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  • 1. Meidtner, Karina
    et al.
    Podmore, Clara
    Kroger, Janine
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Bendinelli, Benedetta
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Dow, Courtney
    Ekblom, Kim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Huerta, Jose Maria
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Jenab, Mazda
    Katzke, Verena A.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay Tee
    Kuhn, Tilman
    Kyro, Cecilie
    Mancini, Francesca Romana
    Melander, Olle
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Quiros, J. Ramon
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Riboli, Elio
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Interaction of Dietary and Genetic Factors Influencing Body Iron Status and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Within the EPIC-InterAct Study2018In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Meat intake has been consistently shown to be positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Part of that association may be mediated by body iron status, which is influenced by genetic factors. We aimed to test for interactions of genetic and dietary factors influencing body iron status in relation to the risk of incident type 2 diabetes.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The case-cohort comprised 9,347 case subjects and 12,301 subcohort participants from eight European countries. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from genome-wide association studies on iron status biomarkers and candidate gene studies. A ferritin-related gene score was constructed. Multiplicative and additive interactions of heme iron and SNPs as well as the gene score were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression.

    RESULTS: Higher heme iron intake (per 1 SD) was associated with higher ferritin levels (β = 0.113 [95% CI 0.082; 0.144]), but not with transferrin (−0.019 [−0.043; 0.006]) or transferrin saturation (0.016 [−0.006; 0.037]). Five SNPs located in four genes (rs1799945 [HFE H63D], rs1800562 [HFE C282Y], rs236918 [PCK7], rs744653 [SLC40A1], and rs855791 [TMPRSS6V736A]) were associated with ferritin. We did not detect an interaction of heme iron and the gene score on the risk of diabetes in the overall study population (Padd = 0.16, Pmult = 0.21) but did detect a trend toward a negative interaction in men (Padd = 0.04, Pmult = 0.03).

    CONCLUSIONS: We found no convincing evidence that the interplay of dietary and genetic factors related to body iron status associates with type 2 diabetes risk above the level expected from the sum or product of the two individual exposures.

  • 2. Ward, Heather A.
    et al.
    Gayle, Alicia
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Merritt, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Kyrozis, Andreas
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Quiros, Jose Ramon
    Agudo, Antonio
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Larranaga, Nerea
    Huerta, Jose M.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Drake, Isabel
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Riboli, Elio
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2018In: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 379-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample sizes and heterogeneous tumour classifications. The aim of this study was to examine red meat, processed meat and iron intake in relation to glioma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. In this prospective cohort study, 408751 individuals from nine European countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine intake of red meat, processed meat, total dietary iron and haem iron in relation to incident glioma. During an average follow-up of 14.1 years, 688 incident glioma cases were diagnosed. There was no evidence that any of the meat variables (red, processed meat or subtypes of meat) or iron (total or haem) were associated with glioma; results were unchanged when the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded. This study suggests that there is no association between meat or iron intake and adult glioma. This is the largest prospective analysis of meat and iron in relation to glioma and as such provides a substantial contribution to a limited and inconsistent literature.

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