were stained with an antibody against pEGFR. The staining pattern was scored and related to clinicopathologic parameters and to outcome. RESULTS: Low phosphorylation of EGFR in prostate epithelial cells, both in the tumor and surprisingly also in the surrounding nonmalignant tissue, was associated with significantly longer cancer-specific survival in prostate cancer patients. This association remained significant when Gleason score and local tumor stage were added together with pEGFR to a Cox regression model. Tumor epithelial pEGFR immunoreactivity was significantly correlated to tumor cell proliferation, tumor vascular density, and nonmalignant epithelial pEGFR immunoreactivity. Patients with metastases had significantly higher immunoreactivity for tumor and nonmalignant epithelial pEGFR compared with patients without metastases. CONCLUSIONS: Low pEGFR immunoreactivity is associated with the favorable prognosis in prostate cancer patients and may provide information about which patients with Gleason score 6 and 7 tumors that will survive their disease even without treatment. Changes in the nonmalignant tissue adjacent to prostate tumors give prognostic information.

  • 2.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Winther, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Rudolfsson, Stina H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Karalija, Amar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Egevad, Lars
    Department of Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Granfors, Torvald
    Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Fowler, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    ErbB2 Receptor Immunoreactivity in Prostate Cancer: Relationship to the Androgen Receptor, Disease Severity at Diagnosis and Disease Outcome2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e105063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: ErbB2 is a member of the epidermal growth factor family of tyrosine kinases that is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and several studies have reported that a high expression of this protein has prognostic value. In the present study, we have investigated whether tumour ErbB2 immunoreactivity (ErbB2-IR) has clinically useful prognostic value, i.e. that it provides additional prognostic information to that provided by routine clinical tests (Gleason score, tumour stage).

    METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ErbB2-IR was measured in a well-characterised tissue microarray of tumour and non-malignant samples obtained at diagnosis. Additionally, mRNA levels of ErbB2-IR in the prostate were determined in the rat following manipulation of circulating androgen levels. Tumour ErbB2-IR was significantly associated with the downstream signalling molecule phosphorylated-Akt and with the cell proliferation marker Ki-67. The significant association of tumour ErbB2-IR with the Gleason score at diagnosis was lost when controlled for the association of both parameters with Ki-67. In the rat prostate, mRNA for ErbB2 was inversely associated with circulating androgen levels. There was no association between ErbB2-IR and the androgen receptor (AR)-IR in the tumours, but an interaction between the two parameters was seen with respect to their association with the tumour stage. Tumour ErbB2-IR was confirmed to be a prognostic marker for disease-specific survival, but it did not provide significant additive information to the Gleason score or to Ki-67.

    CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is concluded that tumour ErbB2-IR is of limited clinical value as a prognostic marker to aid treatment decisions, but could be of pathophysiological importance in prostate cancer.

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  • 3.
    Karalija, Amar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies following spinal cord and brachial plexus injuries2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus induce a significant inflammatory response in the nervous tissue with progressive degeneration of neurons and glial cells, and cause considerable physical and mental suffering in affected patients. This thesis investigates the effects of the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and acetyl-L- carnitine (ALC) on the survival of motoneurons in the brainstem and spinal cord, the expression of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory cell markers, axonal sprouting and glial cell reactions after spinal hemisection in adult rats. In addition, a novel MRI protocol has been developed to analyse the extent of neuronal degeneration in the spinal cord. Rubrospinal neurons and tibial motoneurons were pre-labelled with the fluorescent tracer Fast Blue one week before cervical C3 or lumbar L5 spinal cord hemisection. The intrathecal treatment with the antioxidants NAC (2.4mg/day) or ALC (0.9 mg/day) was initiated immediately after injury using Alzet2002 osmotic mini pumps. Spinal cord injury increased the expression of apoptotic cell markers BAX and caspase 3, induced significant degeneration of rubrospinal neurons and spinal motoneurons with associated decrease in immunoreactivity for microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2) in dendritic branches, synaptophysin in presynaptic boutons and neurofilaments in nerve fibers. Immunostaining for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and microglial markers OX42 and ED1 was markedly increased. Treatment with NAC and ALC attenuated levels of BAX, caspase 3, OX42 and ED1 expression after 2 weeks postoperatively. After 4-8 weeks of continuous intratheca ltreatment, NAC and ALC rescued approximately half of the rubrospinal neurons and spinal motoneurons destined to die, promoted axonal sprouting, restored the density of MAP2 and synaptophysin immunoreactivity and reduced the microglial reaction. However, antioxidant therapy did not affect the reactive astrocytes in the trauma zone. The inflammation modulating properties of ALC were also studied using cultures of human microglial cells. ALC increased the microglial production of interleukin IL-6 and BDNF, thereby possibly mediating the anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects shown in vivo. To study degeneration in the spinal cord following pre-ganglionic and post-ganglionic brachial plexus injuries, adult rat models of ventral root avulsion and peripheral nerve injury were used. A novel MRI protocol was employed and the images were compared to morphological changes found in histological preparations. Ventral root avulsion caused degeneration of dendritic branches and axonal terminals in the spinal cord, followed by significant shrinkage of the ventral horn. Extensive astroglial and microglial reactions were detected in the histological preparations. Peripheral nerve injury reduced the density of dendritic branches but did not cause shrinkage of the ventral horn. Quantitative analysis of MRI images demonstrated changes in the ventral horn following ventral root avulsion only, thus validating the developed MRI technique as a possible tool for the differentiation of pre-ganglionic and post-ganglionic nerve injuries.

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  • 4.
    Karalija, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Andersson, Magnus N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    The surgical treatment of familial cylindromatosis through subgaleal scalp excision2015In: Case reports in plastic surgery & hand surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 57-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We treated a 65-year-old woman with familial cylindromatosis, with cylindromas covering the entire scalp. Subgaleal tumor excision and split skin grafting was performed. The graft take was deemed to be excellent, with almost 100% coverage 2.5 weeks after operation, no complications and a satisfying esthetic result.

  • 5.
    Karalija, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Kelk, Peyman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Kingham, Paul J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    The effects of acetyl-­L-­carnitine treatment on neuroinflammation: An in vitro studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Karalija, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Novikova, Liudmila N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Kingham, Paul J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Novikov, Lev N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Neuroprotective Effects of N-Acetyl-Cysteine and Acetyl-L-Carnitine after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, p. e41086-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the initial acute stage of spinal cord injury, a cascade of cellular and inflammatory responses will lead to progressive secondary damage of the nerve tissue surrounding the primary injury site. The degeneration is manifested by loss of neurons and glial cells, demyelination and cyst formation. Injury to the mammalian spinal cord results in nearly complete failure of the severed axons to regenerate. We have previously demonstrated that the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) can attenuate retrograde neuronal degeneration after peripheral nerve and ventral root injury. The present study evaluates the effects of NAC and ALC on neuronal survival, axonal sprouting and glial cell reactions after spinal cord injury in adult rats. Tibial motoneurons in the spinal cord were pre-labeled with fluorescent tracer Fast Blue one week before lumbar L5 hemisection. Continuous intrathecal infusion of NAC (2.4 mg/day) or ALC (0.9 mg/day) was initiated immediately after spinal injury using Alzet 2002 osmotic minipumps. Neuroprotective effects of treatment were assessed by counting surviving motoneurons and by using quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blotting for neuronal and glial cell markers 4 weeks after hemisection. Spinal cord injury induced significant loss of tibial motoneurons in L4-L6 segments. Neuronal degeneration was associated with decreased immunostaining for microtubular-associated protein-2 (MAP2) in dendritic branches, synaptophysin in presynaptic boutons and neurofilaments in nerve fibers. Immunostaining for the astroglial marker GFAP and microglial marker OX42 was increased. Treatment with NAC and ALC rescued approximately half of the motoneurons destined to die. In addition, antioxidants restored MAP2 and synaptophysin immunoreactivity. However, the perineuronal synaptophysin labeling was not recovered. Although both treatments promoted axonal sprouting, there was no effect on reactive astrocytes. In contrast, the microglial reaction was significantly attenuated. The results indicate a therapeutic potential for NAC and ALC in the early treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury.

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  • 7.
    Karalija, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Novikova, Liudmila N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Novikov, Lev N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Differentiation of pre- and postganglionic nerve injury using MRI of the spinal cord2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) is a devastating type of nerve injury, potentially causing loss of motor and sensory function. Principally, BPI is either categorized as preganglionic or post- ganglionic, with the early establishment of injury level being crucial for choosing the correct treatment strategy. Despite diagnostic advances, the need for a reliable, non-invasive method for establishing the injury level remains. We studied the usefulness of in vivo mag- netic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spinal cord for determination of injury level. The find- ings were related to neuronal and glial changes. Rats underwent unilateral L4 & L5 ventral roots avulsion or sciatic nerve axotomy. The injuries served as models for pre- and postgan- glionic BPI, respectively. MRI of the L4/L5 spinal cord segments 4 weeks after avulsion showed ventral horn (VH) shrinkage on the injured side compared to the uninjured side. Axotomy induced no change in the VH size on MRI. Following avulsion, histological sections of L4/L5 revealed shrinkage in the VH grey matter area occupied by NeuN-positive neurons, loss of microtubular-associated protein-2 positive dendritic branches (MAP2), pan-neurofila- ment positive axons (PanNF), synaptophysin-positive synapses (SYN) and increase in immunoreactivity for the microglial OX42 and astroglial GFAP markers. Axotomy induced no changes in NeuN-reactivity, modest decrease of MAP2 immunoreactivity, no changes in SYN and PanNF labelling, and a modest increase in OX42 and SYN labeling. Histological and radiological findings were congruent when assessing changes after axotomy, while MRI somewhat underestimated the shrinkage. This study indicates a potential diagnostic value of structural spinal cord MRI following BPI. 

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  • 8.
    Karalija, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Novikova, Ludmila N
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Kingham, Paul J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Novikov, Lev N
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    The effects of N-acetyl-cysteine and acetyl-l-carnitine on neural survival, neuroinflammation and regeneration following spinal cord injury2014In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 269, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic spinal cord injury induces a long-standing inflammatory response in the spinal cord tissue, leading to a progressive apoptotic death of spinal cord neurons and glial cells. We have recently demonstrated that immediate treatment with the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) attenuates neuroinflammation, induces axonal sprouting, and reduces the death of motoneurons in the vicinity of the trauma zone 4weeks after initial trauma. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of long-term antioxidant treatment on the survival of descending rubrospinal neurons after spinal cord injury in rats. It also examines the short- and long-term effects of treatment on apoptosis, inflammation, and regeneration in the spinal cord trauma zone. Spinal cord hemisection performed at the level C3 induced a significant loss of rubrospinal neurons 8weeks after injury. At 2weeks, an increase in the expression of the apoptosis-associated markers BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX) and caspase 3, as well as the microglial cell markers OX42 and ectodermal dysplasia 1 (ED1), was seen in the trauma zone. After 8weeks, an increase in immunostaining for OX42 and the serotonin marker 5HT was detected in the same area. Antioxidant therapy reduced the loss of rubrospinal neurons by approximately 50%. Treatment also decreased the expression of BAX, caspase 3, OX42 and ED1 after 2weeks. After 8weeks, treatment decreased immunoreactivity for OX42, whereas it was increased for 5HT. In conclusion, this study provides further insight in the effects of treatment with NAC and ALC on descending pathways, as well as short- and long-term effects on the spinal cord trauma zone.

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