umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Barajas-Lopez, Juan de Dios
    et al.
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Plastid-to-nucleus communication, signals controlling the running of the plant cell2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. Molecular Cell Research, ISSN 0167-4889, E-ISSN 1879-2596, Vol. 1833, no 2, p. 425-437Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of genes encoding organellar proteins in both the nucleus and the organelle necessitates tight coordination of expression by the different genomes, and this has led to the evolution of sophisticated intracellular signaling networks. Organelle-to-nucleus signaling, or retrograde control, coordinates the expression of nuclear genes encoding organellar proteins with the metabolic and developmental state of the organelle. Complex networks of retrograde signals orchestrate major changes in nuclear gene expression and coordinate cellular activities and assist the cell during plant development and stress responses. It has become clear that, even though the chloroplast depends on the nucleus for its function, plastid signals play important roles in an array of different cellular processes vital to the plant. Hence, the chloroplast exerts significant control over the running of the cell. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. 

  • 2.
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ceccoli, Romina D.
    Dalla Via, Maria V.
    Voss, Ingo
    Segretin, Maria E.
    Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.
    Melzer, Michael
    Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza
    Scheibe, Renate
    Hanke, Guy T.
    Expression of the Minor Isoform Pea Ferredoxin in Tobacco Alters Photosynthetic Electron Partitioning and Enhances Cyclic Electron Flow2013In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 161, no 2, p. 866-879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms.

  • 3.
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Guinea-Diaz, Manuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Whelan, James
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Interaction between plastid and mitochondrial retrograde signalling pathways during changes to plastid redox status2014In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 369, no 1640, article id 20130231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts depend upon each other; photosynthesis provides substrates for mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial metabolism is essential for sustaining photosynthetic carbon assimilation. In addition, mitochondrial respiration protects photosynthesis against photoinhibition by dissipating excess redox equivalents from the chloroplasts. Genetic defects in mitochondrial function result in an excessive reduction and energization of the chloroplast. Thus, it is clear that the activities of mitochondria and plastids need to be coordinated, but the manner by which the organelles communicate to coordinate their activities is unknown. The regulator of alternative oxidase (rao1) mutant was isolated as a mutant unable to induce AOX1a expression in response to the inhibitor of the mitochondrial cytochrome c reductase (complex III), antimycin A. RAO1 encodes the nuclear localized cyclin-dependent kinase E1 (CDKE1). Interestingly, the rao1 mutant demonstrates a genome uncoupled phenotype also in response to redox changes in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Thus, CDKE1 was shown to regulate both LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEX B (LHCB) and ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE 1 (AOX1a) expression in response to retrograde signals. Our results suggest that CDKE1 is a central nuclear component integrating mitochondrial and plastid retrograde signals and plays a role in regulating energy metabolism during the response to stress.

  • 4.
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Centro de Estudios Fotosintéticos y Bioquímicos, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (CEFOBI-CONICET/UNR), Rosario, Argentina.
    Liebsch, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR-CONICET), Rosario, Argentina.
    Guinea Diaz, Manuel
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Whelan, James
    Dual and dynamic intracellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana SnRK1.12019In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 2325-2338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sucrose non-fermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 1.1 (SnRK1.1; also known as KIN10 or SnRK1 alpha) has been identified as the catalytic subunit of the complex SnRK1, the Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of a central integrator of energy and stress signalling in eukaryotes dubbed AMPK/Snf1/SnRK1. A nuclear localization of SnRK1.1 has been previously described and is in line with its function as an integrator of energy and stress signals. Here, using two biological models (Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana), native regulatory sequences, different microscopy techniques, and manipulations of cellular energy status, it was found that SnRK1.1 is localized dynamically between the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This distribution was confirmed at a spatial and temporal level by co-localization studies with two different fluorescent ER markers, one of them being the SnRK1.1 phosphorylation target HMGR. The ER and nuclear localization displayed a dynamic behaviour in response to perturbations of the plastidic electron transport chain. These results suggest that an ER-associated SnRK1.1 fraction might be sensing the cellular energy status, being a point of crosstalk with other ER stress regulatory pathways.

  • 5.
    Kindgren, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kremnev, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lopez, Juan de Dios Barajas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Fernandez, Aurora Pinas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbecklab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kleine, Tatjana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Small, Ian
    Univ Western Australia, Australian Res Council Ctr Excellence Plant Energ, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The plastid redox insensitive 2 mutant of Arabidopsis is impaired in PEP activity and high light-dependent plastid redox signalling to the nucleus2012In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photosynthetic apparatus is composed of proteins encoded by genes from both the nuclear and the chloroplastic genomes. The activities of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes must therefore be closely coordinated through intracellular signalling. The plastids produce multiple retrograde signals at different times of their development, and in response to changes in the environment. These signals regulate the expression of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes to match the current status of the plastids. Using forward genetics we identified PLASTID REDOX INSENSITIVE 2 (PRIN2), a chloroplast component involved in redox-mediated retrograde signalling. The allelic mutants prin2-1 and prin2-2 demonstrated a misregulation of photosynthesis-associated nuclear gene expression in response to excess light, and an inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport. As a consequence of the misregulation of LHCB1.1 and LHCB2.4, the prin2 mutants displayed a high irradiance-sensitive phenotype with significant photoinactivation of photosystem II, indicated by a reduced variable to maximal fluorescence ratio (Fv/Fm). PRIN2 is localized to the nucleoids, and plastid transcriptome analyses demonstrated that PRIN2 is required for full expression of genes transcribed by the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP). Similarly to the prin2 mutants, the ys1 mutant with impaired PEP activity also demonstrated a misregulation of LHCB1.1 and LHCB2.4 expression in response to excess light, suggesting a direct role for PEP activity in redox-mediated retrograde signalling. Taken together, our results indicate that PRIN2 is part of the PEP machinery, and that the PEP complex responds to photosynthetic electron transport and generates a retrograde signal, enabling the plant to synchronize the expression of photosynthetic genes from both the nuclear and plastidic genomes.

  • 6. Ng, Sophia
    et al.
    Giraud, Estelle
    Duncan, Owen
    Law, Simon R.
    Wang, Yan
    Xu, Lin
    Narsai, Reena
    Carrie, Chris
    Walker, Hayden
    Day, David A.
    Blanco, Nicolas E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Whelan, James
    Ivanova, Aneta
    Cyclin-dependent Kinase E1 (CDKE1) Provides a Cellular Switch in Plants between Growth and Stress Responses2013In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 288, no 5, p. 3449-3459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants must deal effectively with unfavorable growth conditions that necessitate a coordinated response to integrate cellular signals with mitochondrial retrograde signals. A genetic screen was carried out to identify regulators of alternative oxidase (rao mutants), using AOX1a expression as a model system to study retrograde signaling in plants. Two independent rao1 mutant alleles identified CDKE1 as a central nuclear component integrating mitochondrial retrograde signals with energy signals under stress. CDKE1 is also necessary for responses to general cellular stresses, such as H2O2 and cold that act, at least in part, via anterograde pathways, and integrates signals from central energy/stress sensing kinase signal transduction pathways within the nucleus. Together, these results place CDKE1 as a central kinase integrating diverse cellular signals and shed light on a mechanism by which plants can effectively switch between growth and stress responses.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf