umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bodén, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Shivappa, Nitin
    Hébert, James R
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

    METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

    RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

    CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

  • 2.
    Gylling, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Schneede, Jørn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Häggstrom, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ulvik, Arve
    Ueland, Per M.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Vitamin B-6 and colorectal cancer risk: a prospective population-based study using 3 distinct plasma markers of vitamin B-6 status2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 897-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Higher plasma concentrations of the vitamin B-6 marker pyridoxal 5#-phosphate (PLP) have been associated with reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Inflammatory processes, including vitamin B-6 catabolism, could explain such findings. Objective: We investigated 3 biomarkers of vitamin B-6 status in relation to CRC risk. Design: This was a prospective case-control study of 613 CRC cases and 1190 matched controls nested within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (n = 114,679). Participants were followed from 1985 to 2009, and the median follow-up from baseline to CRC diagnosis was 8.2 y. PLP, pyridoxal, pyridoxic acid (PA), 3-hydroxykynurenine, and xanthurenic acids (XAs) were measured in plasma with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We calculated relative and absolute risks of CRC for PLP and the ratios 3-hydroxykynurenine: XA (HK: XA), an inverse marker of functional vitamin B-6 status, and PA:(PLP + pyridoxal) (PAr), a marker of inflammation and oxidative stress and an inverse marker of vitamin B-6 status. Results: Plasma PLP concentrations were associated with a reduced CRC risk for the third compared with the first quartile and for PLP sufficiency compared with deficiency [OR: 0.60 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.81) and OR: 0.55 (95% CI: 0.37, 0.81), respectively]. HK: XA and PAr were both associated with increased CRC risk [OR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.02) and OR: 1.50 (95% CI: 1.10, 2.04), respectively] for the fourth compared with the first quartile. For HK: XA and PAr, the findings were mainly observed in study participants with,10.5 y of follow-up between sampling and diagnosis. Conclusions: Vitamin B-6 deficiency as measured by plasma PLP is associated with a clear increase in CRC risk. Furthermore, our analyses of novel markers of functional vitamin B-6 status and vitamin B-6-associated oxidative stress and inflammation suggest a role in tumor progression rather than initiation.

  • 3.
    Gylling, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ulvik, Arve
    Bevital AS, Laboratory building, Bergen, Norway.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen and Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Midttun, Øivind
    Bevital AS, Laboratory building, Bergen, Norway.
    Schneede, Jørn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 5, p. 68p. 947-956Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One-carbon metabolism biomarker are easily measured in plasma, but analyzing them one at a time in relation to disease does not take into account the interdependence of the many factors involved. The relative dynamics of major one-carbon metabolism branches can be assessed by relating the functional B-vitamin marker total homocysteine (tHcy) to transsulfuration (total cysteine) and methylation (creatinine) outputs.

    Objective: We validated the ratios of tHcy to total cysteine (Hcy:Cys), tHcy to creatinine (Hcy:Cre), and tHcy to cysteine to creatinine (Hcy:Cys:Cre) as functional markers of B-vitamin status. We also calculated the associations of these ratios to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

    Design: The relative contribution of potential confounders to the variance of the ratio-based B-vitamin markers was calculated by linear regression in a nested case-control study of 613 CRC cases and 1211 matched controls. Total B-vitamin status was represented by a summary score comprising Z-standardized plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin, betaine, pyridoxal 5´-phosphate, and riboflavin. Associations with CRC risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

    Results: The ratio-based B-vitamin markers all outperformed tHcy as markers of total B-vitamin status, in both CRC cases and controls. Associations with CRC risk were similar for the ratio-based B-vitamin markers and total B-vitamin status (approximately 25% lower risk for high versus low B-vitamin status).

    Conclusions: Ratio-based B-vitamin markers were good predictors of total B-vitamin status, and displayed similar associations with CRC risk. Since tHcy and creatinine are routinely clinically analyzed, Hcy:Cre could be easily implemented in clinical practice to aid interpretation of tHcy results.

  • 4.
    Harlid, Sophia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Replication of Epigenome-wide Associations Related to Body Mass Index Using the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip on Repeated Samples2017In: Genetic Epidemiology, ISSN 0741-0395, E-ISSN 1098-2272, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 680-680Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Harlid, Sophia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    The metabolic syndrome, inflammation and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation of large panels of plasma protein markers using repeated, prediagnostic samples2017In: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, article id 4803156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a set of metabolic risk factors including obesity, dysglycemia, and dyslipidemia, is associated with increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A putative biological mechanism is chronic, low-grade inflammation, both a feature of MetS and a CRC risk factor. However, excess body fat also induces a proinflammatory state and increases CRC risk. In order to explore the relationship between MetS, body size, inflammation, and CRC, we studied large panels of inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. We included 138 participants from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme with repeated sampling occasions, 10 years apart. Plasma samples were analyzed for 178 protein markers by proximity extension assay. To identify associations between plasma protein levels and MetS components, linear mixed models were fitted for each protein. Twelve proteins were associated with at least one MetS component, six of which were associated with MetS score. MetS alone was not related to any protein. Instead, BMI displayed by far the strongest associations with the biomarkers. One of the 12 MetS score-related proteins (FGF-21), also associated with BMI, was associated with an increased CRC risk (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.19–2.47). We conclude that overweight and obesity, acting through both inflammation and other mechanisms, likely explain the MetS-CRC connection.

  • 6. Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    et al.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Harrison, Tabitha A.
    Kang, Hyun Min
    Chen, Sai
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    Conti, David V.
    Qu, Conghui
    Jeon, Jihyoun
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Greenside, Peyton
    Wainberg, Michael
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Smith, Joshua D.
    Levine, David M.
    Nelson, Sarah C.
    Sinnott-Armstrong, Nasa A.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Alonso, M. Henar
    Anderson, Kristin
    Arnau-Collell, Coral
    Arndt, Volker
    Bamia, Christina
    Banbury, Barbara L.
    Baron, John A.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    Bezieau, Stephane
    Bishop, D. Timothy
    Boehm, Juergen
    Boeing, Heiner
    Brenner, Hermann
    Brezina, Stefanie
    Buch, Stephan
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea
    Butterbach, Katja
    Caan, Bette J.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Carlson, Christopher S.
    Castellvi-Bel, Sergi
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Cho, Sang Hee
    Connolly, Charles M.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Cuk, Katarina
    Curtis, Keith R.
    de la Chapelle, Albert
    Doheny, Kimberly F.
    Duggan, David
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Elias, Sjoerd G.
    Elliott, Faye
    English, Dallas R.
    Feskens, Edith J. M.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Fischer, Rocky
    FitzGerald, Liesel M.
    Forman, David
    Gala, Manish
    Gallinger, Steven
    Gauderman, W. James
    Giles, Graham G.
    Gillanders, Elizabeth
    Gong, Jian
    Goodman, Phyllis J.
    Grady, William M.
    Grove, John S.
    Gsur, Andrea
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Haile, Robert W.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Hampel, Heather
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hayes, Richard B.
    Hofer, Philipp
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    Hopper, John L.
    Hsu, Wan-Ling
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    Hudson, Thomas J.
    Hunter, David J.
    Ibanez-Sanz, Gemma
    Idos, Gregory E.
    Ingersoll, Roxann
    Jackson, Rebecca D.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Joshu, Corinne E.
    Keku, Temitope O.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Kim, Hyeong Rok
    Kobayashi, Emiko
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Kury, Sebastien
    Kweon, Sun-Seog
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Laurie, Cecelia A.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Leal, Suzanne M.
    Lee, Soo Chin
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Lemire, Mathieu
    Li, Christopher I.
    Li, Li
    Lieb, Wolfgang
    Lin, Yi
    Lindblom, Annika
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Ling, Hua
    Louie, Tin L.
    Mannisto, Satu
    Markowitz, Sanford D.
    Martin, Vicente
    Masala, Giovanna
    McNeil, Caroline E.
    Melas, Marilena
    Milne, Roger L.
    Moreno, Lorena
    Murphy, Neil
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Ogino, Shuji
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Pardini, Barbara
    Parfrey, Patrick S.
    Pearlman, Rachel
    Perduca, Vittorio
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Pinchev, Mila
    Platz, Elizabeth A.
    Prentice, Ross L.
    Pugh, Elizabeth
    Raskin, Leon
    Rennert, Gad
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Riboli, Elio
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Romm, Jane
    Sakoda, Lori C.
    Schafmayer, Clemens
    Schoen, Robert E.
    Seminara, Daniela
    Shah, Mitul
    Shelford, Tameka
    Shin, Min-Ho
    Shulman, Katerina
    Sieri, Sabina
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Stadler, Zsofia K.
    Stegmaier, Christa
    Su, Yu-Ru
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Thomas, Duncan C.
    Thomas, Sushma S.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Van den Berg, David J.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Kranen, Henk
    Vijai, Joseph
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Vodicka, Pavel
    Vodickova, Ludmila
    Vymetalkova, Veronika
    Weigl, Korbinian
    Weinstein, Stephanie J.
    White, Emily
    Win, Aung Ko
    Wolf, C. Roland
    Wolk, Alicja
    Woods, Michael O.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Zaidi, Syed H.
    Zanke, Brent W.
    Zhang, Qing
    Zheng, Wei
    Scacheri, Peter C.
    Potter, John D.
    Bassik, Michael C.
    Kundaje, Anshul
    Casey, Graham
    Moreno, Victor
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Nickerson, Deborah A.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Hsu, Li
    Peters, Ulrike
    Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer2019In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 76-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.

  • 7.
    Lundberg, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Zingmark, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Edin, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    MicroRNA expression in KRAS- and BRAF-mutated colorectal cancers2018In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 677-683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: KRAS and BRAF are two genes commonly mutated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Even though BRAF is a downstream target of KRAS in the MAPK signalling pathway, KRAS- and BRAF-mutated CRCs are found to display several different clinical and histopathological features. We investigated whether a differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) could explain the clinicopathological differences seen between KRAS-and BRAF-mutated CRCs.

    Materials and Methods: Using a PCR array, we analyzed the expression of 84 different miRNAs in CRC cell lines wild-type in KRAS and BRAF, or mutated in KRAS or BRAF.

    Results: Ten miRNAs were selected for further analyses in tumor tissue specimens (let-7a, let-7i, miR-10a, miR-10b, miR-31, miR-100, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-372, and miR-373). BRAF-mutated tumors were found to express significantly higher levels of miR-31 as well as significantly lower levels of miR-373, compared to wild-type tumors.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that KRAS and BRAF-mutated CRCs may have different miRNA signatures compared to CRC tumors wild-type in KRAS and BRAF. However, no difference in expression levels between KRAS-and BRAF-mutated tumors was evident for the miRNAs analyzed in this study.

  • 8. Moskal, Aurelie
    et al.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Byrnes, Graham
    Assi, Nada
    Fahey, Michael T.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Petersen, Kristina E. N.
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Plambeck Hansen, Camilla
    Affret, Aurelie
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Cadeau, Claire
    Kuhn, Tilman
    Katzke, Verena
    Iqbal, Khalid
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Naska, Androniki
    Masala, Giovanna
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, Bas H.
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Licaj, Idlir
    Skeie, Guri
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Huerta Castano, Jose M.
    Quiros, Jose R.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Molina-Portillo, Elena
    Winkvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, University of Gothenburg, PO Box 459, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Wareham, Nick
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Ward, Heather
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Slimani, Nadia
    Main nutrient patterns and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2016In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 115, no 11, p. 1430-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Much of the current literature on diet-colorectal cancer (CRC) associations focused on studies of single foods/nutrients, whereas less is known about nutrient patterns. We investigated the association between major nutrient patterns and CRC risk in participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Among 477 312 participants, intakes of 23 nutrients were estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Using results from a previous principal component (PC) analysis, four major nutrient patterns were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for the association of each of the four patterns and CRC incidence using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for established CRC risk factors. Results: During an average of 11 years of follow-up, 4517 incident cases of CRC were documented. A nutrient pattern characterised by high intakes of vitamins and minerals was inversely associated with CRC (HR per 1 s.d. = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.98) as was a pattern characterised by total protein, riboflavin, phosphorus and calcium (HR (1 s.d.) = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99). The remaining two patterns were not significantly associated with CRC risk. Conclusions: Analysing nutrient patterns may improve our understanding of how groups of nutrients relate to CRC.

  • 9. Murphy, Neil
    et al.
    Ward, Heather A.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Kvaskoff, Marina
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kühn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Borch, Kristin Benjaminsen
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Overvad, Kim
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Gil, Leire
    Huerta, José M.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ramón Quirós, J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Bradbury, Kathryn E.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Karakatsani, Anna
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fasanelli, Francesca
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Gylling, Björn
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jirström, Karin
    Berntsson, Jonna
    Xue, Xiaonan
    Riboli, Elio
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors by Anatomical Subsite in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1323-1331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Colorectal cancer located at different anatomical subsites may have distinct etiologies and risk factors. Previous studies that have examined this hypothesis have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because most studies have been of insufficient size to identify heterogeneous associations with precision.

    Methods: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, we used multivariable joint Cox proportional hazards models, which accounted for tumorsat different anatomical sites (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum) as competing risks, to examine the relationships between 14 established/suspected lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive/menstrual risk factors with colorectal cancer risk. Heterogeneity across sites was tested using Wald tests.

    Results: After a median of 14.9 years of follow-up of 521,330 men and women, 6291 colorectal cancer cases occurred. Physical activity was related inversely to proximal colon and distal colon cancer, but not to rectal cancer (P heterogeneity = .03). Height was associated positively with proximal and distal colon cancer only, but not rectal cancer (P heterogeneity = .0001). For men, but not women, heterogeneous relationships were observed for body mass index (P heterogeneity = .008) and waist circumference (P heterogeneity = .03), with weaker positive associations found for rectal cancer, compared with proximal and distal colon cancer. Current smoking was associated with a greater risk of rectal and proximal colon cancer, but not distal colon cancer (P heterogeneity = .05). No heterogeneity by anatomical site was found for alcohol consumption, diabetes, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and reproductive/menstrual factors.

    Conclusions: The relationships between physical activity, anthropometry, and smoking with colorectal cancer risk differed by subsite, supporting the hypothesis that tumors in different anatomical regions may have distinct etiologies.

  • 10.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Metabolic Risk Factors and Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease developing from distinct pathways, resulting in tumor subtypes with large differences in clinical and molecular characteristics. Molecular characteristics are increasingly being used clinically to guide therapy. However, whether molecular subtypes of CRC differ in etiology or risk factors is not clear. Clarifying such potential differences may lead to an improved understanding of CRC etiology, with implications for CRC prevention and screening.

    Aim: The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether risk factors related to energy metabolism, such as body fatness, and one-carbon metabolism, such as circulating B-vitamin status, were associated with specific subtypes of CRC defined by molecular characteristics of the tumor. 

    Methods: These prospective studies are based on data and blood samples from cohorts within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS). Prospective CRC cases with available archived tumor tissue were analyzed for key molecular features (KRAS and BRAF mutation status, Microsatellite instability (MSI) status, and CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) status). Paper I was a cohort study of metabolic factors related to the metabolic syndrome (117 687 participants). Paper II was a nested-case control study on circulating insulin resistance-markers and adipokines (1010 cases and 1010 matched controls). Papers III and IV were nested case-control studies of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants (613 cases and 1190 matched controls).

    Results: In paper I, we observed associations between metabolic factors, such as BMI, blood pressure, and blood lipids, and CRC risk consistent with previous studies. These associations were similar regardless of tumor KRAS and BRAF mutation status. In paper II, circulating biomarkers of insulin resistance and adipokines were not associated with the risk of CRC or specific molecular subtypes of CRC defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation or MSI status. In paper III, higher circulating levels of metabolites involved in the methionine cycle (namely, betaine and methionine) were associated with a lower CRC risk. In paper IV, we found no support for clear subtype-specific roles of any circulating one-carbon metabolism biomarker or genetic variants in CRC development.

    Conclusions: The result of these prospective studies suggests that metabolic factors related to energy metabolism and one-carbon metabolism are generally associated with the risk of CRC, regardless of major subtypes defined by key molecular tumor features. If causal, metabolic risk factors likely influence the risk of colorectal cancer through more than one carcinogenic pathway.

  • 11.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Zingmark, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfgren Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Metabolic factors and the risk of colorectal cancer by KRAS and BRAF mutation status2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 327-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors related to energy metabolism and the metabolic syndrome, such as higher body mass index (BMI), blood glucose, or blood lipids, and blood pressure, are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, CRC is a heterogeneous disease, developing through distinct pathways with differences in molecular characteristics and prognosis, and possibly also in risk factors. For subtypes defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation status, BMI is the only metabolic factor previously studied, with inconsistent findings. We investigated whether associations between BMI, blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure and CRC risk differed by tumor KRAS and BRAF mutation status in 117,687 participants from two population-based cohorts within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS). Hazard ratios (HRs) for overall CRC and CRC subtypes by metabolic factors were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regression, using multiple imputation to handle missing exposure and tumor data. During a median follow-up of 15.6 years, we acquired 1,250 prospective CRC cases, of which 766 cases had complete baseline and molecular tumor data. Consistent with previous evidence, higher BMI, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and blood pressure were associated with an increased risk of overall CRC (HRs per 1 standard deviation increase: 1.07 to 1.12). These associations were similar regardless of CRC subtype by KRAS and BRAF mutation status (all pheterogeneity > 0.05). The same was true for subtypes based on microsatellite instability status. Poor metabolic health may therefore be a universal mechanism for colorectal cancer, acting across multiple developmental pathways.

  • 12.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Meyer, Klaus
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0196233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, intracellular reactions involved in nucleotide synthesis and methylation, likely increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, results have been inconsistent. To explore whether this inconsistency could be explained by intertumoral heterogeneity, we evaluated a comprehensive panel of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to the risk of molecular subtypes of CRC defined by mutations in the KRAS and BRAF oncogenes. This nested case-control study included 488 CRC cases and 947 matched controls from two population-based cohorts in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We analyzed 14 biomarkers and 17 SNPs in prediagnostic blood and determined KRAS and BRAF mutation status in tumor tissue. In a multivariate network analysis, no variable displayed a strong association with the risk of specific CRC subtypes. A non-synonymous SNP in the CTH gene, rs1021737, had a stronger association compared with other variables. In subsequent univariate analyses, participants with variant rs1021737 genotype had a decreased risk of KRAS-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.50, 1.05), and an increased risk of BRAF-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.30), with weak evidence for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.01). This subtype-specific SNP association was not replicated in a case-case analysis of 533 CRC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (P = 0.85). In conclusion, we found no support for clear subtype-specific roles of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and SNPs in CRC development, making differences in CRC molecular subtype distributions an unlikely explanation for the varying results on the role of one-carbon metabolism in CRC development across previous studies. Further investigation of the CTH gene in colorectal carcinogenesis with regards to KRAS and BRAF mutations or other molecular characteristics of the tumor may be warranted.

  • 13.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Untangling the role of one-carbon metabolism in colorectal cancer risk: a comprehensive Bayesian network analysis2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 43434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of one-carbon metabolism (1CM), particularly folate, in colorectal cancer (CRC) development has been extensively studied, but with inconclusive results. Given the complexity of 1CM, the conventional approach, investigating components individually, may be insufficient. We used a machine learning-based Bayesian network approach to study, simultaneously, 14 circulating one-carbon metabolites, 17 related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and several environmental factors in relation to CRC risk in 613 cases and 1190 controls from the prospective Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. The estimated networks corresponded largely to known biochemical relationships. Plasma concentrations of folate (direct), vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-phosphate) (inverse), and vitamin B2 (riboflavin) (inverse) had the strongest independent associations with CRC risk. Our study demonstrates the importance of incorporating B-vitamins in future studies of 1CM and CRC development, and the usefulness of Bayesian network learning for investigating complex biological systems in relation to disease.

  • 14.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Components of One-carbon Metabolism Other than Folate and Colorectal Cancer Risk2016In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 787-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite extensive study, the role of folate in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Research has therefore begun to address the role of other elements of the folate-methionine metabolic cycles. This study investigated factors other than folate involved in one-carbon metabolism, i.e., choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, and methionine and relevant polymorphisms, in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a population with low intakes and circulating levels of folate.

    METHODS: This was a prospective case-control study of 613 case subjects and 1,190 matched control subjects nested within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We estimated odds ratios (OR) by conditional logistic regression, and marginal risk differences with weighted maximum likelihood estimation using incidence data from the study cohort.

    RESULTS: Higher plasma concentrations of methionine and betaine were associated with modest colorectal cancer risk reductions (OR [95% confidence interval {CI}] for highest versus lowest tertile: 0.76 [0.57, 0.99] and 0.72 [0.55, 0.94], respectively). Estimated marginal risk differences corresponded to approximately 200 fewer colorectal cancer cases per 100,000 individuals on average. We observed no clear associations between choline, dimethylglycine, or sarcosine and colorectal cancer risk. The inverse association of methionine was modified by plasma folate concentrations (OR [95% CI] for highest/lowest versus lowest/lowest tertile of plasma methionine/folate concentrations 0.39 [0.24, 0.64], Pinteraction = 0.06).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based, nested case-control study with a long follow-up time from baseline to diagnosis (median: 8.2 years), higher plasma concentrations of methionine and betaine were associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B83.

  • 15.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Zingmark, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Löfgren Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Metabolic biomarkers and the risk of molecular subtypes of colorectal cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body fatness measured as high body mass index (BMI) increase the risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanisms behind the relationship are not fully understood, but might include insulin resistance and changes in adipokine concentrations produced by adipose tissue. Yet, associations between circulating biomarkers related to these mechanisms and CRC risk have been somewhat inconsistent, possibly due to CRC heterogeneity. To better understand the role of insulin resistance and adipokines in CRC development, we therefore investigated circulating biomarkers related to these mechanisms in relation to molecular subtypes of CRC.

    Methods: This was a prospective case-control study of 1010 cases and 1:1 matched controls nested within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS). Concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, adiponectin, and leptin were quantified in prediagnostic plasma using immunoassays and related to CRC and CRC subtypes defined by mutations in BRAF and KRAS, and microsatellite instability (MSI) status analyzed in tumor tissue. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CRC by metabolic biomarker levels were calculated with conditional logistic regression.

    Results: Higher C-peptide and lower adiponectin were associated with an increased CRC risk (ORs per 1 standard deviation increase (95% CI): 1.11 (1.01, 1.23) and 0.91 (0.83, 1.00), respectively). The associations were attenuated when adjusting for BMI (ORs (95% CI): 1.07 (0.96, 1.19) and 0.93 (0.84, 1.03), respectively), with the potential exception of the association of C-peptide in women. Circulating insulin and leptin were not associated with CRC risk. We found no clear differences in the association between any biomarkers and CRC risk by molecular subtypes defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation status (Pheterogeneity>0.6), or MSI status (Pheterogeneity>0.3).

    Conclusion: Circulating biomarkers of insulin resistance and adipokines were not associated with CRC or specific molecular subtypes of CRC defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation or MSI status.

  • 16.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Circulating levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation, an analysis of repeated samples from a population based cohort2019In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 649-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA methylation in blood may adapt to conditions affecting our health, such as inflammation, and multiple studies have identified differential DNA methylation related to smoking, obesity and various diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate previously reported, and explore possible new, associations between levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation in blood. We used a well-characterized study population consisting of 127 individuals, all of whom were participants in the population-based Vasterbotten Intervention Programme cohort and had provided two blood samples, ten years apart. Levels of CRP and 160 other proteins were measured in plasma, and DNA methylation levels (assessed using the 850K Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip) were measured in white blood cell DNA. Associations between CpG methylation and protein levels were estimated using linear mixed models. In the study we were able to confirm the direction for 85 of 102 previously reported protein-methylation associations. Depicting associations in a network allowed us to identify CpG sites with associations to multiple proteins, and ten CpG sites were each associated with three or more inflammatory markers. Furthermore, two genetic regions included nine additional unreported CpG sites that may represent trans-acting methylation sites. Our study supports a complex interaction between DNA methylation and circulating proteins involved in the inflammatory response. The notion of trans-acting methylation sites affecting, or being affected by, the expression of genes on completely different chromosomes should be taken into account when interpreting results from epigenome-wide association studies.

  • 17. Nimptsch, Katharina
    et al.
    Song, Mingyang
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Freisling, Heinz
    Jenab, Mazda
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Chong, Dawn Q.
    Jensen, Majken K.
    Wu, Chunsen
    Overvad, Kim
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Barrdahl, Myrto
    Melander, Olle
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Panico, Salvatore
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Ramon Quiros, Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Travis, Ruth
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Severi, Gianluca
    Bonet, Catalina
    Palli, Domenico
    Janke, Juergen
    Lee, Young-Ae
    Boeing, Heiner
    Giovannucci, Edward L.
    Ogino, Shuji
    Fuchs, Charles S.
    Rimm, Eric
    Wu, Kana
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Pischon, Tobias
    Genetic variation in the ADIPOQ gene, adiponectin concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer: a Mendelian Randomization analysis using data from three large cohort studies2017In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher levels of circulating adiponectin have been related to lower risk of colorectal cancer in several prospective cohort studies, but it remains unclear whether this association may be causal. We aimed to improve causal inference in a Mendelian Randomization meta-analysis using nested case-control studies of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, 623 cases, 623 matched controls), the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, 231 cases, 230 controls) and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, 399 cases, 774 controls) with available data on pre-diagnostic adiponectin concentrations and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ADIPOQ gene. We created an ADIPOQ allele score that explained approximately 3% of the interindividual variation in adiponectin concentrations. The ADIPOQ allele score was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in logistic regression analyses (pooled OR per score-unit unit 0.97, 95% CI 0.91, 1.04). Genetically determined twofold higher adiponectin was not significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer using the ADIPOQ allele score as instrumental variable (pooled OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.40, 1.34). In a summary instrumental variable analysis (based on previously published data) with higher statistical power, no association between genetically determined twofold higher adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer was observed (0.99, 95% CI 0.93, 1.06 in women and 0.94, 95% CI 0.88, 1.01 in men). Thus, our study does not support a causal effect of circulating adiponectin on colorectal cancer risk. Due to the limited genetic determination of adiponectin, larger Mendelian Randomization studies are necessary to clarify whether adiponectin is causally related to lower risk of colorectal cancer.

