umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Iftimi, Adina
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cronie, Ottmar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Montes, Francisco
    Department of Statistics and Operations Research, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
    Second-order analysis of marked inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes: applications to earthquake data2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Statistics, ISSN 0303-6898, E-ISSN 1467-9469, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 661-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To analyse interactions in marked spatio-temporal point processes (MSTPPs), we introduce marked second-order reduced moment measures and K-functions for inhomogeneous second-order intensity reweighted stationary MSTPPs. These summary statistics, which allow us to quantify dependence between different mark-based classifications of the points, are depending on the specific mark space and mark reference measure chosen. Unbiased and consistent minus-sampling estimators are derived for all statistics considered and a test for random labelling is indicated. In addition, we treat Voronoi intensity estimators for MSTPPs. These new statistics are finally employed to analyse an Andaman sea earthquake data set.

  • 2.
    Iftimi, Adina
    et al.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Cronie, Ottmar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Montes, Francisco
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    The second-order statistical analysis of marked inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes2016In: METMA VIII: Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Spatio-Temporal Modelling / [ed] A. Iftimi, J. Mateu, F. Montes, 2016, p. 89-93Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An earthquake is characterised by the shaking of the surface of the Earth, and can range from being imperceptible to causing huge damage and killing thousands of people. Magnitude is a measure of the size of an earthquake source, and does not depend on the spatio-temporal location of the event. The data in this study includes all earthquakes with magnitude larger than or equal to 5, with a total of 1248 earthquakes registered from 2004 to 2008, in the area of Sumatra (Indonesia). We analyse the interaction between different types of earthquakes, classified according to their magnitude, at different space-time scales. We want to identify spatio-temporal interaction between high magnitude earthquakes (magnitude larger than 5:5) and smaller magnitude earthquakes ( 5:5). The analysis shows a strong relation between big earthquakes and aftershocks. We observe that aftershocks could span their power as far as 3,000 km and 400 days. Random labelling testing shows, as expected, that we do not have random labelling.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf