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  • 1. Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    et al.
    Appleby, Paul N.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Gil, Leire
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Murphy, Neil
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Luben, Robert N.
    Gislefoss, Randi E.
    Langseth, Hilde
    Drake, Isabel
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Wallström, Peter
    Stattin, Pär
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Ozasa, Kotaro
    Tamakoshi, Akiko
    Mikami, Kazuya
    Kubo, Tatsuhiko
    Sawada, Norie
    Tsugane, Shoichiro
    Key, Timothy J
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Circulating isoflavone and lignan concentrations and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of individual participant data from seven prospective studies including 2828 cases and 5593 controls2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 11, p. 2677-2686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoestrogens may influence prostate cancer development. This study aimed to examine the association between pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, equol) and lignans (enterolactone and enterodiol) and the risk of prostate cancer. Individual participant data were available from seven prospective studies (two studies from Japan with 241 cases and 503 controls and five studies from Europe with 2,828 cases and 5,593 controls). Because of the large difference in circulating isoflavone concentrations between Japan and Europe, analyses of the associations of isoflavone concentrations and prostate cancer risk were evaluated separately. Prostate cancer risk by study-specific fourths of circulating concentrations of each phytoestrogen was estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. In men from Japan, those with high compared to low circulating equol concentrations had a lower risk of prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted OR for upper quartile [Q4] vs Q1=0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.39-0.97), although there was no significant trend (OR per 75 percentile increase=0.69, 95 CI=0.46-1.05, Ptrend =0.085); Genistein and daidzein concentrations were not significantly associated with risk (ORs for Q4 vs Q1=0.70, 0.45-1.10, and 0.71, 0.45-1.12, respectively). In men from Europe, circulating concentrations of genistein, daidzein and equol were not associated with risk. Circulating lignan concentrations were not associated with the risk of prostate cancer, overall or by disease aggressiveness or time to diagnosis. There was no strong evidence that pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones or lignans are associated with prostate cancer risk, although further research is warranted in populations where isoflavone intakes are high.

  • 2. Schillemans, Tessa
    et al.
    Shi, Lin
    Liu, Xin
    Akesson, Agneta
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brunius, Carl
    Visualization and Interpretation of Multivariate Associations with Disease Risk Markers and Disease Risk-The Triplot2019In: Metabolites, ISSN 2218-1989, E-ISSN 2218-1989, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolomics has emerged as a promising technique to understand relationships between environmental factors and health status. Through comprehensive profiling of small molecules in biological samples, metabolomics generates high-dimensional data objectively, reflecting exposures, endogenous responses, and health e ff ects, thereby providing further insights into exposure-disease associations. However, the multivariate nature of metabolomics data contributes to high complexity in analysis and interpretation. E ffi cient visualization techniques of multivariate data that allow direct interpretation of combined exposures, metabolome, and disease risk, are currently lacking. We have therefore developed the ` triplot' tool, a novel algorithm that simultaneously integrates and displays metabolites through latent variable modeling (e. g., principal component analysis, partial least squares regression, or factor analysis), their correlations with exposures, and their associations with disease risk estimates or intermediate risk factors. This paper illustrates the framework of the ` triplot' using two synthetic datasets that explore associations between dietary intake, plasma metabolome, and incident type 2 diabetes or BMI, an intermediate risk factor for lifestyle-related diseases. Our results demonstrate advantages of triplot over conventional visualization methods in facilitating interpretation in multivariate risk modeling with high-dimensional data. Algorithms, synthetic data, and tutorials are open source and available in the R package ` triplot'.

  • 3. Sen, Abhijit
    et al.
    Papadimitriou, Nikos
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Murphy, Neil
    Gunter, Marc
    Freisling, Heinz
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    Muller, David C.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Lopez, David S.
    Bergmann, Manuela
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bamia, Christina
    Kotanidou, Anastasia
    Karakatsani, Anna
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Outzen, Malene
    Redondo, Maria-Luisa
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Larranaga, Nerea
    Tumino, Rosario
    Grioni, Sara
    Palli, Domenico
    Caini, Saverio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wallström, Peter
    Drake, Isabel
    Bech, Bodil Hammer
    Overvad, Kim
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Riboli, Elio
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 240-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages.

  • 4. Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    Mhd Omar, Nor Adila
    Brunius, Carl
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Andersson, Sven-Olof
    Larsson, Anders
    Åman, Per
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Consumption of whole grain/bran rye instead of refined wheat decrease concentrations of TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin in an exploratory study in men with prostate cancer2020In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Rye consumption has shown beneficial effects on prostate cancer tumors, as indicated by slower initial tumor growth in animal models and lowering of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in humans. This study evaluated the effects of whole grain/bran rye consumption on low-grade inflammation and endothelial function biomarkers in men with prostate cancer.

    METHODS: Seventeen men with untreated, low-grade prostate cancer consumed 485 g rye whole grain and bran products (RP) per day or refined wheat products with added cellulose (WP) in a randomized crossover design. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment.

    RESULTS: Concentrations of tumor nuclear factor-receptor 2 (TNF-R2), e-selectin, and endostatin were significantly lower after consumption of the RP diet compared with WP (p < 0.05). Cathepsin S concentration was positively correlated to TNF-R2 and endostatin concentrations across all occasions. Strong correlations were consistently found between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). No effect of intervention was found in 92 inflammation-related protein biomarkers measured in a proximity extension assay.

    CONCLUSIONS: RP diet lowered TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin, compared with WP in men with prostate cancer. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in PSA.

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