umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Comparison of Mass Customization Toolkits for Consumer Products Produced by Rapid Manufacturing2011In: Bridging Mass Customization & Open Innovation: Proceedings of the MCPC 2011 Conference / [ed] Henry Chesbrough & Frank Piller, Raleigh, NC: Lulu Inc. , 2011, 9- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several mass customization toolkits for consumer products are compared amongst each other from a design perspective. The customized products are all produced with rapid manufacturing technologies and in all cases the shape of the product is the main variable attribute which can be customized. The aim is to determine criteria that define the generic process of this co-creation approach. Comparison is used as a method since it focuses on understanding the customization tools and the process. The first part of the paper is concerned with the theoretical approach and the comparison of five toolkits. The second part deals more in-depth with the design of solution spaces which focus primarily on customization beyond aesthetics and it also deals with the design of validation tools. The expected outcome is a generic process of co-creation which highlights valuable aspects and can be used for the future development of mass customization toolkits.

  • 2.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Model for Evaluating Mass Customization Toolkits2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization involves the consumer in the design process by enabling them to customize a design through the use of a toolkit. In this paper, a model is introduced that can be used to evaluate mass customization toolkits. The model is based on target outcome and guidance and analyzes the toolkits by looking at product attributes, mechanisms, freedom in the solution space and guidance in terms of the starting point and provided instructions. The three main findings presented in this paper concern the emphasis of current toolkits on customizing hard product attributes, a focus on ‘lower-level’ product attributes, and the uniqueness of the outcomes that current toolkits produce. 

  • 3.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Model for Evaluating the Solution Space of Mass Customization Toolkits2012In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 3, no 4, 205-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization involves consumers in the design process by enabling them to customize a product through the use of a toolkit. The aim of this paper is to develop a profound understanding of constructing a solution space of mass customization toolkits and to examine the autonomy of the user in relation to the solution space. In this study a model is proposed that can be used to evaluate the solution space of mass customization toolkits. The model is based on target outcome and guidance and analyses toolkits by examining product attributes, mechanisms and choice in the solution space and guidance throughout the process of customization. The three main findings presented concern the emphasis of existing toolkits on customizing ‘hard’ product attributes, a strong focus on ‘lower-level’ product attributes, and the lack of uniqueness in the outcomes from current toolkits.

  • 4.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Identifying User-as-Designer Behaviors When Designing By Using Toolkits2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer products are becoming more and more open for consumers to design, make or adapt them to their own preferences and needs. An emerging area of product toolkits turns users into designers. In this paper we use the term user-as-designer, shortly user-designer, which refers to a consumer who uses a toolkit to design a product for himself. Designing by using toolkits challenges the role of the professional designer in ways that yet have to be fully explored and understood as well as the role of the passive consumer that gains new freedom and responsibility.

    The aim of this paper is to explore consumers designing an everyday product focusing on the behavior users have in relation to the tool they use. The participants expressed their preferences directly into the creation of an object through the use of a digital toolkit. A group of ten students participated, their designs were produced by 3D printing and they reflected upon their process and design. Three core findings are presented that concern the behavior of users when designing through a toolkit. First, we identified four user-designer characters that describe the exploration of the solution space. Secondly, we revealed the behavior of participants through visualizing the process of customization. The third finding concerns the predictability of outcomes for the designer of the toolkit. The discussion focuses on two levels; first we describe the aspects from this study that are relevant for future toolkit development. Issues like the exploration of the solution space, specific behavior in constrained toolkits, predictability, iteration and the amount of freedom for the user. The second level of the discussion focuses on the implications for consumer involvement in the design process. This study has shown that when consumers are engaged in the design process they need to understand what it means to create rather than being tricked in some part of a process in an isolated manner. 

  • 5.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Investigating Lay Design through Prototyping a Toolkit for Audio Equipment2015In: RTD2015 21st Century Makers and Materialities: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, Cambridge, UK, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-industrial design challenges the current way of design and production of consumer products. Leveraging from 3D printing and the potential of layperson involvement in the design process, we investigated how the relation between the professional designer and layperson might change in a democratized design process, where the layperson is an active participant, mediated by toolkit software.

    In this research through design study we examined this relation by prototyping a toolkit for audio equipment based upon three personas and scenarios that we developed. Consequently three audio products have been made and fabricated using 3D printing.

    In the second part of this study we staged a series of discussions with design practitioners around the material that we developed. In these interviews they discussed the role of the layperson and the professional designer, accountability of both, the ways in which this toolkit creates accessibility and adaptability and the aesthetics of the product prototypes. The outcome of this study is, besides the objects and the web- based toolkit and a detailed description and discussion of the changing role of the designer and layperson, an insight that revealed the value of a research through design approach. Namely, in this study the material helped the design practitioners to become self-reflective.

  • 6.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Investigating the unexplored possibilities of digital-physical toolkits in lay design2014In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 8, no 2, 15-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital–physical toolkits enable the layperson to design everyday consumer products. The aim of this paper is to identify and gain understanding of the unexplored possibilities of digital–physical toolkits. Looking at several different types of toolkits that enable novices to create, adapt or customize a design, we analyzed these toolkits and identified several characteristics and mechanisms that they share. We also investigated how people use toolkits through two usage experiments. In the first experiment, we identified several issues that arise when consumers use toolkits. In the second experiment, we developed a vocabulary for the exploration of the design space and we identified specific behaviors that laypersons enact when designing. The results of this paper are introduced through our lay design model, which deals with different types of layperson autonomy as well as with the unexplored possibilities of learning paths and iteration within digital–physical toolkits. If lay design becomes commonplace there will be an increasing need for understanding this practice. The unexplored possibilities discussed in this paper present opportunities for designers, and taking advantage of them will have far-reaching consequences for the whole product development cycle, from the way products are designed and developed to how they are distributed and sold.

  • 7.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Opening Up Design: Engaging the Layperson in the Design of Everyday Products2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation in industrial design focuses on the gap between the context of design and the context of use. It aims to open up design to the layperson and investigate an active role for the layperson in the design of everyday products. Over the last century, the industrial paradigm has institutionalised and professionalised many practices, including product design. A binary spectrum of production and consumption has been established with distinct roles for the professional designer, who engages in production, and the consumer, who engages in consumption. However, this clear distinction has been blurred recently and the consumer, or layperson, is no longer involved only in consumption, but also in production. In this research I have explored and examined the participation of the layperson, or the non-professional, in design, which I refer to as lay design. It constitutes a shift for the professional designer from knowing what a future user would like to have towards knowing what a layperson would like to design, which is for most designers an unfamiliar way of thinking. I specifically investigated how the layperson can be involved in design through the use of so-called digital-physical toolkits, software applications where one designs in a digital environment and which outputs a physical product.

    Lay design is enabled by two developments: On the one hand, the creation of variable designs is enabled by computational design, and on the other hand, the fabrication of variable products is enabled by 3D printing. The two main questions that I focused on are: How will the roles of the professional designer and the layperson change when the latter engages in the design of personal products and how can designers develop digital-physical toolkits for the layperson to collaboratively create value and meaning?

    The theory that I drew on consists of existing approaches which involve the layperson in design, such as mass customisation, meta-design, and co-design, and I used the theory of technological mediation to analyse and discuss the mediating role of toolkits in lay design. I investigated the research questions through a series of studies, both analytical and experimental. For the experiments I took a constructive design research approach, which means that I engaged in the making of toolkit and product prototypes in order to obtain insights and an understanding of the subject.

    The main contribution of this research is a framework of lay design that consists of a set of principles and guidelines that enables the professional designer to develop digital-physical toolkits that empower the layperson to engage in the design of everyday products. Through the participation of the layperson in the design process, lay design constitutes value created by both the professional and lay designer, thereby eliminating the separation of production and consumption. The framework’s principles outline the basic ideas of lay design while the guidelines support the professional designer in the development of toolkits and their products in practice. Lay design is concerned with the layperson designing personal products and is therefore primarily self-serving. It deals with creating meaningful products by enabling the layperson to personify designs, meaning that the designed product cannot exist without its originator. This research established an understanding of design spaces and toolkits and of the roles the professional designer, layperson, and toolkits play.

    The implications of lay design concern the role of the professional designer, the way value is created, a shared accountability, and also the way designers are educated regarding the tool-sets, skill-sets, mindset, and knowledge.

  • 8.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wordpress of objects: addressing layman participation in a post- industrial society2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 ACM conference on Pervasive and ubiquitous computing adjunct publication, ACM Press, 2013, 945-950 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a perspective on layman participation in the design of everyday products is presented. The development of digital fabrication technologies such as 3D printing enables an increasing involvement of the layman in appropriating the performance of objects to their own needs and desires. The question is how professional designers as well as laymen deal with openness in product design. An analogy is made with the content management system Wordpress to discuss how could be dealt with openness in a toolkit that addresses multiple skill levels of its users.

  • 9.
    Hermans, Guido
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University.
    Exploring Parametric Design: Consumer Customization of an Everyday Object2012In: Proceedings of DRS2012 / [ed] Praima Israsena, Juthamas Tangsantikul, David Durling, Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University , 2012, 707-717 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toolkits for mass customization can be seen as a link between a consumer and a solution space and enable the user to customize a design to their own needs and desires. The development and increasing availability of additive manufacturing which enables customization and the growing amount of businesses developing mass customization services will direct industrial designers to rethink their role and their tasks in the design process. Customization through digital fabrication technologies is an emerging field where industrial designers have to be aware of and able to design for. There is an ongoing shift from standardization and mass production towards individualization, markets of one and customization. The aim of this exploratory study is to get a better understanding of toolkits for mass customization in order to develop a method for designing customizable products. The experiment conducted in this study invited participants to customize, use and evaluate a kitchen product. We present five core findings from this experiment. This study has identified several issues that play a role when consumers take on the task of customizing a consumer product. The study has also shown potential future areas when it comes to parametric design.

  • 10.
    Hermans, Guido
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Valtonen, Anna
    School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University.
    Investigating the changing relation between consumer and designer in post-industrial design2014In: Proceedings of DRS2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå: Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University , 2014, 940-950 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the post-industrial society and the changing object of design. Postindustrial design will be realized through the digitalization of the physical world and the advent of digital fabrication tools such as 3D printing that bridge the gap between digital design and physical goods. In post-industrial design professional designers will be concerned with designing toolkits and incomplete designs rather than fully determined products. The consumer will be adapting the incomplete design to his or her needs and desires in some way or another. This adaptation could be done with minimal involvement as well as by intensive participation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the changing relation between consumer and designer in a post-industrial society by examining the object of design. We exemplify the new object of design by examining several consumer products that possess some property of post-industrial design. Based on our research we propose four ways, or tactics, for designers to deal with heterogeneous consumer needs and preferences, two of which are unique to post-industrial design. We end this paper by briefly discussing the implications to design practice and design education.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf