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  • 1.
    Andersson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Human adenoviruses: new bioassays for antiviral screening and CD46 interaction2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens all over the world. The majority of the population has at some point been infected with an adenovirus. Although severe disease can occur in otherwise healthy individuals an adenovirus infection is most commonly self limited in these cases. For immunocompromised individuals however, adenoviruses can be life-threatening pathogens capable of causing disseminated disease and multiple organ failure. Still there is no approved drug specific for treatment of adenovirus infections. We have addressed this using a unique whole cell viral replication reporter gene assay to screen small organic molecules for anti-adenoviral effect. This RCAd11pGFP-vector based assay allowed screening without any preconceived idea of the mechanism for adenovirus inhibition. As a result of the screening campaign 2-[[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino]-benzoic acid turned out to be a potent inhibitor of adenoviral replication. To establish a structure-activity relationship a number of analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-adenoviral effect. The carboxylic acid moiety of the molecule was important for efficient inhibition of adenovirus replication.

    There are 54 adenovirus types characterized today and these are divided into seven species, A-G. The receptors used by species B and other adenoviruses are not fully characterized. CD46 is a complement regulatory molecule suggested to be used by all species B types and some species D types but this is not established. We have designed a new bioassay for assessment of the interaction between adenoviruses and CD46 and investigated the CD46-binding capacity of adenovirus types indicated to interact with CD46. We concluded that Ad11p, Ad34, Ad35, and Ad50 clearly bind CD46 specifically, whereas Ad3p, Ad7p, Ad14, and Ad37 do not.

    CD46 is expressed on all human nucleated cells and serves as a receptor for a number of different bacteria and viruses. Downregulation of CD46 on the cell surface occurs upon binding by some of these pathogens. We show that early in infection Ad11p virions downregulate CD46 upon binding to a much higher extent than the complement regulatory molecules CD55 and CD59.

    These findings may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of adenoviruses in general and species B adenoviruses in particular and hopefully we have discovered a molecule that can be the basis for development of new anti-adenoviral drugs.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Emma K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chapman, Matthew
    Small Molecule Disruption of B-subtilis Biofilms by Targeting the Amyloid Matrix2013In: Chemistry and Biology, ISSN 1074-5521, E-ISSN 1879-1301, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small molecule inhibitors of amyloid aggregation have potential as treatment for a variety of conditions. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Romero and colleagues use amyloid-dependent B. subtilis biofilm formation to screen for amyloid inhibitors, identifying compounds that not only inhibit B. subtilis biofilm formation but also ones that disrupt preformed biofilms.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Emma K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus interactions with CD46 on transgenic mouse erythrocytes2010In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 402, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemagglutination is an established method but has not been used previously to determine the efficacy of virus binding to a specific cellular receptor. Here we have utilized CD46-expressing erythrocytes from a transgenic mouse to establish whether and to what extent the species B adenoviruses (Ads) as well as Ad37 and Ad49 of species D can interact with CD46. A number of different agglutination patterns, and hence CD46 interactions, could be observed for the different adenovirus types. In this system Ad7p, Ad11a, and Ad14 did not agglutinate mouse erythrocytes at all. Hemagglutination of CD46 expressing erythrocytes with high efficiency was observed for the previously established CD46 users Ad11p and Ad35 as well as for the less investigated Ad34. Ad50 agglutinated with moderate efficiency. Ad16, Ad21 and Ad49 gave incomplete agglutination. Ad16 was the only adenovirus that could be eluted. No specific CD46 interaction could be observed for Ad3p or for Ad37.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Emma K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Spjut, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Small molecule screening using a whole cell viral replication reporter gene assay identifies 2-{[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino}-benzoic acid as a novel anti-adenoviral compound2010In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 3871-3877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus infections are widespread in society and are occasionally associated with severe, but rarely with life-threatening, disease in otherwise healthy individuals. In contrast, adenovirus infections present a real threat to immunocompromised individuals and can result in disseminated and fatal disease. The number of patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is steadily increasing, as is the number of AIDS patients, and this makes the problem of adenovirus infections even more urgent to solve. There is no formally approved treatment of adenovirus infections today, and existing antiviral agents evaluated for their anti-adenoviral effect give inconsistent results. We have developed a whole cell-based assay for high-throughput screening of potential anti-adenoviral compounds. The assay is unique in that it is based on a replication competent adenovirus type 11p GFP-expressing vector (RCAd11pGFP). This allows measurement of fluorescence changes as a direct result of RCAd11pGFP genome expression. Using this assay, we have screened 9,800 commercially available small organic compounds. Initially, we observed approximately 400 compounds that inhibited adenovirus expression in vitro by >/= 80% but only 24 were later confirmed as dose-dependent inhibitors of adenovirus. One compound in particular, 2-[[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino]-benzoic acid, turned out to be a potent inhibitor of adenovirus replication.

  • 5.
    Good, James A. D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kulén, Martina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Silver, Jim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bahnan, Wael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Núñez-Otero, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Wede, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    de Groot, Esmee
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Thiazolino 2-pyridone amide isosteres as inhibitors of Chlamydia trachomatis infectivity2017In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 60, no 22, p. 9393-9399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a global health burden due to its prevalence as a sexually transmitted disease and as the causative agent of the eye infection trachoma. We recently discovered 3-amido thiazolino 2-pyridones which attenuated C. trachomatis infectivity without affecting host cell or commensal bacteria viability. We present here the synthesis and evaluation of nonhydrolyzable amide isosteres based on this class, leading to highly potent 1,2,3-triazole based infectivity inhibitors (EC50 ≤ 20 nM).

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Dan J
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Andersson, Emma K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Hu, Yan-Ling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Marttila, Marko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wang, Li
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus 11p downregulates CD46 early in infection2010In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 405, no 2, p. 474-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus 11 prototype (Ad11p), belonging to species B, uses CD46 as an attachment receptor. CD46, a complement regulatory molecule, is expressed on all human nucleated cells. We show here that Ad11p virions downregulate CD46 on the surface of K562 cells as early as 5min p.i. Specific binding to CD46 by the Ad11p fiber knob was required to mediate downregulation. The complement regulatory factors CD55 and CD59 were also reduced to a significant extent as a consequence of Ad11p binding to K562 cells. In contrast, binding of Ad7p did not result in downregulation of CD46 early in infection. Thus, the presumed interaction between Ad7p and CD46 did not have the same consequences as the Ad11p-CD46 interaction, the latter virus (Ad11p) being a promising gene therapy vector candidate. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of species B adenovirus infections.

  • 7.
    Horvath, Istvan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Weise, Christoph F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Emma K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sellstedt, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bengtsson, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hultgren, Scott J
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, United States.
    Chapman, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mechanisms of Protein Oligomerization: Inhibitor of Functional Amyloids Templates α-Synuclein Fibrillation2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 7, p. 3439-3444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small organic molecules that inhibit functional bacterial amyloid fibers, curli, are promising new antibiotics. Here we investigated the mechanism by which the ring-fused 2-pyridone FN075 inhibits fibrillation of the curli protein CsgA. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we found that FN075 promotes CsgA to form off-pathway, non-amyloidogenic oligomeric species. In light of the generic properties of amyloids, we tested whether FN075 would also affect the fibrillation reaction of human α-synuclein, an amyloid-forming protein involved in Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, FN075 stimulates α-synuclein amyloid fiber formation as measured by thioflavin T emission, electron microscopy (EM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). NMR data on (15)N-labeled α-synuclein show that upon FN075 addition, α-synuclein oligomers with 7 nm radius form in which the C-terminal 40 residues remain disordered and solvent exposed. The polypeptides in these oligomers contain β-like secondary structure, and the oligomers are detectable by AFM, EM, and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Taken together, FN075 triggers oligomer formation of both proteins: in the case of CsgA, the oligomers do not proceed to fibers, whereas for α-synuclein, the oligomers are poised to rapidly form fibers. We conclude that there is a fine balance between small-molecule inhibition and templation that depends on protein chemistry.

  • 8.
    Öberg, Christopher T
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Andersson, Emma K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Tran, Nam Phuong Nguyen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationships of 2-[2-(benzoylamino)benzoylamino]benzoic acid analogues as inhibitors of adenovirus replication2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 3170-3181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-[2-Benzoylamino)benzoylamino]benzoic acid (1) was previously identified as a potent and nontoxic antiadenoviral compound ( Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2010 , 54 , 3871 ). Here, the potency of 1 was improved over three generations of compounds. We found that the ortho, ortho substituent pattern and the presence of the carboxylic acid of 1 are favorable for this class of compounds and that the direction of the amide bonds (as in 1) is obligatory. Some variability in the N-terminal moiety was tolerated, but benzamides appear to be preferred. The substituents on the middle and C-terminal rings were varied, resulting in two potent inhibitors, 35g and 35j, with EC(50) = 0.6 μM and low cell toxicity.

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