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  • 1.
    Bouzarovski, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham.
    Salukvadze, Joseph
    Department of Human Geography, Tbilisi State University, Faculty of Social and Political Studies.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A socially resilient urban transition?: The contested landscapes of apartment building extensions in two post-communist cities2011In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 48, no 13, p. 2689-2714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though social processes across the globe are increasingly being theorised through a resilience lens, this has rarely been the case within the domain of everyday life in the city. The resilience debate also remains highly geographically selective, as regions that have undergone far-reaching systemic change over the past 20 years-including the post-communist states of the former Soviet Union and eastern and central Europe (ECE)-generally remain omitted from it. In order to address such knowledge gaps, an investigation is made of the relationships between social resilience and micro-level socio-spatial change in the built environment of the post-communist city, by focusing on the institutional, spatial and economic underpinnings of apartment building extensions (ABEs) on multistorey residential buildings in the Macedonian capital of Skopje and the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Both cities contain a wide variety of ABEs, whose reinforced concrete frame constructions often rival the host buildings in terms of size and function. By exploring the architectural and social landscapes created by the extensions, it is hoped to highlight their embeddedness in a set of policy decisions and coping strategies, as well as their controversial implications on the present and future use of urban space.

  • 2.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Mass privatisation, unemployment and mortality2012In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 785-787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Meeting the 'organs': the tacit dilemma of field research in authoritarian states2013In: Area (London 1969), ISSN 0004-0894, E-ISSN 1475-4762, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 426-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To the regret of many scholars, science and politics often overlap, and nowhere as clearly as inside countries ruled by authoritarian governments, where research tends to attract the surveillance of repressive authorities and, more specifically, of the secret services (known as the organ' within post-communist space). While such surveillance places significant ethical and methodological challenges on field research, it is rarely discussed in the literature. This paper discusses what may happen when the organ takes interest in fieldwork. Based on the author's experiences in a range of post-communist countries, the aim is to present and discuss the related risks, and to show how these may materialise in relation to the organ's (c)overt activities.

  • 4.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Slum, knark och modernism i Neapel: den permanenta eklipsen över Scampia2011In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Marcinczak, Szymon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    No more work for Stakhanov: migrants and stayers in the depopulating Donbas, Ukraine2012In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 401-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labor migration from the less to the more affluent cities and regions is a defining trait of the patterns of population redistribution in Central and Eastern Europe, especially in the former Soviet Union, where international disparities in income and living standards are particularly manifest. While these macro-trends are well portrayed in the literature, their outcome at the household level seldom figures in the literature. In Ukraine, labor out-migration to Russia is a frequently chosen strategy, not least because of the Russophone background of eastern Ukraine and of many of the major cities, including Kiev and Odessa. This out-migration contributes to urban decline. Using multivariate methods, we analyze the characteristics of population subgroups with and without the experience of working abroad. We also use descriptive statistics to assess the impact of migration events within households on the standard of living of the latter. Our data source is the city of Stakhanov Health Interview Survey 2009 (n = 3,000).

  • 6.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Södertörns högskola.
    Sjöberg, Örjan
    Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited2013In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social or public housing is an important component of the housing supply in most European countries. Nowhere, however, has the notion of social housing been taken as far as in the countries that formerly were ruled by socialist regimes, most notably the Soviet Union. For this reason, it may be argued that the development of theorizations on housing has much to learn from this large but inconclusively studied example. One of the avowed virtues of socialism was that the system, in theory, guaranteed its subjects equal rights to housing. That this was not quite the case is well known in the literature, but in fact no robust evidence to support this view (or the contrary) has been presented so far. Therefore, this paper's aim is to investigate the functioning of the Soviet system of housing allocation, assessing its claims to social equity and justice. Based on a detailed case study of about 3500 Soviet-era housing allocation decisions made in Daugavpils, Latvia, at five points in time covering various stages in the development of Soviet power (full coverage of decisions made in 1953, 1960, 1970, 1980, and January-April 1990), we illustrate how much living space was allocated to whom. In addition, we detail the characteristics of the waiting times involved. We apply both descriptive and regression methods on our data-set, making a significant contribution to what is known about the outcome of housing allocation under socialism and, at a more general level, under strictly supply-constrained conditions.

