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  • 1.
    Alvehus, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Simonyte, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Andersson, Therése
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Burén, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rask, Eva
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adipose tissue IL-8 is increased in normal weight women after menopause and reduced after gastric bypass surgery in obese women2012In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 684-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  The menopausal transition is characterized by increased body fat accumulation, including redistribution from peripheral to central fat depots. This distribution is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are linked to low-grade inflammation. We determined whether postmenopausal women have higher levels of inflammatory markers, compared to premenopausal women. We also wanted to determine if these markers are reduced by stable weight loss in obese women. Design and methods:  Anthropometric data, blood samples, and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were collected from normal weight premenopausal and postmenopausal women and obese women before and 2 years after gastric bypass surgery. Serum protein levels and adipose tissue gene expression of inflammatory markers were investigated. Results:  IL-8 expression in adipose tissue and circulating levels were higher in postmenopausal versus premenopausal women. IL-8 expression was associated with waist circumference, independent of menopausal status. IL-6 expression and serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 were higher in postmenopausal versus premenopausal women. Two years after gastric bypass surgery, adipose expression of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and MCP-1 decreased significantly. Serum insulin levels were associated with inflammation-related gene expression before gastric bypass surgery, but these associations disappeared after surgery. Conclusion:  Postmenopausal women have an increased inflammatory response in the subcutaneous fat and circulation. Inflammatory markers in adipose tissue decreased significantly after surgery-induced weight loss. This effect may be beneficial for metabolic control and reduced cardiovascular risk after weight loss. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    McInnes, Kerry
    Endocrine Unit, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Simonyte, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rask, Eva
    Institutionen för medicin, Örebro universitetssjukhus, Örebro, Sverige.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Seckl, Jonathan R
    Endocrinology Unit, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Estrogen upregulates 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in adipose tissues via estrogen receptor βManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Therése
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Estrogen and Glucocorticoid Metabolism2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among women in Sweden. The risk of CVD increases rapidly after the menopause. A major contributing factor may be the redistribution of adipose tissue, from the peripheral to central depots, associated with menopause. This change in body composition is commonly attributed to declining estrogen levels but may also be affected by tissue-specific alterations in exposure to other steroid hormones, notably glucocorticoids – mainly cortisol in humans. Indeed, adipose tissue-specific overexpression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) induces central obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in mice. Interestingly, estrogen may regulate this enzyme. The aim of this thesis was to investigate putative links between estrogen and glucocorticoid activation by 11βHSD1. Materials and Methods: 11βHSD1 expression and/or activity in adipose tissue and liver, and adipose estrogen receptor α and β (ERα and ERβ) gene expression, were investigated in lean pre- and postmenopausal women and ovariectomized rodents with and without estrogen supplementation. In lean women measures of 11βHSD1 were correlated to risk markers for CVD. The association between adipose 11βHSD1 and ER mRNA expression was investigated in both lean women and rats and in an additional cohort of obese premenopausal women. In vitro experiments with adipocyte cell lines were used to explore possible pathways for estrogen regulation of 11βHSD1. Results: Subcutaneous adipose tissue transcript levels and hepatic activity of 11βHSD1 were higher in postmenopausal vs. premenopausal women. In rodents, estrogen treatment to ovariectomized rats decreased visceral adipose tissue 11βHSD1, resulting in a shift towards higher subcutaneous (vs. visceral) 11βHSD1 mRNA expression/activity. Increased adipose and hepatic 11βHSD1 were associated with increased blood pressure and a disadvantageous blood lipid profile in humans. We found significant positive associations between 11βHSD1 and ERβ transcript levels in adipose tissue. The in vitro experiments showed upregulation of 11βHSD1 mRNA expression and activity with estrogen or ERβ-agonist treatment at low (corresponding to physiological) concentrations. Conclusions: Our studies show for the first time increased local tissue glucocorticoid activation with menopause/age in women. This may contribute to an increased risk of CVD. Estrogen treatment in rodents induces a shift in 11βHSD1 activity towards the subcutaneous adipose tissue depots, which may direct fat accumulation to this metabolically “safer” depot. The in vitro studies suggest that low-dose estrogen treatment upregulates 11βHSD1 via ERβ. In summary, estrogen - glucocorticoid metabolism interactions may be key in the development of menopause-related metabolic dysfunction and in part mediate the beneficial effects of postmenopausal estrogen treatment on body fat distribution.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Therése
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Simonyte, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Andrew, Ruth
    Strand, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Burén, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Walker, Brian R
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Tissue-specific increases in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in normal weight postmenopausal women2009In: PloS one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 12, p. e8475-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With age and menopause there is a shift in adipose distribution from gluteo-femoral to abdominal depots in women. Associated with this redistribution of fat are increased risks of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Glucocorticoids influence body composition, and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1) which converts inert cortisone to active cortisol is a putative key mediator of metabolic complications in obesity. Increased 11betaHSD1 in adipose tissue may contribute to postmenopausal central obesity. We hypothesized that tissue-specific 11betaHSD1 gene expression and activity are up-regulated in the older, postmenopausal women compared to young, premenopausal women. Twenty-three pre- and 23 postmenopausal, healthy, normal weight women were recruited. The participants underwent a urine collection, a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy and the hepatic 11betaHSD1 activity was estimated by the serum cortisol response after an oral dose of cortisone. Urinary (5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol+5beta-tetrahydrocortisol)/tetrahydrocortisone ratios were higher in postmenopausal women versus premenopausal women in luteal phase (P<0.05), indicating an increased whole-body 11betaHSD1 activity. Postmenopausal women had higher 11betaHSD1 gene expression in subcutaneous fat (P<0.05). Hepatic first pass conversion of oral cortisone to cortisol was also increased in postmenopausal women versus premenopausal women in follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (P<0.01, at 30 min post cortisone ingestion), suggesting higher hepatic 11betaHSD1 activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that postmenopausal normal weight women have increased 11betaHSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver. This may contribute to metabolic dysfunctions with menopause and ageing in women.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Therése
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Simonyté, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Estrogen reduces 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in liver and visceral, but not subcutaneous, adipose tissue in rats2010In: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), ISSN 1930-7381, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 470-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following menopause, body fat is redistributed from peripheral to central depots. This may be linked to the age related decrease in estrogen levels. We hypothesized that estrogen supplementation could counteract this fat redistribution through tissue-specific modulation of glucocorticoid exposure. We measured fat depot masses and the expression and activity of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1) in fat and liver of ovariectomized female rats treated with or without 17beta-estradiol. 11betaHSD1 converts inert cortisone, or 11-dehydrocorticosterone in rats into active cortisol and corticosterone. Estradiol-treated rats gained less weight and had significantly lower visceral adipose tissue weight than nontreated rats (P < 0.01); subcutaneous adipose weight was unaltered. In addition, 11betaHSD1 activity/expression was downregulated in liver and visceral, but not subcutaneous, fat of estradiol-treated rats (P < 0.001 for both). This downregulation altered the balance of 11betaHSD1 expression and activity between adipose tissue depots, with higher levels in subcutaneous than visceral adipose tissue of estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05 for both), opposite the pattern in ovariectomized rats not treated with estradiol (P < 0.001 for mRNA expression). Thus, estrogen modulates fat distribution, at least in part, through effects on tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism, suggesting that estrogen replacement therapy could influence obesity related morbidity in postmenopausal women.

  • 6. McInnes, Kerry J.
    et al.
    Andersson, Therese C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Simonyte, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Seckl, Jonathan R.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Association of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I expression and activity with estrogen receptor beta in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women2012In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1347-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (11 beta HSD1) regenerates active cortisol from inert cortisone in adipose tissue. Elevated adipose tissue 11 beta HSD1 activity is observed in obese humans and rodents, where it is linked to obesity and its metabolic consequences. Menopause is also associated with increased abdominal fat accumulation, suggesting that estrogen is also important in adipose tissue metabolism. The purpose of this current study was to establish whether estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ER-beta) could influence 11 beta HSD1 in premenopausal and postmenopausal adipose tissues. Methods: Nineteen premenopausal (aged 26 +/- 5 y; body mass index, 23.6 +/- 1.6 kg/m(2)) and 23 postmenopausal (aged 63 +/- 4 y; body mass index, 23.4 +/- 1.9 kg/m(2)) healthy women were studied. Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies and fasting venous blood samples were taken. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome adipocyte cells were treated with ER-alpha- and ER-beta-specific agonists for 24 hours. Basic anthropometric data, serum 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone concentrations, ER-alpha and ER-beta messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, and 11 beta HSD1 mRNA, protein, and activity levels were assessed. Results: ER-beta and 11 beta HSD1, but not ER-alpha, mRNAs were significantly increased in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. ER-beta had a significant positive correlation with the mRNA level of 11 beta HSD1 in adipose tissue from premenopausal and postmenopausal women. This association between ER-beta and 11 beta HSD1 was greatest in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women. In human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome adipocytes, diarylpropiolnitrile, a selective ER-beta agonist, increased 11 beta HSD1 mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Conclusions: We conclude that, in adipose tissue, ER-beta-mediated estrogen signaling can up-regulate 11 beta HSD1 and that this may be of particular importance in postmenopausal women.

  • 7.
    Rodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Alvehus, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Andersson, Therése
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Jacobsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Comparison of the effects of nicotine upon the transcellular electrical resistance and sucrose permeability of human ECV304/rat C6 co-cultures and human CaCo2 cells2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 207, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now well established that nicotine adversely affects the integrity of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In contrast, nicotine has been reported to increase the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of CaCo2 colon cancer cells. In the present study, the effects of nicotine upon the TEER and sucrose permeability of ECV304/C6 co-cultures and, for comparative purposes, CaCo2 cells has been investigated. Neither ECV304 nor C6 cells were found to express measurable membrane levels of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, as assessed by [3H]–epibatidine binding. Nicotine treatment (0.01–1 µM) for up to 48 h had little or no effect upon the TEER or sucrose permeability of either ECV304/C6 co-cultures or CaCo2 cells. It is concluded that in contrast to the situation for the BBB, ECV304 cells lack nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the barrier properties of ECV304/C6 co-cultures are not affected to any important extent by nicotine. This study underlines the conclusions made by other authors that the ECV304/C6 co-culture system is of limited validity as a model of the BBB.

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