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  • 1.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    "In general, how do you feel today?" Self-rated health in the context of aging in India.2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Most aging research comes from the developed world. Aging research in India is focused on disease states and risk factors. Evidence on elderly health, physical performance and disability to understand the psycho-social or socio-behavioral risk is limited in India. Self-rated health (SRH) is used often in survey settings to quickly assess health status and is known to predict morbidity and mortality. The first wave of the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) survey provides an opportunity to explore the complex construct of SRH in the context of the aging process in its various key life domains of health, disability, cognition, activities of daily life, work, family, security and well-being in low and middle income settings.

    Objectives This research aims to (a) understand pathways through which the social environment, functional disability, health behaviour and chronic disease experience influence SRH, (b) examine the role of SRH in predicting mortality, (c) validate SRH to improve its interpersonal comparability, and (d) assess how well estimates of SRH derived directly from a ‘small area’ survey compare with ‘small area’ estimates derived indirectly from a ‘large area’ survey.

    Methods The Vadu Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) monitor health and demographic trends in a rural population of more than 100 000 in 22 villages in India since 2002. The full and short version of the SAGE survey was implemented in Vadu in 2007-09 among 321 and 5432 individuals aged 50 years and above, respectively. A structural equation model tested pathways through which social and biological factors influenced SRH. A Cox proportional hazard model examined the role of SRH as a predictor for mortality. Anchoring vignettes were used to evaluate SRH for reporting heterogeneity. The Hierarchical Ordered Probit model adjusted SRH for reporting heterogeneity. The SRH prevalence estimates for Vadu derived indirectly (indirect synthetic estimate, empirical Bayes estimate, Hierarchical Bayes estimate) from the national SAGE survey were compared with estimates derived directly from the Vadu SAGE survey, using different design and model-based techniques.

    Results Older individuals reported poor SRH compared to those younger. Women rated their quality of life and SRH poorer than men. The effect of age on SRH was mediated through functional disability. Higher socioeconomic status and higher quality of life was in turn associated with better SRH but this relationship lacked statistical significance. Smoking or consumption of tobacco was associated with at least one chronic illness which in turn was associated with poor SRH and quality of life. However the association between chronic illness and SRH and quality of life was not statistically significant. Mortality risk was higher among individuals who reported bad/very bad SRH, disability and lack of spousal support independent of age and sex. There was strong evidence of reporting heterogeneity in SRH that was influenced by age, sex, education and socioeconomic status. The prevalence of ‘good / very good’ SRH was estimated to be 50%. This direct survey estimate compared well with the prevalence estimate of about 45% derived indirectly from model-based small area estimation methods. The indirect synthetic estimate for Vadu (23.2%) was a poor approximation to the direct survey or modelbased estimate.

    Conclusion This research establishes the value and utility of SRH as a simple measure of health and predictor of mortality in an aging context. It provides evidence to formulate programs and policies towards an enabling social environment and an ability to function in key life domains of health and well-being. It highlights the need to identify and adjust self-rated responses for interpersonal incomparability prior to making comparisons across individuals or groups of individuals. It highlights the potential of using information from large national surveys by district level managers for planning and evaluation of policies and programs at the district or sub-district level. Finally, this research provides the basis for integrating SRH and related questions into routine HDSS.

  • 2.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gomez-Olive, Xavier
    Oti, Samuel
    Debpuur, Cornelius
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Tollman, Stephen
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Use of anchoring vignettes to evaluate health reporting behavior amongst adults aged 50 years and above in Africa and Asia: testing assumptions2013In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparing self-rating health responses across individuals and cultures is misleading due to different reporting behaviors. Anchoring vignettes is a technique that allows identifying and adjusting self-rating responses for reporting heterogeneity (RH). Objective: This article aims to test two crucial assumptions of vignette equivalence (VE) and response consistency (RC) that are required to be met before vignettes can be used to adjust self-rating responses for RH. Design: We used self-ratings, vignettes, and objective measures covering domains of mobility and cognition from the WHO study on global AGEing and adult health, administered to older adults aged 50 years and above from eight low-and middle-income countries in Africa and Asia. For VE, we specified a hierarchical ordered probit (HOPIT) model to test for equality of perceived vignette locations. For RC, we tested for equality of thresholds that are used to rate vignettes with thresholds derived from objective measures and used to rate their own health function. Results: There was evidence of RH in self-rating responses for difficulty in mobility and cognition. Assumptions of VE and RC between countries were violated driven by age, sex, and education. However, within a country context, assumption of VE was met in some countries (mainly in Africa, except Tanzania) and violated in others (mainly in Asia, except India). Conclusion: We conclude that violation of assumptions of RC and VE precluded the use of anchoring vignettes to adjust self-rated responses for RH across countries in Asia and Africa.

