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  • 1.
    Croon, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Being-with Information Technology1999In: Proceedings of HCI International '99: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design / [ed] Hans-Jörg Bullinger & Jürgen Ziegler, Munich, Germany: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates , 1999, p. 392-396Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Croon, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Making sense of cyberspace: a question of being-with information technology1999In: Proceedings of the Conference Exploring Cyber Society: Social, Political, Economic and Cultural Issues / [ed] Armitage, John & Roberts, Joanne, Newcastle, UK: Univeristy of Northumbria at Newcastle , 1999, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The various ways in which people speak about and use information and communicationtechnologies indicates that these technologies puzzle and amaze. People are trying to makesense of a new and unfamiliar technology and forms of communicating and being withothers. At the same time they are forming new ways of community and life.This paper is related to people’s relationships with information and communicationtechnologies (ICTs) and how these relationships are understood. As information technologyincreasingly extend various horizons in our lives, it is necessary for new and diverseunderstandings of the relationship between humans and information technology.The central notion in this paper is that people’s experiences of information technology areof great importance for how the technology is understood, used, evaluated and designed. Ofparticular importance is the emotional and diverse meanings attributed in relation toinformation technology.One example is the contemporary understandings of Virtual Communities that areestablished through people’s experiences with, in or through information and communicationtechnologies. Virtual communities may or may not be connected to the physical world andexists within a continuum of interaction from tools for computing, writing, designing andcommunicating to various life forms. That is, new context of signification and affectivecirculation that structure individual and cultural life. As such, people’s perceptions andexperiences of computer-mediated communication shift and change depending on what theyare doing or why they are interacting at a given time.The question is therefore not how to determine or evaluate various technologies usefulnessor implication but how to establish relevant knowledge that can be valid for the determinationof future directions in the process of cultural creation.By an experiential understanding of information technology I hold it possible to attain thenecessary sensibility for the complexities arising from peoples various interpretations ofinformation and communication technologies. Through peoples experiences with ICTsresearchers become challenged with new dimensions of intellectual engagement in ourcontemporary life.

  • 3.
    Croon, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    R U Out There?: On Personal Communities in Cyberspace1997In: Proceedings of IRIS 20: Social Informatics / [ed] Braa, Kristine & Monteiro, Eric, Oslo: Department of Informatics, University of Oslo , 1997, p. 591-604Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of information technology and telecommunication is creating newsocial structures in cyberspace, so called virtual communities. These communities areoften regarded as constituted of a group of people joined together by a shared interestusing information technology as a mean. It might be that the members of a communitydo all their communication through electronic media and never meet in real life or thatthe community members do not belong to any specific location. Virtual communitieshave also so far been regarded as something that has little or no correspondence to reallife situations but as more people enters cyberspace the boundaries between virtual lifeand real life are becoming indistinct and blurred. It seems that people, in addition tocreating new relationships based on shared interests, regard cyberspace as a place inwhich to enhance already existing relationships with friends, kin and work mates. Usingthe concept of personal community the purpose of this paper is to give one illustration ofhow individuals can develop, maintain and enhance already existing social relationshipsthrough cyberspace. This individual usage implies a continuing trend of privatizing thirdplaces when more human activities are moved into cyberspace. It also implies that thedevelopment of personal communities in cyberspace will have impacts on the notion ofcommunity, virtual as well as real. Since personal communities are likely to grow there isa need for more detailed studies of personal communities, but also studies of howindividuals are using different forms of information technology to become linked todifferent societal activities.

  • 4.
    Croon, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Re-framing the notion of Context in Information Systems1998In: Proceedings of IRIS 21: Information Systems Research in Collaboration with Industry / [ed] Buch, N. J., Aalborg, Denmark: Computer Science, University of Aalborg, Denmark , 1998, p. 139-150Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Croon, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Style and examplar: Two concepts to improve the study of design practice1993In: Proceedings of the 16th IRIS: Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Copenhagen 7-10 August 1993 / [ed] Bansler, J. P, Bødker, K., Kensing, F., Nørbjerg, J., Pries-Heje, J., Copenhagen: Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen , 1993, p. 410-416Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Croon, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Palmquist, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Virtualisering och den sociala konstruktionen av kön och teknik2001In: Från Siffror till Surfning: könsperspektiv på informationsteknik / [ed] Kallin, Lena & Palmquist, Lena, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2001, p. 71-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Croon, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Everyday Aesthetics and  Design of Information Technology2003In: Techne: Design aesthetics: die frage über technik, Barcelona, Spain: University of Barcelona, Spain , 2003, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Croon, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Ågren, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fyra former av virtuella gemenskaper1998In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, no 2, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Accountability in design2010In: Travelling thoughtfulness: feminist technoscience stories / [ed] Elovaara, P., Sefyrin, J., Öhman M-B., & Björkman, C., Umeå: Informatik, Umeå universitet , 2010, p. 293-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Back to Basic: An anachronistic assessment of the critical legacy of IS research2006In: Proceedings of the  29th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 29), August 12-15 2006, Helsingør, Denmark.: Paradigms, Politics, Paradoxes, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Back to Basics: Exploring the Critical Legacy of IS Research2006In: Proceedings of the 29th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Paradigms Politics Paradoxes, August 12-15, Helsingör., 2006, , p. 15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main assumption in this paper is that there are important, unfamiliar andobscure qualities of information technology as it intertwines with people’s everyday life.That is, aspects that so far and to a large extent has escaped critical scrutiny. It is alsotentatively suggested that these unknown qualities are being prevented from criticalexaminations as long as we pursue investigations based on design and/or useperspectives. In this paper a tentative response to the request for new perspectives oncritical research is formulated. The response is based on my assessment of Critical Theoryand Critical Theory of Technology where an aesthetic understanding is suggested to alterour critical sense of how people today form meaningfulness by, through and withinformation technology. So, without neglecting other commonly held critical positions thispaper tentatively concludes that an understanding of the reflexive nature of informationtechnology in conjunction with the basic spirit behind the Frankfurt School empowercritical IS researchers with a new sensibility for what might constitute contemporary criticalconcerns.

  • 12.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Being-with Information Technology: Critical explorations beyond use and design2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the thesis a theoretical exploration concerning the significance of information technology in everyday life is conducted. The main question advanced is how the reflexive nature of information technology can be envisioned. By this question attention is directed to transformative, experiential and dynamic qualities of information technology,i.e. unknown mergers of information technology and human experience. It is tentatively suggested that it is within everyday life that such transformative abilities are due to be significant. That is, depending on if and how people experience otherness in their relationships with information technology different strategies and responses of being a part of the whole are achieved.

    The main purpose of the thesis is to establish a theoretical base that both reveals such reflexivity and allows for further studies of the significance of information technology in everyday life. An extended purpose is to provide the critical tradition of Informatics research with an alternative view on what might count as critical ideals as well as make some suggestions about what should be subject to further research within this tradition.

    The framework#being-with information technology#emerges as a result of my insistence on grasping the relationship between information technology and human experience as a whole. Informed primarily by Martin Heidegger’s %1977& thinking on technology the framework ascribes primacy to meaning-making and sense-making processes. The framework also aspire to reach beyond notions of use and design by emphasizing the role and importance of the potential of information technology to transform human experience in new and significant ways. This potential is referred to as information technology as lifeworlds. Throughout the thesis, information technology as lifeworlds is recognized in a number of ways. At the same time it is argued that this is a never-ending, dynamic, open,complex, and often contradictory object of study.

    It is suggested that a focus on aesthetic experiences entails the possibility to investigate ambiguous meanings of information technology, meanings that all are intrinsic to information technology, but so far has received little or no attention. This suggestion is also a move away from a view of information technology as an object, with certain features, qualities and properties, towards a view of information technology as a relation to the world, to itself,and towards being human.

  • 13.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Information Technology and the Question of the New2006In: 5th European workshop on Phenomenology, Organisation and Technology (POT) / [ed] Luca Introna, Fernando Ilharco & Eric Faÿ, Amsterdam, NL: University of Amsterdam , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Quality of Life and Information Technology: On becoming and responsibility in everyday life2008In: International Workshop: Good Life in a Technological Age: University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, June 12-14, 2008 / [ed] Philip Brey, Enschede, Netherlands: University of Twente, Netherlands , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Strange familiarity: on the material turn in feminism and HCI2011In: The 6th European conference on gender and ICT: feminist interventions in theories and practices / [ed] Croon Fors, A., Elovaara, P., & Mörtberg, C., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Beauty of the beast: the matter of meaning in digitalization2010In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization reveals the world in new varieties and forms. This power to unveil not only transforms human outreach and actions, but also changes our conceptions; about whom we are, about our uses and about human horizons for sense-making. In this paper, I explore experience design and the aesthetic turn in contemporary research in human–computer interaction and interaction design. This rather recent interest in aesthetic experience is in my view a move away from a view of digitalization as instances of objects aligned in networks, with certain features, qualities and properties, towards an understanding of digitalization as a relation to the world, to itself, and to what it means to be human (e.g. Technology and the character of contemporary life. A philosophical inquiry. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1984, Holding on to reality. The nature of information at the turn of the millennium. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1999; Questioning technology. Routledge, New York, 1999; The question concerning technology and other essays. Harper and Row, New York, 1977; Technology and the lifeworld, from garden to earth. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1990). As such my attempt in this text is to outline a conceptual account concerning what it might mean to designate digitalization as experienced rather than as what we traditionally think of it—as a cause of what we perceive. The paper is based on some previous work suggesting that a focus on the beauty of digitalization (i.e. the beast) entails the possibility to investigate ambiguous meanings of digitalization, meanings that are intrinsic to digitalization but have so far received little or no attention. My suggestion is that there are aesthetic and/or sublime dimensions inherent in digitalization that involves the realization of meaning that are becoming increasingly important in both use and design of digital materials. Hence, the particular focus on aesthetics as implied by the title of this text refers to a pervasive quality harbouring meaning that through a phenomenological lens could be regarded as the material basis of digitalization. The paper concludes that it is crucial to conduct more thorough studies of the relationship between aesthetics and digitalization if we are truly interested in exploring the potential of digitalization in our lives.

  • 17.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The ontology of the subject in digitalization2013In: Handbook of Research on Technolselves: Identity in a Technological Society / [ed] Rocci Luppicini, Hershey: IGI Global, 2013, Volume 1, p. 45-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is about the ontology of subjects in digitalization. Questions of ontology emerge as a response to contemporary concerns about the ways digitalization is transforming our lives. In this chapter the author’s suggestion is that any understanding of digitalization and its relationship to identity and/or subjectivity need to be considered within a more general horizon of ontology such as for instance suggested by post-representational views on the relationship between identity, self and technology (Badio 2006, Barad 2003; 2007; 2010, Heidegger 1977, Hekman 2010, Pickering 1995; 2011). The chapter highlights three broad principal responses characterizing contemporary entanglements of the self and digitalization contemporary life (Technoselves) – Disclosure, Performativity, and the Real. These three responses are each exploratory illustrated as well as theoretical bracketed by among others Heidegger’s thinking on technology (Heidegger 1977). The chapter tentatively concludes that contemporary digitali- zation brings the subject back to fundamental ways of existence—that of being-in-the-world (Heidegger, 1996/1927: 49–58). As such, the author contends that any considerations regarding the ontology of the subject in the digital age need to take serious non-modern stances on existence in the search for new imaginaries of the world and the subject’s becoming.

  • 18.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Beyond Use and Design: The dialectics of being in virtual worlds2002In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Innovation and gender in the making: A gendered analysis of technological performances at the stage2009In: 5th conference on Gender and ICT, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    IT-use in everyday life: From tool and media to lifeworld and being2002In: Proceedings of IRIS 25: New ways of working in IS, Bautahøj, Denmark, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Svedmark Ikonomidis, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Things and Devices in Everyday use of Information Technology2002In: Crossroads in Cultural Studies / [ed] Jussi Turtianinen, Miia Lähde, Elina Kokkoniemi-Haapanen, Tampere, Finland: Department of Sociology and Social Psychology , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Svedmark Ikonomidis, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Things and Devices in Everyday use of Information Technology2002In: Crossroads in Cultural Studies / [ed] Jussi Turtianinen, Miia Lähde, Elina Kokkoniemi-Haapanen, Tampere, Finland: Department of Sociology and Social Psychology , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Digital Materiality as Imprints and Landmarks: the case of Northern Lights2010In: International Journal of Information Ethics, ISSN 1614-1687, Vol. 12, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Critical HCI Research: a research position proposal2008In: Design Philosophy Papers, ISSN 1448-7136, E-ISSN 1448-7136, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing development of digital technology creates new, immensely complex environments that deeply influence our lifeworld. This paper is about the ways in which HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) research and other information technology disciplines can contribute to a deeper understanding of technology and the ongoing transformations or our lifeworld. As such, the paper is a conceptual exploration driven by a sincere striving for the possibility of making a real difference to the way research is carried out on the societal influences of digital technology. The paper is based on the assumption that htere are some foundational decisions forming any research endeavor: the question of methodology, the question of object of study and most importantly—the question of being in service. We explore and propose a research position by taking a critical stance against unreflective acceptance of digital technology and by acknowledging people's lifeworld as a core focus of inquiry. Te position is also framed around an empirical and theoretical understanding of the evolving technology that we label the digital transformation, in which an appreciation of aesthetic experience is regarded to be a focal methodological concept.

  • 25.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Information Technology and the Good Life2004In: Information Systems Research Relevant Theory and Informed Practice: 20th Years Retrospective: Relevant Theory and Informed Practice - Looking Forward from a 20-year Perspective on IS Research / [ed] Bonnie Kaplan, Duane P. Truex III, A. Trevor Wood-Harper and Janice I. DeGross, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2004, p. 687-692Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Thaidens, Theo
    et al.
    Fontys University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Regev, Gil
    Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Beard, Jon W.
    George Mason University, USA.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Book Review: Growing Wings on the Way: Systems Thinking for Messy Situations2012In: International Journal of Scoiotechnology and Knowledge Development, ISSN 1941-6253, EISSN 1941-6261, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 56-63Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 26 of 26
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