  • 18.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bodén, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle behaviors are believed to influence the body's inflammatory state. Chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to the development of major non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inflammation may thus be an important link between lifestyle and disease. We evaluated self-reported physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption in relation to plasma levels of 160 validated inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. The study included 138 participants from a population-based cohort, all with repeated sampling of plasma and data ten years apart, allowing consideration of both intra- and inter-individual variation. Of 17 relationships identified, the strongest was an independent, positive association between cornulin (CRNN) and Swedish moist snuff (snus) use. We replicated the finding in a second cohort of 501 individuals, in which a dose-response relationship was also observed. Snus explained approximately one fifth of the variance in CRNN levels in both sample sets (18% and 23%). In conclusion, we identified a novel, independent, dose-dependent association between CRNN and snus use. Further study is warranted, to evaluate the performance of CRNN as a potential snus biomarker. The putative importance of lifestyle behaviors on a wide range of protein biomarkers illustrates the need for more personalized biomarker cut-offs.

  • 19.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Plasma ghrelin is probably not a useful biomarker for risk prediction or early detection of colorectal cancer2019In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 373-374Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    et al.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Peter, Raphael Simon
    Fritz, Josef
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Föger, Bernhard
    Concin, Hans
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Longitudinal study of body mass index, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension in 60,000 men and women in Sweden and Austria2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0197830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity is suggested to underlie development of other metabolic aberrations, but longitudinal relationships between metabolic factors at various ages has not been studied in detail. Methods: Data from 27,379 men and 32,275 women with in total 122,940 health examinations in the Västerbotten Intervention Project, Sweden and the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring and Prevention Programme, Austria were used to investigate body mass index (BMI), mid-blood pressure, and fasting levels of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol at baseline in relation to 10-year changes of these factors and weight. We included paired examinations performed 10 +/- 2 years apart and used them for longitudinal analysis with linear regression of changes between the ages 30 and 40, 40 and 50, or 50 and 60 years. Results: Higher levels of BMI were associated with increases in glucose and mid-blood pressure as well as triglycerides levels, and, to a lesser extent, decreases in cholesterol levels. For instance, per 5 kg/m(2) higher BMI at age 40, glucose at age 50 increased by 0.24 mmol/l (95%Cl:0.22-0.26) and mid-blood pressure increased by 1.54 mm Hg (95%Cl: 1.35-1.74). The strongest association observed was between BMI at age 30 and mid-blood pressure, which was 2.12 mm Hg (95% CI: 1.79-2.45) increase over ten years per 5 kg/m(2) higher BMI level. This association was observed at an age when blood pressure levels on average remained stable. Other associations than those with BMI at baseline were much weaker. However, triglyceride levels were associated with future glucose changes among individuals with elevated BMI, particularly in the two older age groups. Conclusion: BMI was most indicative of long-term changes in metabolic factors, and the strongest impact was observed for increases in blood pressure between 30 and 40 years of age. Our study supports that lifestyle interventions preventing metabolic aberrations should focus on avoiding weight increases.

  • 21.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Plasma miRNA can detect colorectal cancer, but how early?2018In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 1697-1705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of deaths worldwide but has a good prognosis if detected early. The need for efficient, preferable non‐ or minimally invasive, inexpensive screening tools is therefore critical. We analyzed 12 miRNAs in pre‐ and postdiagnostic plasma samples to evaluate their potential as CRC screening markers. We used a unique study design with two overlapping cohorts, allowing analysis of pre‐ and postdiagnostic samples from 58 patients with CRC and matched healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of miR‐15b, ‐16, ‐18a, ‐19a, 21, ‐22, ‐25, ‐26a, ‐29c, ‐142‐5p, ‐150, and ‐192 were measured by semi‐quantitative real‐time PCR. Concentrations of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 in plasma from patients with CRC were significantly altered compared to healthy controls. Combined as a multimarker panel, they detected CRC with an AUC of 0.93. Furthermore, levels of these three miRNAs also showed different levels in the prediagnostic case samples close to diagnosis. Only miR‐21‐levels were elevated several years before diagnosis. Plasma levels of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 show promise as screening biomarkers for CRC. However, based on our unique analysis of prediagnostic and postdiagnostic samples from the same patients, we conclude that circulating miRNAs elevated at diagnosis may not automatically be suitable for CRC screening, if the increase occurs too close to clinical diagnosis.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf