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  • 1.
    Hogstrom, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Retinol, retinol-binding-protein-4, abdominal fat mass, peak bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism in men: the NO2-studyManuscript (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Högström, M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Alfredson, H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lorentzon, R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Thorsen, K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Current physical activity is related to bone mineral density in males but not in females.2007In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Relationship between vitamin D metabolites and bone mineral density in young males: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.2006In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Retinol, retinol-binding protein 4, abdominal fat mass, peak bone mineral density, and markers of bone metabolism in men: the Northern Osteoporosis and Obesity (NO2) Study.2008In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 158, no 5, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: The association between retinol and bone mineral density (BMD) in males after puberty has not been fully investigated previously. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between retinol, retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4), BMD (g/cm(2)), abdominal fat mass, and markers of bone metabolism in young men. DESIGN: Longitudinal study. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-eight healthy males with a mean age of 22.6+/-0.7 years at baseline. A follow-up was conducted in 73 of the participants 2.0+/-0.4 years later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations between serum concentrations of retinol and RBP-4, and BMD of the total body, lumbar spine, and hip, serum concentrations of osteocalcin, and carboxy terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX), were investigated. RESULTS: Both retinol and RBP-4 showed an inverse relationship with that of osteocalcin (r=-0.23 to -0.25, P<0.05). Levels of RBP-4 (r=0.26, P=0.02) and osteocalcin (r=-0.23, P=0.04) were also related to abdominal fat mass, and the relationship between RBP-4, retinol, and osteocalcin disappeared after adjusting for this influence of abdominal fat mass. Neither retinol nor RBP-4 concentrations were associated with BMD at any site, CTX as baseline, or changes in BMD during the 2-year follow-up period. Levels of RBP-4 showed a strong association with levels of retinol (r=0.61, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: We found a negative association between the bone formation marker osteocalcin with retinol and RBP-4. The association disappeared when adjusting for the influence of abdominal fat mass. Neither retinol nor RBP-4 were associated with peak BMD in young men.

  • 5.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    n-3 Fatty acids are positively associated with peak bone mineral density and bone accrual in healthy men: the NO2 Study2007In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 803-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Knowledge of the influence of nutritional intake on bone health is limited. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been suggested to influence bone growth and modeling in humans, although data are sparse.

    Objective:The objective was to investigate the role of fatty acids in bone accumulation and the attainment of peak bone mass in young men.

    Design:The cohort studied consisted of 78 healthy young men with a mean age of 16.7 y at baseline. Bone mineral density (BMD; in g/cm2) of total body, hip, and spine was measured at baseline and at 22 and 24 y of age. Fatty acid concentrations were measured in the phospholipid fraction in serum at 22 y of age.

    Results:Concentrations of n−3 fatty acids were positively associated with total BMD (r = 0.27, P = 0.02) and spine BMD (r = 0.25, P = 0.02) at 22 y of age. A positive correlation between n−3 fatty acid concentrations and the changes in BMD at the spine (r = 0.26, P = 0.02) was found between 16 and 22 y of age. Concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n−3) were positively associated with total BMD (r = 0.32, P = 0.004) and BMD at the spine (r = 0.30, P = 0.008) at 22 y of age. A positive correlation was also found between DHA concentrations and the changes in BMD at the spine (r = 0.26, P = 0.02) between 16 and 22 y of age.

    Conclusion:The results showed that n−3 fatty acids, especially DHA, are positively associated with bone mineral accrual and, thus, with peak BMD in young men.

  • 6.
    Nordstrom, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Hogstrom, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Effects of different types of weight-bearing loading on bone mass and size in young males: a longitudinal studyManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Idrottsmedicin.
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Idrottsmedicin.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of different types of weight-bearing loading on bone mass and size in young males: A longitudinal study.2007In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Tervo, Taru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    The effect of physical activity on bone accrual, osteoporosis and fracture prevention2011In: Open Bone Journal, ISSN 1876-5254, no 3, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity has been recommended for the prevention and even treatment of osteoporosis because it potentially can increase bone mass and strength during childhood and adolescence and reduce the risk of falling in older populations. However, few reports have systematically investigated the effect of physical activity on bone in men and women of different ages.

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to review the literature relating to the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density in men and women of various ages.

    Method: This review systematically evaluates the evidence for the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density. Cochrane and Medline databases were searched for relevant articles, and the selected articles were evaluated.

    Results: The review found evidence to support the effectiveness of weight bearing physical activity on bone accrual during childhood and adolescence. The effect of weight bearing physical activity was site-specific. In contrast, the role of physical activity in adulthood is primarily geared toward maintaining bone mineral density. The evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on bone is not as solid as that for younger individuals.

    Conclusions: The effect of weight bearing physical activity is seen in sites that are exposed to loading. There also seems to be a continuous adaptive response in bone to loading. Additional randomized, controlled studies are needed to evaluate the effect of physical activity in the elderly.

  • 9. Stålman, Anders
    et al.
    Sköldenberg, Olof
    Martinez-Carranza, Nicolas
    Roberts, David
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Sports Medicine Umeå AB.
    Ryd, Leif
    No implant migration and good subjective outcome of a novel customized femoral resurfacing metal implant for focal chondral lesions2018In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 2196-2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Managing focal cartilage injuries in the middle-aged patient poses a challenge. Focal prosthetic inlay resurfacing has been proposed to be a bridge between biologics and conventional joint arthroplasty. Patient selection and accurate implant positioning is crucial to avoid increased contact pressure to the opposite cartilage surface. A customized femoral condyle implant for focal cartilage injuries was designed to precisely fit each patient’s individual size and location of damage. The primary objective was to assess implant safety profile, surgical usability of the implant and instruments, and implant migration with radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods: Ten patients 36–56 years with focal chondral defects, ICRS 3–4 of the femoral cartilage and failed earlier conservative or surgical interventions with VAS pain > 40. The patients were followed for 2 years with subjective outcome measures (VAS, EQ5D, KOOS) and RSA. The customized implant and guide instruments were manufactured by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques using MRI data. Results: VAS, EQ5D and KOOS showed improvements that reached significance for VAS (p ≤ 0.001), Tegner (p = 0.034) and the KOOS subscores ADL (p = 0.0048), sport and recreation (p = 0.034) and quality of life (p = 0.037). VAS and KOOS scores improved gradually at 3, 6 and 12 months. The improvements in EQ5D, KOOS pain and KOOS symptoms did not reach statistical significance. No infections, deep venous thrombosis or other complications occured in the postoperative period. No radiographic signs of damage to the opposing tibial cartilage was noted. The surgical usability of implants and instruments were good. RSA did not show any implant migration. Conclusion: This is the first clinical report of a new customized, focal knee resurfacing system. The short-term implant safety and patient-related outcome measures showed good-to-excellent results. Level of evidence: Prospective case series, Level 4.

  • 10.
    Wiklund, Peder
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Engström, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska universitetslaboratoriet, Klinisk kemi.
    Franks, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    High impact loading on the skeleton is associated with a decrease in glucose levels in young men2012In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 77, no 6, p. 823-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The skeleton has been suggested to be involved in energy metabolism through osteocalcin (OC), an osteoblast-specific molecule. The objective of this study was to investigate whether high impact exercise stimulating bone formation would lead to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism independent of cardiorespiratory effects, and if OC mediates this association.

    Design Prospective intervention study.

    Methods Fifty men aged 20-32 years were allocated to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group completed six different types of jumps in sets of five, with the frequency of these exercises gradually increasing over 8 weeks. At baseline and after 8 weeks, glycerol concentrations were measured in fat tissue as a marker of lipolysis by using microdialysis. Blood samples were assayed for OC and markers of glucose and lipid metabolism. Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer.

    Results After adjustment for confounders at baseline and changes in physical activity during the intervention period, the intervention was associated with a decrease in levels of glucose (p = 0.04), adrenalin (p = 0.03) and OC (p=0.04) after adjusting for baseline levels and changes in physical activity. No other differences between the groups were significant, although the trends of the metabolic variables favored the intervention group.

    Conclusions The results of this study suggest that high impact loading on the skeleton may affect glucose metabolism independent of the level of aerobic exercise.

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