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  • 1.
    De Veirman, Sofie
    et al.
    History Department, Ghent Univeristy .
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Deaf and unwanted?: marriage characteristics of deaf people in eighteenth and nineteenth-century Belgium: a comparative and cross-regional approach2016In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 241-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the marriage characteristics of deaf men and women born in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Belgium are compared to each other, as well as to a group of non-deaf siblings and a group of Swedish deaf persons. The aim is to determine the extent to which the marriage pattern of deaf persons lined up with that of non-disabled persons and to see how experiences of disablement interacted with the environment in which persons dwelt. This article challenges the belief in a universal disability experience by arguing that although deaf individuals generally encountered more difficulties in finding a marriage partner, marriage chances were significantly dependent on personal characteristics such as gender, living environment and birth date. As such, we demonstrate that the relationship between being deaf and being vulnerable on the marriage market was not an inescapable one, but the product of specific environments.

  • 2.
    Haage, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gendered death risks among disabled individuals in sweden: A case study of the 19th-century Sundsvall region2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 160-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study follows around 500 disabled individuals over their lifespan to examine their risks of dying in 19th-century society, in comparison to a reference group of non-disabled people. The aim is to detect whether people, due to their disability, had a higher probability of meeting an untimely death. We use Sweden’s 19th-century parish registers to identify people the ministers defined as disabled, and to construct a reference group of individuals who were not affected by these disabilities. By combining the deviance theories from sociology studies with demographic sources and statistical methods, we achieve new insight into how life developed for disabled people in past societies. The results suggest that disability significantly jeopardized the survival of individuals, particularly men, but also that the type of disability had an impact. Altogether, we can demonstrate that the disabled constituted a disadvantaged but heterogeneous group of people whose demography and life courses must be further researched.

  • 3.
    Haage, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Opportunities of Work and Family in Young Disabled People’s Lives: A Comparative Study of Disabled and Non-disabled Young Adults in Nineteenth-century Northern Sweden Using Sequence Analysis2016In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods (LaCOSA II) / [ed] Gilbert Ritschard and Matthias Studer, Lausanne: Université de Lausanne , 2016, p. 93-102Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     This study focuses on young adults with disabilities and their pathways towards work and family in past society. The aim is to explore their life trajectories and compare them to a non-disabled group of people who experienced the same time-space context, represented by the 19th-century Sundsvall region, Sweden. We employ sequence analyses on a series of demographic events that were to occur in the life of young adults: first occupation, marriage and parenthood. We also check for the events of death and out-migration. Disability studies show that disabled people were often subject to stigmatization caused by their impairment and prevailing perceptions about normalcy in in society. This would have limited their opportunities of work and family compared to non-disabled persons. Individual-level data consisting of parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base (DDB), Umeå University, Sweden, allow sequence analysis that helps to answer the questions of whether and how disability influenced people’s life trajectories. We obtain a holistic picture of how their life developed that suggests that disability substantially limited people’s opportunities to find job, marry and form a family. This indicates that a stigma was associated with disability beyond the impairment itself and worked to add to disabled individuals’ difficulties in both the labor market and marriage market.

  • 4.
    Haage, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Disabled and unmarried?: Marital chances among disabled people in nineteenth-century northern Sweden2017In: Essays in Economic & Business History, ISSN 0896-226X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 207-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To marry and form a household of one's own was the expected life course of most people in the nineteenth century, but little is known about whether individuals with disabilities shared the same demographic experience of marriage as non-disabled did. This study examines this issue by analyzing the marital chances of a group of disabled people—i.e. blind, deaf mute, crippled and with mental disabilities—compared with a non-disabled reference group. Our results show that about a quarter of the disabled individuals did marry, even though their marital propensities were significantly lower than those of non-disabled people. These propensities also differed by gender and type of disability. We suggest that the lower marital chances and the variation we found within the group of disabled people indicate the level of social exclusion they faced in society.

  • 5.
    Sandström, Glenn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sex preference for children in German villages during the fertility transition2015In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past, parents' sex preferences for their children have proved difficult to verify. This study used John Knodel's German village genealogies of couples married between 1815 and 1899 to investigate sex preferences for children during the fertility transition. Event history analyses of couples' propensity to progress to a fifth parity was used to test whether the probability of having additional children was influenced by the sex composition of surviving children. It appears that son preference influenced reproductive behaviour: couples having only girls experienced significantly higher transition rates than those having only boys or a mixed sibset. However, couples who married after about 1870 began to exhibit fertility behaviour consistent with the choice to have at least one surviving boy and girl. This result represents a surprisingly early move towards the symmetrical sex preference typical of modern European populations.

  • 6.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hemindustriarbeterskor i Göteborgs stad och Sjuhäradsbygden under det tidiga 1900-talets industrialisering: Avhandlingsrecension: Malin Nilsson, Taking work home: Labour dynamics of women industrial homeworkers in Sweden during the second industrial revolution, Gothenburg studies in economic history 14 (Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet 2015)2016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 81-87Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Reach out to bring in rejuvenation: on the need to populate historical demography2016In: The future of historical demography: upside down and inside out / [ed] Koen Matthijs, Saskia Hin, Jan Kok & Hideko Matsuo, Leuven: Acco, 2016, p. 249-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ett kortare liv än andra? Dödsrisker, funktionsnedsättningar och attityder i 1800-talets samhälle.2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 31-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study follows disabled individuals over their lifespan to examine their mortality risks in 19th century society, in comparison to non-disabled people. The aim is to detect whether people, due to their disability, had a higher probability of meeting a premature death. We use Sweden’s 19th-century parish registers to identify people the ministers defined as disabled, and employ theories on deviance and gender to grasp the statistical mortality findings. Disability significantly jeopardized the survival of individuals and particularly of men, probably because impairment limited their chances to match the breadwinner ideals associated with the male gender.

  • 9.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Sequence analysis of how disability influenced life trajectories in a past population from the nineteenth-century Sundsvall region, Sweden2017In: Historical Life Course Studies, ISSN 1570-1522, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 4, p. 97-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    First a job, and then a family?: Impacts of disabilities on young people's life courses in a nineteenth-century Swedish region2017In: Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ), ISSN 1041-5718, E-ISSN 2159-8371, Vol. 37, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study considers the life courses of young men and women with and without disabilities in the Sundsvall region of Sweden during the nineteenth century. It aims to ascertain how disability and gender shaped their involvement in work and their experience of family in order to assess the extent of their social inclusion. Through the use of Swedish parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, we examine 8,874 individuals observed from 15 to 33 years of age to investigate whether obtaining a job, getting married and having children were less frequent events for people with disabilities. Our results reveal that this was the case and particularly for those with mental disabilities, even if having an impairment did not wholly prevent people from finding a job. However, their work did not represent the key to family formation and for the women it implied a higher rate of illegitimacy. We argue that the lower level of inclusion in work and family was not solely the outcome of the impairment itself, but differed in relation to the particular attitudes towards men and women with disabilities within the labour market and society more generally in this particular context.

1 - 10 of 10
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