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  • 1.
    Eklund, Anton
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Österlund, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jaw-neck motor function in the acute stage after whiplash trauma2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Jaw-neck motor function is affected in the chronic stage following whiplash trauma. It is not known whether motor function is affected also in the early stage after neck trauma.

    Objectives: To determine how jaw and head movement amplitudes and movement cycle times correlate with jaw and neck pain, and neck disability in the acute stage after whiplash trauma. Methods Jaw and head movements during jaw opening-closing were recorded with an optoelectronic system in 23 cases (4 men, 19 women, 18-66 years) within 1 month after whiplash trauma and compared with 27 controls without neck trauma (15 men, 12 women, 20-66 years). Jaw and head movement amplitudes, head/jaw ratio (quotient of head and jaw movement amplitude) and movement cycle times were evaluated in relation to jaw and neck pain (Numeric Rating Scale) and neck disability (Neck Disability Index). Analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation.

    Results: Compared with controls, cases showed smaller jaw movement amplitudes (P = .006) but no difference in head movement amplitudes, head/jaw ratios or movement cycle times. There were no significant correlations between movement amplitudes or cycle times and jaw and neck pain, and neck disability. Cases with high neck pain intensity had smaller jaw movement amplitudes compared to cases with low neck pain intensity (P = .024).

    Conclusion: The results suggest that jaw-neck motor function may be affected in the acute stage after whiplash trauma and more so in cases with higher neck pain intensity.

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  • 2.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Marklund, Susanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma2016In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 95, no 10, p. 1155-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between whiplash trauma and chronic orofacial pain is unclear, especially with regard to the time elapsed from trauma to development of orofacial pain. The aim was to analyze prevalence of jaw pain and disability, as well as the relationship between pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions in the early nonchronic stage after whiplash trauma. In this case-control study, 70 individuals (40 women, 30 men, mean age 35.5 y) who visited an emergency department with neck pain following a car accident were examined within 3 wk of trauma (group 1) and compared with 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 33.8 y), who declined to attend a clinical examination but agreed to fill in questionnaires (group 2). The 2 case groups were compared with a matched control group of 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 37.6 y) without a history of neck trauma. All participants completed questionnaires regarding jaw pain and dysfunction, rating pain intensity in jaw and neck regions on the Numerical Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index, and Jaw Disability Checklist. Compared with controls, individuals with a recent whiplash trauma reported more jaw pain and dysfunction. Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between jaw and neck pain ratings for group 1 (r = 0.61, P < 0.0001) and group 2 (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001). In the logistic regression analysis, cases showed higher odds ratios (range, 6.1 to 40.8) for jaw and neck pain and disability compared with controls. Taken together, the results show that individuals with a recent whiplash trauma report more jaw pain and disability compared with controls without a history of neck trauma. Furthermore, the correlation between jaw and neck pain intensity implies that intensity of neck pain in the acute stage after whiplash trauma might be a possible risk factor also for development of chronic orofacial pain.

  • 3.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Altered thermal sensitivity in facial skin in chronic whiplash-associated disorders2013In: International Journal of Oral Science, ISSN 1674-2818, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 150-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a close functional relationship between the jaw and neck regions and it has been suggested that trigeminal sensory impairment can follow whiplash injury. Inclusion of manageable routines for valid assessment of the facial sensory capacity is thus needed for comprehensive evaluations of patients exposed to such trauma. The present study investigated facial thermal thresholds in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) with both a qualitative method and quantitative sensory testing (QST). Ten women with pain and dysfunction following a whiplash injury were compared to 10 healthy age-matched women. Thermal detection thresholds were assessed by qualitative chair-side testing and by QST according to the method-of-limits. Seven test sites in the facial skin (overlying each trigeminal branch bilaterally, and the midpoint of the chin) were examined. The detection warm and cold thresholds were defined as the mean values of 10 individual thresholds. For the WAD patients, the qualitative assessment demonstrated both reduced and increased sensitivity compared to the healthy, whereas QST systematically showed significantly higher detection thresholds (i.e., decreased sensitivity) for both cold and warm stimuli. For the individuals who were assessed as having increased sensitivity in the qualitative assessment, the QST displayed either normal or higher thresholds, i.e., decreased sensitivity. The results suggest that QST is more sensitive for detecting thermal sensory disturbances in the face than a qualitative method. The impaired thermal sensitivity among the patients corroborates the notion of altered thermal detection capacity induced by WAD-related pain.

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  • 4.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions after whiplash trauma: a short- and long-term perspective2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whiplash trauma, a hyperextension-flexion trauma to the neck that is often related to a car accident, affects tens of thousands in Sweden every year. A significant proportion will develop long-term symptoms including neck pain and dysfunction – this is embraced as Whiplash associated disorders (WAD). Some individuals also develop pain and dysfunction in the orofacial region that is denoted as Temporomandibular disorder (TMD). TMD is common in the population with a prevalence of about 10% but the relation to whiplash trauma is still unclear. The limited number of prospective studies on TMD after whiplash trauma show diverging results, but it has been suggested that TMD develops over time and not in close proximity to the trauma. Prospective studies are needed to determine the course of jaw pain and disability after whiplash trauma.

    The general aim of this thesis was to evaluate the presence and course of pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions at the acute and chronic stages after whiplash trauma.

    This prospective cohort study included at baseline 176 cases with a recent whiplash trauma, and 116 age and gender matched controls without a history of neck trauma that were recruited from the general population. The cases had visited the emergency department at Umeå university hospital, Sweden, with neck pain within 72 hours following a car accident and had been diagnosed with neck distortion by a physician. The cases were examined within one month after the trauma (December 2010 to January 2016) and at a 2-year followup (December 2012 to January 2018). All participants completed questionnaires regarding pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions, physical symptoms (pain and non-pain items), and depression. At baseline, 80 of the cases and 80 of the controls also completed a 5-minute chewing capacity test. At the 2- year follow-up, 119 cases (68%) and 104 controls (90%) were re-examined with the same questionnaires.

    Compared to controls, within one month after a whiplash trauma cases reported significantly more pain in the jaw and neck regions with a positive correlation between the intensity of pain in these regions (Paper I). In the acute stage after trauma, cases, compared to controls, showed a reduced chewing capacity, and this was related to the severity of neck disability (Paper II). For cases, jaw and neck pain correlated positively to each other, to non-specific physical symptoms, and to depression at both the acute (Paper III) and chronic stages (Paper IV). About one third (34%) of the cases reported orofacial pain at baseline, and for a majority of these, the pain persisted at the 2-year follow-up (Paper IV).

    The presence of orofacial pain early after a whiplash trauma indicates involvement of central sensitization and spread of pain between the jaw and neck regions. The positive correlations between pain in the jaw and neck regions, and to psychosocial factors, underline the integration of these regions and the importance of a biopsychosocial perspective. The impaired jaw function shortly after a neck trauma further underlines the close sensorimotor relationship between the trigeminal and cervical regions. The finding that orofacial pain is common shortly after whiplash trauma, and often persists into the chronic stage, indicates that assessment in the acute stage should include both the neck and jaw regions. From this, it follows that multidisciplinary teams that entail both medical professions and dentists specialised in orofacial pain can be beneficial in the early assessment after whiplash trauma.

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  • 5.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
    Brechter, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    van Dijken, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Effect of a Nonrinse Conditioner on the Durability of a Polyacid-modified Resin Composite Fissure Sealant2004In: Journal of Dentistry for Children, ISSN 0022-0353, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the simplified conditioning on durability of polyacid-modified resin composite (PMRC; Dyract Seal) fissure sealants. The effectiveness of a nonrinsing conditioner (NRC) on retention of PMRC sealants (92) was studied in a split-mouth design.

    Methods: The enamel of 1 molar was pretreated with NRC and coated with Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany)/PMRC. The contralateral molar was conditioned with 36% phosphoric acid and sealed with Delton. The sealant retention was evaluated during 2 years. In addition 49 pairs were sealed with Prime & BondNT/PMRC after conditioning with 36% phosphoric acid and evaluated after 1 year.

    Results: Significantly higher loss rates at 1 and 2 years were observed for the NRC/Prime &

    Bond NT/PMRC sealants. At 2 years, partial and total loss rates for Delton were 23% and 11%, and for NRC/Prime & Bond NT/PRMC sealants were 44% and 40%, respectively. At

    1 year, phosphoric acid-conditioned Prime & Bond NT/PMRC sealants showed significantly better retention than the NRC-conditioned PMRC sealants and the phosphoric acid- conditioned Delton sealants.

    Conclusions: Conditioning with NRC prior to sealant application cannot be recommended.

  • 6.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    List, Thomas
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Relationship Between Psychosocial Factors and Pain in the Jaw and Neck Regions Shortly After Whiplash Trauma2019In: Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 213-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess jaw pain shortly after whiplash trauma in relation to neck pain, physical symptoms, depression, and jaw pain-related disability.

    Methods: A total of 181 cases (106 women and 75 men, mean ages 33.7 and 36.8 years, respectively) were examined within 1 month after a whiplash trauma and compared to 117 controls (68 women and 49 men, 34.2 and 30.9 years, respectively). Participants rated current jaw and neck pain intensity on a numeric rating scale and rated nonspecific physical symptoms and depression symptoms on subscales of the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. The nonspecific physical symptoms were further analyzed with and without pain items. Disability related to jaw pain and neck pain was also assessed. Differences between groups were calculated using Mann-Whitney U test, and correlations were measured using Spearman correlation.

    Results: Compared to controls, cases reported higher current jaw and neck pain intensity (P < .0001), together with higher scores for physical nonpain and pain symptoms, depression, and jaw pain-related disability (P < .0001 for all). For cases, there were moderate correlations between nonspecific physical symptoms and jaw pain and neck pain, as well as between jaw pain-related disability and jaw pain and neck pain (r = 0.43 to 0.77, P < .0001 for all). Low correlations were observed between depression and jaw pain and neck pain (r = 0.34 to 0.39, both P < .0001).

    Conclusion: Shortly after a whiplash trauma, pain in the jaw and neck regions is associated with the severity of psychosocial factors. Thus, psychosocial factors may play a role in the development of pain in the jaw region after whiplash trauma.

  • 7.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial pain and Jaw function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Effects on jaw function shortly after whiplash trauma2017In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 941-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal jaw function involves muscles and joints of both jaw and neck. A whiplash trauma may disturb the integrated jaw-neck sensory-motor function and thereby impair chewing ability; however, it is not known if such impairment is present shortly after a neck trauma or develops over time. The aim was to evaluate jaw function after a recent whiplash trauma. Eighty cases (47 women) were examined within 1 month after a whiplash trauma and compared to 80 controls (47 women) without neck trauma. Participants completed the Jaw disability checklist (JDC) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaires and performed a 5-minute chewing test. Elicited fatigue and pain during chewing were noted, and group differences were evaluated with Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Compared to controls, cases had higher JDC (P<.0001) and NDI scores (15% vs 2%, P<.0001), and reported more fatigue (53% vs 31%, P=.006) and pain (30% vs 10%, P=.003) during the chewing test. Cases also had a shorter onset time for fatigue and pain (both P=.001) Furthermore, cases reporting symptoms during chewing had higher JDC and NDI scores compared to cases not reporting symptoms (both P=.01). Symptoms mainly occurred in the trigeminal area for both groups, but also in spinal areas more often for cases than for controls. Taken together, the results indicate that jaw-neck sensory-motor function is impaired already within 1month after a whiplash trauma. The association between neck disability and jaw impairment underlines the close functional relationship between the regions, and stresses the importance of multidisciplinary assessment.

  • 8.
    Lampa, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wänman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Orofacial pain and Jaw function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The Course of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Disability after Whiplash Trauma: A 2-year Prospective Study2019In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study.

    Objective: To evaluate the course of orofacial pain and jaw disability in relation to neck pain, neck disability and psychosocial factors at the acute stage and the chronic stage after whiplash trauma.

    Summary of Background Data: Many individuals report chronic pain in the orofacial region after whiplash trauma. The possible association between whiplash trauma and orofacial pain is debated. Prospective studies are therefore needed to evaluate the development of orofacial pain after whiplash trauma.

    Methods: Within one month following a whiplash trauma, 176 cases were examined and compared to 116 controls with questionnaires concerning neck and jaw pain and related disability, non-specific physical symptoms and depression. At the 2-year follow-up, 119 cases (68%) and 104 controls (90%) were re-examined.

    Results: Compared to controls, cases reported more jaw and neck pain, both at baseline and follow-up. A majority (68%) of cases with pain in the jaw region in the acute stage also reported jaw pain at the follow-up. The intensity of jaw and neck pain was correlated both at baseline and follow-up. Both neck pain and jaw pain was correlated to non-specific physical symptoms and to depression.

    Conclusion: Orofacial pain and jaw disability related to neck pain is often present already at the acute stage after whiplash trauma and persist into the chronic stage for most individuals. Assessment following whiplash trauma should therefore include both the neck and the orofacial regions. More studies are needed to further evaluate risk factors for development of orofacial pain after whiplash trauma.

    Level of Evidence: 3

  • 9.
    Lövgren, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Österlund, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ilgunas, Aurelija
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    A high prevalence of TMD is related to somatic awareness and pain intensity among healthy dental students2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 387-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Dental students have been identified as a group with high risks of developing both temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and psychosocial conditions. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cross-sectional prevalence of TMD diagnoses, as defined in the Diagnostic Criteria (DC)/TMD, among dental students. The secondary aim was to evaluate the prevalence and association of behavioural and psychosocial factors in relation to DC/TMD diagnoses.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted among undergraduate dental students during the second semester of their third year at the Department of Odontology, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Sweden. Three consecutive cohorts were recruited during August in 2013, 2014, 2015. In total, 54 students were included and examined according the DC/TMD procedure.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of any DC/TMD diagnosis was 30%. The most prevalent TMD diagnosis was myalgia. Individuals with a TMD-pain diagnosis (i.e. myalgia or arthralgia) reported significantly higher pain intensity levels according to the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) as compared to individuals without TMD-pain (Fisher's exact test p < .001, two-sided). In addition, individuals with any TMD scored significantly higher jaw functional limitations according to the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale 20 (JFLS-20, p < .001) and oral parafunctions according to the Oral Behavior Checklist (OBC, p = .005) as compared to individuals without TMD. The psychosocial factors evaluated did not differ between individual with or without a TMD diagnosis. The majority of the dental students reported symptoms that are already identified as risk factors for developing TMD and pain conditions. However, longitudinal data are needed to evaluate how this evolves over time.

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