  • 7.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sjöberg, Örjan
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Soviet housing: Who built what and when? The case of Daugavpils,Latvia2010In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 453-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout much of the Soviet period, access to housing was a major consideration, both for individual citizens and employers intent on increasing their number of employees. Because of the heavy emphasis on industry, and despite the progress made within the area since the late 1950s, Soviet urban residential provision never managed to fully recover from the acute housing shortage that characterized the Stalin years. In this paper, we address the quantitative side of housing construction during the socialist era. Using the mid-sized diversified industrial town of Daugavpils (Latvia) as a case study, we set out to investigate the extent to which employers were involved in decisions concerning housing provision. To do this, we consult a large volume of archival records, our focus being on documents tracing entries indicating that new living quarters were ready and could be allocated to employees of sponsoring organizations and enterprises.

  • 8.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sjöberg, Örjan
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Spaces of priority: the geography of Soviet housing construction in Daugavpils, Latvia2010In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, ISSN 0004-5608, E-ISSN 1467-8306, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 112-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Tammaru, Tiit
    van Kempen, Ronald
    Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities2012In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 291-299Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Marcinczak, Szymon
    et al.
    Institute of Urban Geography and Tourism Studies, University of Łódź.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Rufat, Samuel
    Chelcea, Liviu
    Urban Geographies of Hesitant Transition: Tracing Socioeconomic Segregation in Post-Ceausescu Bucharest2014In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 1399-1417Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have raised concerns about the social costs of the transition from state socialism to capitalism in Central and Eastern Europe, and geographers are particularly interested in the spatial expressions and implications of these costs, including apparently increasing residential segregation. Applying a range of segregation measures to 1992 and 2002 census data, this contribution studies socio-occupational residential segregation in Bucharest. The conclusion is that Bucharest was relatively socio-spatially mixed at both times; in fact, a modest, yet fully legible, decreasing overall trend is observable. This is at odds with many popular assumptions of the past 20 years.

  • 11.
    Marcinczak, Szymon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. University of Lodz.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Univ Flemingsberg, SCOHOST Södertorn, Flemingsberg.
    Stepniak, Marcin
    Paradoxes of (post)socialist segregation: metropolitan sociospatial divisions under and after socialism in Poland2013In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 327-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The state of the art in research on residential segregation and concentration in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) largely focuses on process description (e.g., the multitude of works on gentrification and suburbanization). Even though major advances in the conceptualization and measurement of segregation have been made, works that scrutinize the patterns of segregation and/or concentration in CEE are rare, while studies that simultaneously explore and link segregation patterns under socialism and after are virtually nonexistent. Relying on Polish census-tract level data on the educational structure of population in 1978, 1988, and 2002, this study explores the patterns of social segregation and concentration in the three major Polish cities (Warsaw, Cracow, and od), representing different paths of development under socialism and after. The results show that the population of the three major Polish cities was still socially heterogeneous at the census tract level in 2002. The results also reveal that the level of social residential segregation in the three cities has been decreasing steadily since 1978, irrespective of the prevailing economic system

  • 12. O´Hara, S.
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Household Incomes in Post-Soviet Central Asia: The Case of Kazakhstan2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 327-347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. O´Hara, S
    et al.
    Ivlevs, A
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The impact of global economic crisis on remittances in the commonwealth of independent states2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 447-463Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Petrova, Sashka
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Södertörn University, SE-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Bouzarovski, Stefan
    Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the micro-geographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1240-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing recognition of the importance of indoor environments as 'active political-ecological spaces' has rarely been followed up by a systematic empirical engagement with the constituent dynamics and conceptual issues associated with infrastructural deprivation in this domain, particularly in non-Western contexts. Therefore, we investigate the relationship between self-reported perceptions of thermal comfort in the home, on the one hand, and a range of sociodemographic, housing, and health-related variables, on the other, via a quantitative analysis of a large-scale survey undertaken in the Eastern Ukrainian town of Stakhanov. Using the perceived level of thermal comfort as a starting point for its empirical explorations, we estimate the number and type of households who feel that they are receiving inadequate energy services in the home. Special attention is paid to the role of buildings in shaping the perceptions of thermal comfort.

  • 15. Rafiqui, P.
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Vientiane (Laos) City Profile2009In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Stjernström, Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Michael, GentileUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Geografiska Notiser:  tema geografi i Umeå2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 17. Tammaru, Tiit
    et al.
    van Kempen, RonaldGentile, MichaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
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