  • 3.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
    Sambhudas, Somnath
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
    Lele, Pallavi
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Berkman, Lisa
    3 Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Tollman, Steve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Does self-rated health predict death in adults aged 50 years and above in India? Evidence from a rural population under health and demographic surveillance.2012In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1719-1727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) aims to improve empirical understanding of health and well-being of adults in developing countries. We examine the role of self-rated health (SRH) in predicting mortality and assess how socio-demographic and other disability measures influence this association.

    Methods In 2007, a shortened SAGE questionnaire was administered to 5087 adults aged >= 50 years under the Health Demographic Surveillance System in rural Pune district, India. Respondents rated their own health with a single global question on SRH. Disability and well-being were assessed using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Index, Health State Score and quality-of-life score. Respondents were followed up every 6 months till June 2011. Any change in spousal support, migration or death during follow-up was updated in the SAGE dataset.

    Results In all, 410 respondents (8%) died in the 3-year follow-up period. Mortality risk was higher with bad/very bad SRH [hazard ratio (HR) in men: 3.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-4.87; HR in women: 1.64, 95% CI: 0.94-2.86], independent of age, disability and other covariates. Disability measure (WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Index) and absence of spousal support were also associated with increased mortality risk.

    Conclusion Our findings confirm an association between bad/very bad SRH and mortality for men, independent of age, socio-demographic factors and other disability measures, in a rural Indian population. This association loses significance in women when adjusted for disability. Our study highlights the strength of nesting cross-sectional surveys within the context of the Health Demographic Surveillance System in studying the role of SRH and mortality.

  • 4.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Center, Pune, India .
    Oud, JH
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sambhudas, Somnath
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Center, Pune, India .
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Center, Pune, India.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Health and Population Division, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Unpacking self-rated health and quality of life in older adults and elderly in India: a structural equation modelling approach2014In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 105-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims at improving empirical understanding of the health and well-being of older adults in low- and middle-income countries. A total of 321 adults aged 50 years and older were interviewed in rural Pune district, India, in 2007. We used Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to examine the pathways through which social factors, functional disability, risk behaviours, and chronic disease experience influence self-rated health (SRH) and quality of life (QOL) amongst older adults in India. Both SRH and QOL worsened with increased age (indirect effect) and limitations in functional ability (direct effect). QOL, socio-economic status (SES), and social networking had no significant effect on SRH. Smoking was associated with the presence of at least one chronic illness, but this did not have a statistically significant effect on SRH. Higher social networking was seen amongst the better educated and those with regular income, which in turn positively affected the QOL rating. QOL had a direct, but statistically not significant, effect on SRH. In conclusion, the indirect effects of age on SRH mediated through functional ability, and the effects of SES on QOL mediated through social networking, provide new understanding of how age and socio-economic status affect SRH and QOL. By allowing for measurement errors, solving for collinearity in predictor variables by integrating them into measurement models, and specifying causal dependencies between the underlying latent constructs, SEM provides a strong link between theory and empirics.

  • 5.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Verdes, E
    Lele, P
    Juvekar, S
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Chatterjee, S
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Evaluating reporting heterogeneity in self-rating health responses amongst adults aged 50 years and above in India: an anchoring vignettes analytic approachIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. KEM Hosp Res Ctr, Pune 411011, Maharashtra, India.
    Verdes, Emese
    WHO, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lele, Pallavi
    KEM Hosp Res Ctr, Pune 411011, Maharashtra, India.
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    KEM Hosp Res Ctr, Pune 411011, Maharashtra, India.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tollman, Steve
    University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    WHO, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Evaluating Reporting Heterogeneity in Self-Rated Health Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Above in India: An Anchoring Vignettes Analytic Approach2014In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1015-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To use anchoring vignettes to evaluate reporting heterogeneity (RH) in self-rated mobility and cognition in older adults. Method: We analyzed vignettes and self-rated mobility and cognition in 2,558 individuals aged 50 years and above. We tested for assumptions of vignette equivalence (VE) and response consistency (RC). We used a joint hierarchical ordered probit (HOPIT) model to evaluate self-rating responses for RH. Results: The assumption of VE was met except for "learning" vignettes. Higher socioeconomic status (SES) and education significantly lowered thresholds for cognition ratings. After correction for RH, women, lower SES, and older respondents were significantly more likely to report greater difficulty in mobility. The influence of age, SES, and education on thresholds was less apparent for cognition. Discussion: Our study provides strong evidence of RH in self-rated mobility and cognition. We highlight the need to formally test basic assumptions before using vignettes to adjust self-rating responses for RH.

  • 7.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Vounatsou, Penelope
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Self-rated health: small area large area comparisons amongst older adults at the state, district and sub-district level in India2014In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 26C, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared prevalence estimates of self-rated health (SRH) derived indirectly using four different small area estimation methods for the Vadu (small) area from the national Study on Global AGEing (SAGE) survey with estimates derived directly from the Vadu SAGE survey. The indirect synthetic estimate for Vadu was 24% whereas the model based estimates were 45.6% and 45.7% with smaller prediction errors and comparable to the direct survey estimate of 50%. The model based techniques were better suited to estimate the prevalence of SRH than the indirect synthetic method. We conclude that a simplified mixed effects regression model can produce valid small area estimates of SRH.

  • 8. Huda, M Mamun
    et al.
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Siddiqui, Niyamat Ali
    Malaviya, Paritosh
    Banjara, Megha Raj
    Das, Pradeep
    Kansal, Sangeeta
    Gurung, Chitra Kumar
    Naznin, Eva
    Rijal, Suman
    Arana, Byron
    Kroeger, Axel
    Mondal, Dinesh
    Active case detection in national visceral leishmaniasis elimination programs in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal: feasibility, performance and costs2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, p. 1001-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Active case detection (ACD) significantly contributes to early detection and treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) cases and is cost effective. This paper evaluates the performance and feasibility of adapting ACD strategies into national programs for VL elimination in Bangladesh, India and Nepal.

    Methods: The camp search and index case search strategies were piloted in 2010-11 by national programs in high and moderate endemic districts / sub-districts respectively. Researchers independently assessed the performance and feasibility of these strategies through direct observation of activities and review of records. Program costs were estimated using an ingredients costing method.

    Results: Altogether 48 camps (Bangladesh-27, India-19, Nepal-2) and 81 index case searches (India-36, Nepal-45) were conducted by the health services across 50 health center areas (Bangladesh-4 Upazillas, India-9 PHCs, Nepal-37 VDCs). The mean number of new case detected per camp was 1.3 and it varied from 0.32 in India to 2.0 in Bangladesh. The cost (excluding training costs) of detecting one new VL case per camp varied from USD 22 in Bangladesh, USD 199 in Nepal to USD 320 in India. The camp search strategy detected a substantive number of new PKDL cases. The major challenges faced by the programs were inadequate preparation, time and resources spent on promoting camp awareness through IEC activities in the community. Incorrectly diagnosed splenic enlargement at camps probably due to poor clinical examination skills resulted in a high proportion of patients being subjected to rK39 testing.

    Conclusion: National programs can adapt ACD strategies for detection of new VL/PKDL cases. However adequate time and resources are required for training, planning and strengthening referral services to overcome challenges faced by the programs in conducting ACD.

  • 9. Kowal, Paul
    et al.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Naidoo, Nirmala
    Biritwum, Richard
    Fan, Wu
    Lopez Ridaura, Ruy
    Maximova, Tamara
    Arokiasamy, Perianayagam
    Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy
    Williams, Sharon
    Snodgrass, J Josh
    Minicuci, Nadia
    D'Este, Catherine
    Peltzer, Karl
    Boerma, J Ties
    Yawson, A
    Mensah, G
    Yong, J
    Guo, Y
    Zheng, Y
    Parasuraman, P
    Lhungdim, H
    Sekher, TV
    Rosa, R
    Belov, VB
    Lushkina, NP
    Peltzer, K
    Makiwane, M
    Zuma, K
    Ramlagan, S
    Davids, A
    Mbelle, N
    Matseke, G
    Schneider, M
    Tabane, C
    Tollman, Stephen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kahn, Kathy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Juvekar, S
    Sankoh, O
    Debpuur, CY
    Nguyen, TK Chuc
    Gomez-Olive, FX
    Hakimi, M
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    Abdullah, S
    Hodgson, A
    Kyobutungi, C
    Egondi, T
    Mayombana, C
    Minh, HV
    Mwanyangala, MA
    Razzaque, A
    Wilopo, S
    Streatfield, PK
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Scholten, F
    Mugisha, J
    Seeley, J
    Kinyanda, E
    Nyirenda, M
    Mutevedzi, P
    Newell, M-L
    Data resource profile: the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)2012In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1639-1649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Population ageing is rapidly becoming a global issue and will have a major impact on health policies and programmes. The World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims to address the gap in reliable data and scientific knowledge on ageing and health in low- and middle-income countries. SAGE is a longitudinal study with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50+ years in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, with a smaller sample of adults aged 18-49 years in each country for comparisons. Instruments are compatible with other large high-income country longitudinal ageing studies. Wave 1 was conducted during 2007-2010 and included a total of 34 124 respondents aged 50+ and 8340 aged 18-49. In four countries, a subsample consisting of 8160 respondents participated in Wave 1 and the 2002/04 World Health Survey (referred to as SAGE Wave 0). Wave 2 data collection will start in 2012/13, following up all Wave 1 respondents. Wave 3 is planned for 2014/15. SAGE is committed to the public release of study instruments, protocols and meta- and micro-data: access is provided upon completion of a Users Agreement available through WHO's SAGE website (www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sage) and WHO's archive using the National Data Archive application (http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata).

  • 10. Kowal, Paul
    et al.
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre for Global Health Research Umeå, MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa and INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre for Global Health Research Umeå, INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana and Purworejo HDSS, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Naidoo, Nirmala
    Abdullah, Salim
    Bawah, Ayaga
    Binka, Fred
    Chuc, Nguyen T K
    Debpuur, Cornelius
    Ezeh, Alex
    Xavier Gómez-Olivé, F
    Hakimi, Mohammad
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    Hodgson, Abraham
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Kyobutungi, Catherine
    Menken, Jane
    Van Minh, Hoang
    Mwanyangala, Mathew A
    Razzaque, Abdur
    Sankoh, Osman
    Kim Streatfield, P
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre for Global Health Research Umeå.
    Wilopo, Siswanto
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre for Global Health Research Umeå.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Tollman, Stephen M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Centre for Global Health Research Umeå, MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa and INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana.
    Ageing and adult health status in eight lower-income countries: the INDEPTH WHO-SAGE collaboration2010In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 3, no Supplement 2, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, ageing impacts all countries, with a majority of older persons residing in lower- and middle-income countries now and into the future. An understanding of the health and well-being of these ageing populations is important for policy and planning; however, research on ageing and adult health that informs policy predominantly comes from higher-income countries. A collaboration between the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) and International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in developing countries (INDEPTH), with support from the US National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS), has resulted in valuable health, disability and well-being information through a first wave of data collection in 2006-2007 from field sites in South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya, Ghana, Viet Nam, Bangladesh, Indonesia and India.

    Objective: To provide an overview of the demographic and health characteristics of participating countries, describe the research collaboration and introduce the first dataset and outputs. Methods: Data from two SAGE survey modules implemented in eight Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSS) were merged with core HDSS data to produce a summary dataset for the site-specific and cross-site analyses described in this supplement. Each participating HDSS site used standardised training materials and survey instruments. Face-to-face interviews were conducted. Ethical clearance was obtained from WHO and the local ethical authority for each participating HDSS site.

    Results: People aged 50 years and over in the eight participating countries represent over 15% of the current global older population, and is projected to reach 23% by 2030. The Asian HDSS sites have a larger proportion of burden of disease from non-communicable diseases and injuries relative to their African counterparts. A pooled sample of over 46,000 persons aged 50 and over from these eight HDSS sites was produced. The SAGE modules resulted in self-reported health, health status, functioning (from the WHO Disability Assessment Scale (WHODAS-II)) and well-being (from the WHO Quality of Life instrument (WHOQoL) variables). The HDSS databases contributed age, sex, marital status, education, socio-economic status and household size variables.

    Conclusion: The INDEPTH WHO-SAGE collaboration demonstrates the value and future possibilities for this type of research in informing policy and planning for a number of countries. This INDEPTH WHO- SAGE dataset will be placed in the public domain together with this open-access supplement and will be available through the GHA website (www.globalhealthaction.net) and other repositories. An improved dataset is being developed containing supplementary HDSS variables and vignette-adjusted health variables. This living collaboration is now preparing for a next wave of data collection.

  • 11.
    Ng, Nawi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana and Purworejo HDSS, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Kowal, Paul
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana and MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Naidoo, Nirmala
    Abdullah, Salim
    Bawah, Ayaga
    Binka, Fred
    Chuc, Nguyen T K
    Debpuur, Cornelius
    Egondi, Thaddeus
    Xavier Gómez-Olivé, F
    Hakimi, Mohammad
    Hirve, Siddhivinayak
    Hodgson, Abraham
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    Kyobutungi, Catherine
    Van Minh, Hoang
    Mwanyangala, Mathew A
    Nathan, Rose
    Razzaque, Abdur
    Sankoh, Osman
    Kim Streatfield, P
    Thorogood, Margaret
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wilopo, Siswanto
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Tollman, Stephen M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana and MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Chatterji, Somnath
    Health inequalities among older men and women in Africa and Asia: evidence from eight Health and Demographic Surveillance System sites in the INDEPTH WHO-SAGE Study2010In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 3, no Supplement 2, p. 96-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Declining rates of fertility and mortality are driving demographic transition in all regions of the world, leading to global population ageing and consequently changing patterns of global morbidity and mortality. Understanding sex-related health differences, recognising groups at risk of poor health and identifying determinants of poor health are therefore very important for both improving health trajectories and planning for the health needs of ageing populations.

    Objectives: To determine the extent to which demographic and socio-economic factors impact upon measures of health in older populations in Africa and Asia; to examine sex differences in health and further explain how these differences can be attributed to demographic and socio-economic determinants.

    Methods: A total of 46,269 individuals aged 50 years and over in eight Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) sites within the INDEPTH Network were studied during 2006-2007 using an abbreviated version of the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave I instrument The survey data were then linked to longitudinal HDSS background information. A health score was calculated based on self-reported health derived from eight health domains. Multivariable regression and post-regression decomposition provide ways of measuring and explaining the health score gap between men and women.

    Results: Older men have better self-reported health than older women. Differences in household socioeconomic levels, age, education levels, marital status and living arrangements explained from about 82% and 71% of the gaps in health score observed between men and women in South Africa and Kenya, respectively, to almost nothing in Bangladesh. Different health domains contributed differently to the overall health scores for men and women in each country.

    Conclusion: This study confirmed the existence of sex differences in self-reported health in low- and middleincome countries even after adjustments for differences in demographic and socio-economic factors. A decomposition analysis suggested that sex differences in health differed across the HDSS sites, with the greatest level of inequality found in Bangladesh. The analysis showed considerable variation in how differences in socio-demographic and economic characteristics explained the gaps in self-reported health observed between older men and women in African and Asian settings. The overall health score was a robust indicator of health, with two domains, pain and sleep/energy, contributing consistently across the HDSS sites. Further studies are warranted to understand other significant individual and contextual determinants to which these sex differences in health can be attributed. This will lay a foundation for a more evidence-based approach to resource allocation, and to developing health promotion programmes for older men and women in these settings.

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