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  • 1.
    Fallan, Kjetil
    et al.
    University of Oslo.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Environmental histories of design: towards a new research agenda2017In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 103-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design and designers hold an ambiguous place in contemporary environmental discourse. They can easily be blamed for causing environmental problems but may also be said to possess some of the competences that could help solve those problems. Design is a fundamental part of the world, where rapidly emerging concepts such as the Anthropocene challenge the distinction between the human-made (or artificial) on the one side and what is not made by human hands (or natural), on the other. Despite the long-standing centrality of design to environmental discourse, and vice versa, deep and systematic ‘environmental histories of design’ are few and far between. While environmental historians have increasingly explored technology, consumption, and material culture as active agents in discourses of environmental change, they seldom explicitly incorporate design or designers into their studies. At the same time, design history faces a major challenge in accounting for environmental concerns in the history of design discourse. This special issue explores the common ground emerging at the intersection of these two fields of inquiry, with the aim of establishing mutually beneficial understandings upon which to build a new interdisciplinary research agenda.

  • 2.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    A History of Water: Volume 1: Water Control and River Biographies. Volume 2: The Political Economy of Water. Volume 3: The World of Water.2008In: Environmental History, ISSN 1084-5453, E-ISSN 1930-8892, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 569-571Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    A Pocket History of Bottle Recycling2013In: The AtlanticArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Annotated Landscapes: Transforming Location Awareness Through Digital Personal Navigation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Beverages2012In: Encyclopedia of Waste and Consumption: The Social Science of Garbage / [ed] Carl Zimring and William Rathje, London: Sage Publications, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Bilsamhället: ideologi, expertis och regelskapande i efterkrigstidens Sverige by Per Lundin2009In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 714-715Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Build-it-yourself to pre-built: salvage practices in Norwegian leisure cabin construction2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Cabin Porn for Digital Humanists2013In: Infrastructure, Space and Media: A Book from the Media Places Symposium in Umeå December 5-7, 2012, Peter Wallenberg Foundation , 2013, p. 53-54Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Christine Myrvang: forbruksagentene: slik vekket de kjøpelysten2010In: Historisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0018-263X, E-ISSN 1504-2944, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 639-643Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Coca-Cola Bottle, USA: (Earl R. Dean, 1915)2014In: Iconic Designs: 50 Stories About 50 Things / [ed] Grace Lees-Maffei, Bloomsbury , 2014, p. 218-221Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Cold War Kitchen: Americanization, Technology, and European Users. Edited by Ruth Oldenziel and Karin Zachmann. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2009. Pp. viii+415. $36.2010In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 515-516Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Consumers, convenience, and citizenship: Scandinavian packaging recycling in the 20th century2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Den første hyttekrisa: Samfunnsplanlegging, naturbilder og allmenningens tragedie2011In: Norske hytter i endring: Om bærekraft og behag / [ed] Helen Jøsok Gansmo, Thomas Berker och Finn Arne Jørgensen, Trondheim: Tapir Universitetsforlag , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Designing a Hole in the Wall: The Reverse Vending Machine as Socio-Technical System and Environmental Infrastructure2012In: Scandinavian Design: Alternative Histories / [ed] Kjetil Fallan, Berg Publishers, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Does the Empire recycle?: Waste and scrap recycling in the Star Wars movies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Fifty Shades of Green2013Other (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Frankfurt Kitchen, Germany: (Grete Lihotsky, 1926)2014In: Iconic Designs: 50 Stories About 50 Things / [ed] Grace Lees-Maffei, Bloomsbury , 2014, 1, p. 164-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Green citizenship at the recycling junction: consumers and infrastructures for the recycling of packaging in twentieth-century Norway2013In: Contemporary European History, ISSN 0960-7773, E-ISSN 1469-2171, Vol. 22, no 3/suppl. 1, p. 499-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the making of the Norwegian recycling consumer-citizen by discussing recycling as both a cultural activity – an expression of environmentalist sentiment, an everyday habit and a social expectation – and a technological infrastructure consisting of disposal stations, legal frameworks, transportation systems and the recycling technologies themselves. Using a concept of ‘recycling junctions’ as a means of understanding historical recycling processes, the article focuses on beverage packaging to argue that effective recycling in the modern green state depends on a combination of technologically mediated convenience and green consumer-citizenship, involving a wide range of actors.

  • 19.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    H-Environment Roundtable, Seeing Green: Review of Finis Dunaway, Seeing Green: The Use and Abuse of American Environmental Images (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015). ISBN: 97802261699032016In: H-EnvironmentArticle, book review (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hunting in a digital landscape: Scandinavian hunters and the history of the GPS2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how hunters have integrated digital mapping and GPS units in their hunting practices. The act of navigating a landscape, of being able to place yourself, your quarry, your fellow hunters, and your dogs in a mental representation of the world around you has long been a critical skill for hunters, one that requires use of all the senses. This way of interacting with nature has been a key element in narratives about hunting. In the last decade, however, digital and geolocative technologies have become far more common in hunting, enabling hunters to see their exact location, as well as their dogs, on a handheld GPS unit. Taking as its starting point how Scandinavian hunters have a long tradition of actively reflecting on their own practices, the paper will examine what kinds of discussions the hunters had surrounding the introduction of GPS tracking and other communication technologies, as well as how they have been implemented in the field.

    The paper acknowledges that hunting practices deeply embedded in larger structures and traditions, such as the allotment of hunting rights, and of historical transitions from hunting as a sustenance strategy to a leisure activity. The paper will discuss what influence geolocative technologies have had on the relationship between local and non-local (urban or international) hunters and how they have changed the dynamics and landscape use of hunting. While it can be argued that Swedish hunters generally hunt in local areas that they know rather well, it could also be that they enable hunters to navigate new and to them unknown landscapes. Hunters may also interact with nature, each other, and their hunting equipment such as dogs in novel ways with GPS.

    The talk will deepen the study of technology in hunting through analyzing the circulating relationship between one particular set of digital technologies and the knowledge and practice of hunting. In general, histories of hunting tend to pay much attention to weapons and their development from the dawn of time until present, but spends far less time on exploring the role of the other technologies. The general descriptions of technology to a large degree align with what historians of technology classify as internalistc studies of technology; chronological stories of changes in technical details with little regard for the interaction between technology, culture, and society at large. 

  • 21.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Internet of Things2016In: A new companion to digital humanities / [ed] Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016, p. 42-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Keep America Beautiful2010In: Encyclopedia of American Environmental History / [ed] Kathleen Brosnan, New York: Facts on File , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Making a green machine: the infrastructure of beverage container recycling2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consider an empty bottle or can, one of the hundreds of billions of beverage containers that are discarded worldwide every year. Empty containers have been at the center of intense political controversies, technological innovation processes, and the modern environmental movement. Making a Green Machine examines the development of the Scandinavian beverage container deposit-refund system, which has the highest return rates in the world, from 1970 to present. Finn Arne Jørgensen investigates the challenges the system faced when exported internationally and explores the critical role of technological infrastructures and consumer convenience in modern recycling. His comparative framework charts the complex network of business and political actors involved in the development of the reverse vending machine (RVM) and bottle deposit legislation to better understand the different historical trajectories empty beverage containers have taken across markets, including the U.S. The RVM has served as more than a hole in the wall - it began simply as a tool for grocers who had to handle empty refillable glass bottles, but has become a green machine to redeem the empty beverage container, helping both business and consumers participate in environmental actions.

  • 24.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Night at the cabin: electricity and the experience of darkness in Norwegian leisure cabins, 1950 – 20002011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The leisure cabin is a deeply entrenched structure in Norwegian nature and culture. Close to half a million cabins dot the countryside in a nation of less than five million inhabitants. The cabin lifestyle is also rooted in history and tradition, in an idea of escaping from the stress of urban life to relax and “recharge one’s batteries” in nature. While this sounds anti-modern, cabin owners have eagerly adopted modern comfort technologies in order to make cabin living more convenient.

     

    This paper will explore the historical changes in the experience of night at the cabin, particularly focusing on the tensions between “artificial” electric light and “natural” darkness. Pitch-black nights, natural sounds, and starry night skies are important elements in the national mythology of authentic cabin living, yet these natural experiences has all but disappeared for a majority of cabin owners today. In many cabin developments, the light and noise pollution from electrical devices have more in common with suburbia than with the mythical isolated cabin in the remote wilderness.

     

    The question of electrical light thus leads us to consider Norwegians’ attitude toward nature and how it has changed since the early 1950s. This development reminds us how cabins and urban homes, and nature and culture are tightly connected.

  • 25.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Recycling2010In: Encyclopedia of American Environmental History / [ed] Kathleen Brosnan, New York: Facts on File , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Scandinavia2012In: Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste: The Social Science of Garbage / [ed] Carl Zimring and William Rathje, London: Sage Publications, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Screens as windows to nature: the digital humanities meet the environmental humanities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our ideas and experiences of nature have become entangled with digital media in interesting and sometimes unexpected ways over the last few decades. Using Google Street View’s digital, screen-based mediation of Grand Canyon as a starting point, I will discuss where the tools, methods, and research agendas of the digital humanities and the environmental humanities meet. Both of these interdisciplinary fields are in rapid growth and are often invoked in discussions about the relevance and future of the humanities. What can we find of value where the two fields meet?

  • 28.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Space, place, and mobility in museums2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Technologically Mediated Landscapes and the Digital Panoramic: Revisiting Wolfgang Schivelbusch’s Railway Journey in the Digital Age2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Armchair Traveler’s Guide to Digital Environmental Humanities2014In: Environmental Humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 4, p. 95-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technological mediation of near and distant landscapes have long fascinated scholars and the public alike, and it seems like this interest peaks around times of large-scale technological transition, when new modes of both transportation and mediation become available. Few scholars have analyzed this relationship between technology, media, and the perception of landscape as convincingly as Wolfgang Schivelbusch, who famously argued that the landscape perceived by travelers was filtered through the machine ensemble of the railroad system. This article brings Schivelbusch’s thesis into the digital age as a way of examining the spatiality of digital media and the natural world. The article analyzes a series of technologically mediated digital representations of travel and movement through landscapes, in particular the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation’s “slow travel” series of digitally enhanced TV programs. These highly popular mediations of railroad or boat travel challenge Schivelbusch’s ideas of speed, distance, and experience of landscapes, but also direct our attention towards the role of digital media in making sense of a changing world.

  • 31.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Backbone of Everyday Environmentalism: Cultural Scripting and Technological Systems2013In: New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies / [ed] Dolly Jørgensen, Finn Arne Jørgensen, and Sara B. Pritchard, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013, p. 69-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 by J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke (review)2017In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 623-624Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Infrastructure of nature: leisure cabins and the built environment in Norway, 1850-20002011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavians like to think of themselves as being particularly close to nature. Identifying exactly what this nature is, however, is tricky. This paper historicizes the making of Norwegian nature by following the leisure cabin from 1850 until present. Cabins serve as gateways to nature for Norwegians, but have also permanently altered and influenced what we think of as natural. This paper examines how the infrastructures connecting people to cabins and to scenic landscapes have now become an integrated part of the Norwegian landscape. Large parts of Norway’s nature cannot be experienced outside of this infrastructure; at the same time, it is precisely through using this infrastructure Norwegians have come to know and appreciate nature. In conclusion, the paper will argue that sustainable environmental management should consider the history of how we have come to use and experience nature, but not look back to an idea of pristine, untouched nature for solutions.

  • 34.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Internet Is Obsessed With a Video Feed of Bears Eating Salmon2016In: The AtlanticArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Networked North: Thinking about the Past, Present, and Future of Environmental Histories of the North2013In: Northscapes: History, Technology, and the Making of Northern Landscapes / [ed] Dolly Jørgensen & Sverker Sörlin, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Norwegian leisure cabin and the infrastructure of nature2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Invite keynote talk

  • 37.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Towards an online environmental history of Europe: narratives and forms of presentation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A roundtable presentation on the use of digital maps in environmental history scholarship.

  • 38.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Using blended learning to develop a signature pedagogy for teaching history of technology2013In: Reformation, revolution, evolution: universitetslärandet ur ett tidsperspektiv / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2013, p. 51-68Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    What Happens to a Place When the Data About It Is Lost?2014In: The AtlanticArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    What It Means That Urban Hipsters Like Staring at Pictures of Cabins2012In: The Atlantic, no Mars 16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A generation of hipsters has contracted cabin fever. The Cabin Porn website has become one of these internet hits, spreading through blogs, Facebook posts, tumblr reposts, Twitter mentions, and so on. Why can't all these people stop looking at cabins? What is the allure? Put simply, Cabin Porn is visual stimulation of the urge for a simpler life in beautiful surroundings. Commenters are likening it to "channeling your inner Thoreau." Cabin Porn represents the return of the homesteader, living off the grid, self-sufficient and self-reliant.  

  • 41.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Why Look at Cabin Porn?2015In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 557-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of cabin porn—images of beautiful cabins in nature—as a visual genre reflects a growing international interest in cabins, shedworking, and rustic, exurban living off the grid, most of it romanticizing rural and low-tech lifestyles. On the surface, the digitally mediated and disembodied architecture of cabin porn seems to be a form of nostalgia, where the dream of the cabin becomes an arena for resolving an ambivalent relationship to technology and all the bothersome things of modern life. Delving deeper into the cabin porn phenomenon, however, can also reveal something about the mediated experience of nature through digital media.

  • 42.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gansmo, Helen JøsokBerker, Thomas
    Norske hytter i endring: Om bærekraft og behag2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [no]

    Hytta er et fristed, et familiested og en måte å være i naturen på – men den kan også være en stressfaktor, et strengt regulert sosialt felt og et økende miljøproblem.

    Hva kan hyttelivet fortelle om samspillet mellom samfunn og teknologi? Hvordan påvirkes det moderne hyttelivet av muligheten til å drive et aktivt friluftsliv? Hva er drivkreftene bak hytteutviklingen, og hvilke konsekvenser skaper de nye fritidsboligene for naturen, for samfunnet rundt og for måten vi lever på?

    Denne boken diskuterer disse spørsmålene. Engasjerte forskere fra mange fagfelt utforsker våre oppfatninger om den norske hytta, motsetningene som kan oppstå mellom dem, og hvordan vi kan forstå forholdet mellom hytter, miljø og samfunnsutvikling bedre.

  • 43.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Jørgensen, DollyUmeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.Pritchard, Sara BCornell University.
    New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New Natures broadens the dialogue between the disciplines of science and technology studies (STS) and environmental history in hopes of deepening and even transforming understandings of human-nature interactions. The volume presents historical studies that engage with key STS theories, offering models for how these theories can help crystallize central lessons from empirical histories, facilitate comparative analysis, and provide a language for complicated historical phenomena. Overall, the collection exemplifies the fruitfulness of cross-disciplinary thinking.

  • 44.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Jørgensen, Dolores Marie
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The Anthropocene as a History of Technology: Welcome to the Anthropocene: The Earth in Our Hands, Deutsches Museum, Munich2016In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 231-237Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsdóttir, Unnur Birna
    East Island Heritage Museum.
    Mårald, Erland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Poulsen, Bo
    Aalborg University.
    Räsänen, Tuomas
    University of Helsinki.
    Entangled Environments: Historians and Nature in the Nordic Countries2013In: Historisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0018-263X, E-ISSN 1504-2944, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 9-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses recent developments in Nordic environmental history scholarship in light of the concept of the Anthropocene. Taking nature and culture as entangled with each other, the article explores questions of definitions, disciplinary knowledge and the need for interdisciplinarity, and the problem of national, spatial and temporal boundaries in environmental history. Both natural spaces and the scientific knowledge we have about nature need to be historicized. The article concludes with a look to the future of Nordic environmental history.

1 - 45 of 45
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