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  • 1.
    Hjärtström, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Distraction and facilitation: The impact of emotional sounds in an emoji oddball task2019In: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0252, E-ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional stimuli are argued to capture attention and consume attentional resources differently depending on their emotionalcontent. The present study investigates the impact of the automatic detection of unexpected and to-be-ignored emotional stimuli onhuman behavioral responses, and aims to unravel the differences in distraction between two negative emotional stimuli: sadness and anger.Forty participants (Mage= 25.5 years) performed a visual categorization task where angry and sad emoji faces were presented after eithera standard neutral tone (in 80% of trials) or a deviant emotional sound (tone changing in pitch; sad or angry sound in 10% of trials each)that was to be ignored. Deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., sad sound—sad face) or incongruent (e.g., angry sound—sad face).Although the stimuli presented to the participants were brief and to-be-ignored, results indicate that participants were significantly moredistracted by sad compared to angry stimuli (seen as prolonged response times). Findings are discussed with reference to the nature ofthe two negative emotions.

  • 2.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hjärtström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Impact of Emotional Deviant Sounds on Emoji Faces in a Sustained Attention Task2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The involuntary shift of attention to emotional sounds were investigated in a cross-modal oddball task in which participants categorized angry and disappointed emoji faces. Prior to each face, a standard tone was presented (80% of trials) or a deviant “disappointed” or a buzzing “angry” sound (20% of trials). The deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., disappointed sound/disappointed emoji) or incongruent trials (e.g., a disappointed sound/angry emoji). Results showed that the emotional content of the deviant sounds interacted with the processing of the faces, but that the effect was only present in the congruent trials. Participants showed deviance distraction (prolonged response times compared to standard) in the disappointed trials and facilitation (no deviance distraction) in the angry deviant trials. The facilitation (or lack of distraction) caused by the angry deviant sound in the congruent trial may have been a result of an arousal effect due to the processing of threat.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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Citation style
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  • Other style
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