umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bengmark, Samuel
    et al.
    Thunberg, Hans
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Success-factors in Transition to University Mathematics2017In: International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, ISSN 0020-739X, E-ISSN 1464-5211, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 988-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines different factors' relative importance for students' performance in the transition to university mathematics. Students' characteristics (motivation, actions and beliefs) were measured when entering the university and at the end of the first year. Principal component analysis revealed four important constructs: Self-efficacy, Motivation type, Study habits and Views of mathematics. Subsequently, orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS) analysis was used for measuring the constructs' ability to predict students' university mathematics grades. No individual constructs measured at the time of entrance predicted more than 5% of the variation. On the other hand, jointly they predicted 14%, which is almost in pair with upper secondary grades predicting 17%. Constructs measured at the end of the first year were stronger predictors, jointly predicting 37% of the variation in university grades, with Self-efficacy (21%) and Motivation (12%) being the two strongest individual predictors. In general, Study habits were not important for predicting university achievement. However, for students with low upper secondary grades, the textbook and interaction with peers, rather than internet-based resources, contributed positively to achievement. The association between Views of mathematics and performance was weak for all groups and non-existing for students with low grades.

  • 2.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany and their interrelations with classroom characteristics2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. Published online: 29 Aug 2019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of epistemic belief research, more studies on how these beliefs are formed in different cultural contexts are called for. Moreover, there are strong assumptions that teachers’ instructional practices are paramount to the development of students’ epistemic beliefs. The current study aims at investigating differences between Sweden and Germany in both, and in their relationships. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,731 students in Grades 5 through 11. To sum up, latent multi group comparison revealed several differences in the level of students’ beliefs and classroom characteristics. Moreover, latent regression analyses showed that the observed classroom characteristics were significant predictors of students’ beliefs concerning the justification and development of knowledge, and that the prediction pattern differ between countries.

  • 3.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany: Correlations with classroom characteristics2017In: Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics: Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good. Book of Abstracts, 2017, p. 678-678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims at describing students’ epistemic beliefs over school years 5–11, investigating differences between Sweden and Germany regarding the ‘trajectories’ of epistemic beliefs over the grades, and if classroom factors can explain these differences. A cross-sectional survey, covering grades 5–11, was distributed to 1501 students in Sweden and 2839 in Germany to assess their epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment in chemistry. Factor analysis revealed four valid constructs for students’ epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment, respectively.  A common trend for both countries was an increasing sophistication over grades as to the Certainty of knowledge and an emphasis in all grades on the need for evidence from several sources to make claims of knowing (Justification). Trust in authorities decreased over the grades in Germany, while Swedish students showed similar levels in all grades. Beliefs in dynamic and changing knowledge was strong in both countries, with an increasing trend in Germany while stable in Sweden. Significant correlations between epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment were found in both countries, but stronger in Sweden than Germany

  • 4.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Learning physics in a simulation environment2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Model of competencies for modeling and numerical problem solving in university physics education2008In: GIREP 2008 Conference, Physics Curriculum Design, Development and Validation, August 18-22, Nicosia, Cyprus, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Role of beliefs and emotions in numerical problem solving in university physics education2012In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 010108-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical problem solving in classical mechanics in university physics education offers a learning situation where students have many possibilities of control and creativity. In this study, expertlike beliefs about physics and learning physics together with prior knowledge were the most important predictors of the quality of performance of a task with many degrees of freedom. Feelings corresponding to control and concentration, i.e., emotions that are expected to trigger students’ intrinsic motivation, were also important in predicting performance. Unexpectedly, intrinsic motivation, as indicated by enjoyment and interest, together with students’ personal interest and utility value beliefs did not predict performance. This indicates that although a certain degree of enjoyment is probably necessary, motivated behavior is rather regulated by integration and identification of expertlike beliefs about learning and are more strongly associated with concentration and control during learning and, ultimately, with high performance. The results suggest that the development of students’ epistemological beliefs is important for students’ ability to learn from realistic problem-solving situations with many degrees of freedom in physics education.

  • 7.
    Borg, Farhana
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Vinterek, Monika
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Assessing self-reported understanding and practices of sustainability issues among children in eco- and non-eco-certified preschools in Sweden2016In: Environmental and Sustainability Education Research (ESER) Symposium. Dublin, Ireland, August 22-26, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Borg, Farhana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Vinterek, Monika
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Children's learning for a sustainable society: influences from home and preschool2017In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 151-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although parents and preschool play important roles in developing children?s behavior and attitudes, little is known about their influences on children?s learning of environmental, social and economic aspects of sustainability. This study investigated the influences of home- and preschool-related practices and factors on children?s declarative and functional knowledge of sustainability issues, and the extent to which eco-certified preschools promote beneficial practices. ?Eco-certified preschools? refers to schools that explicitly work with education for sustainability. Children (n=53), aged five to six years, and the directors (n=7) at six eco-certified and six non-eco-certified preschools were interviewed, while guardians (n=89) and teachers (n=74) filled out questionnaires. Children?s responses were categorized and classified using SOLO Taxonomy. Multivariate analyses were performed in SIMCA P + 14. The findings indicate a positive relationship between children?s declarative and functional knowledge of sustainability issues and the involvement of teachers and guardians in sustainability-related discussions and activities. Teachers? verbal interaction with children about sustainability issues, and the perceived high value of these issues among teachers and directors seem to be more beneficial for children?s declarative knowledge than their functional knowledge. No statistically significant differences between eco- and non-eco-certified preschools in terms of children?s declarative and functional knowledge were found.

  • 9.
    Borg, Farhana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Vinterek, Monika
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Preschool children's knowledge about the environmental impact of various modes of transport2019In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 189, no 3, p. 376-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored Swedish preschool children’s knowledge about theenvironmental impact of various transport modes, and investigatedwhether or not eco-certification has any role to play in relation to thisknowledge. Additionally, this study examined children’s perceivedsources of knowledge. Using illustrations and semi-structured questions,53 children, aged five to six years, from six eco-certified and six non-eco-certified preschools were interviewed. Qualitative and quantitative datawere analysed using content analysis and Orthogonal Partial LeastSquares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), respectively. Findings revealedthat most of the children had acquired some knowledge about theenvironmental impact of various transport modes, although somechildren were not familiar with the word‘environment’. Although thecomplexity of children’s justifications for the environmental impact ofdifferent modes of transport tended to be higher at eco-certifiedpreschools compared to non-eco-certified preschools, no statisticallysignificant differences were found. Parents were reported to be a majorsource of knowledge.

  • 10.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Relationships between achievement goals and epistemic beliefs: developmental trends over Grades 5–112017In: Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics: Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good. Book of abstracts, 2017, p. 385-385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study are to describe how students’ epistemic beliefs and achievement goals develop over grades 5–11, to describe the correlations between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals, and how these correlations develop over grades 5–11. Furthermore, we will explore the data for indications of causal relationships between students’ goals and epistemic beliefs, and the directionality of these relationships. The analyses builds on data from a cross-sectional survey distributed to all students in grades 5–11 in two municipalities in Sweden in 2014. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of students’ responses revealed four valid constructs concerning students’ epistemic beliefs: Development, Justification, Certainty, and Source. Regarding students’ achievement goals, two constructs were identified: Mastery approach goals and Performance goals (including both approach and avoidance goals). Students’ factor scores on the constructs were used for calculating zero order Spearman correlations between constructs. Overall, students’ epistemic beliefs were stable over the grades, while performance goals increased at the transition between primary and secondary school. Mastery goals showed a mainly decreasing trend over the grades. Development and Justification of knowledge showed positive significant correlations with Mastery goals over grades 5–11, while naïve beliefs about Certainty and Source of knowledge were moderately and positively correlated with Performance goals in grades 5–7, weakly correlated in grade 8–9, and insignificant in grades 10 and 11. For the conference, results will be complemented with longitudinal data, focusing on causal relations between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals.

  • 11.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Achievement goal factor structure among chemistry students in Grade 5 – 11: A comparison between Sweden and Germany2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the factor structure of German and Swedish students’ achievement goals in chemistry were investigated. The national culture of Germany and Sweden are very different in the masculinity versus femininity dimension, expressing the level of competitiveness and the way performance is evaluated in the society. Therefore, the structure of students’ achievement goals, in part based on their evaluation of performance, may very well differ between the countries. The results showed that a three-factor CFA model, separating mastery-approach, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals, fitted the German data best. In Sweden, the three-factor model and a two-factor model combining the two performance goals fitted the data equally well. However, the correlation between the performance approach and avoidance goals in the Swedish three-factor model was not significantly different from 1 and the separation thus lacked practical significance. Further, the same pattern was repeated for grade 5 – 11 individually within each country. Measurement invariance between grades within the countries support an invariant factor structure, and thus age-independent factor structures. We argue that differences in factor structures between the two countries are related to the differences in national culture.

  • 12.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goal Models: a Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achievement goal theory is one of the most widespread motivation models within education research. Strong empirical support exists for the trichotomous model, comprising mastery-approach, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. However, research also indicate problems with model transferability between contexts. In this study, based on questionnaire data from 4201 students, we use confirmatory factor analysis to compare the factor structures of students’ achievement goals in two culturally distinct countries. Factor structures for Grades 5–11 within the two countries were also compared. Results show that the separation between performance-approach and performance-avoidance goals differs between the two countries, and that this difference is consistent over the grades. Hence, results indicate that the model is not freely transferable between countries. The results are discussed in relation to differences in national culture and other proposed explanations such as age, perceived competence, and questionnaire characteristics.

  • 13.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. UmSER.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. UmSER.
    Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goals: A Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of achievement goals among students in Sweden and Germany, two countries differing substantially in competitiveness according to Hofstede’s dimensions of national culture. As the competitiveness dimension resembles performance goal classroom structures, shown to affect students’ achievement goals, we propose that the structure of students’ achievement goals may differ between the countries. Through confirmatory factor analyses, we found that a three-factor model, separating mastery-approach, performance-approach,and performance-avoidance goals, fitted the German students’ data best. In Sweden, the three-factor model and a two factormodel combining the two performance goals fitted the data equally well. However, the correlation between the performance approach and avoidance goals in the Swedish three-factor model was not significantly different from 1 and we thus considered the separation to lack practical significance. We discuss national culture, and other variables, as explanations for the differences in achievement goal factor structures.

  • 14.
    Höft, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry Education, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel, Germany.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Department of Chemistry Education, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel, Germany.
    Blankenburg, Janet S.
    Department of Chemistry Education, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel, Germany.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Knowing more about things you care less about: cross-sectional analysis of the opposing trend and interplay between conceptual understanding and interest in secondary school chemistry2019In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 184-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of students' interest in school science activities, their understanding of central chemical concepts, and the interplay between both constructs across Grades 5–11 were analyzed in a cross‐sectional paper‐and‐pencil study (N = 2,510, mean age 11–17 years). Previous empirical findings indicate that students' knowledge increases over the time of secondary school while students' interest, especially in natural science subjects, tends to decrease. Concomitantly, there is evidence for an increase in the positive coupling between interest and knowledge across time. However, previous studies mainly rely on rather global measures, for example, school grades or general subject‐related interest, and focus on science as an integrated subject instead of specific disciplines, for example, chemistry. For this article, more proximal and differentiated measures for students' understanding of three chemical concepts (Chemical Reaction, Energy, Matter) and interest in seven dimensions of school science activities according to the RIASEC + N model (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional, and Networking; cf. Dierks, Höffler, & Parchmann, 2014) were applied. The results are in line with previous research indicating a general increase in conceptual understanding and a decline in students' interest for all school science activities. However, the interplay between conceptual understanding and interest differs across the seven dimensions. Interest in activities which are likely to promote cognitive activation (investigative, networking) or involving the communication of knowledge (social, enterprising, and networking) are increasingly connected to conceptual understanding, especially in upper secondary grades. Interest in guided hands‐on activities (realistic) which are typical in secondary science teaching, however, shows only small positive correlations to students' conceptual understanding across all grades. Hence, in upper‐secondary school, investigative, social, enterprising, and networking activities seem to provide opportunities to benefit most from the interrelation between students' interests and their understanding.

  • 15.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Culturally equipped for socio-scientific issues?: a comparative study on how teachers and students in mono- and multiethnic schools handle work with complex issues2011In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 33, no 13, p. 1835-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) are not only said to increase students' interest in science, but they also strengthen the generic skills of teamwork, problem-solving, and media literacy. At the same time, these skills are prerequisites for successful work with SSI. The aim of the study is to analyze what happens when SSI are implemented in science classrooms with various degrees of ethnic diversity and socio-cultural status. We are also interested in knowing how teachers structure the SSI work from discourses on what suits different students. Quantitative and qualitative methods are combined, for example, questionnaires and ethnographic fieldwork, presented through partial least squares analysis and thick descriptions. We can notice discursive differences between 'Us' and 'The Other' and between mono- and multiethnic schools. In an earlier research, images of differences between the different student groups emerged, and we can find these in the results from the questionnaires. In an observation study, another pattern appeared that indicated similarities rather than differences between mono- and multiethnic classrooms. The students are first of all inside the discourse of 'the successful student.' Noteworthy is that the teachers' roles correspond better with the discourse than with how students actually act. The study also shows that SSI articulate a collision between different discourses on education: a discourse on differences between students in multi- and monoethnic classrooms; a discourse on how to become a successful student; and a discourse on the school's mission to educate participating citizens. It is suggested that schools should relate to, expose, and articulate discursive clashes that emerge when introducing new work forms.

  • 16.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Culturally equipped for SSI? How do teachers and students in mono- and multi-cultural schools handle work with complex issues?2009In: ESERA: European Science Education Research Association, 2009 Conference, 31 August - 4 September, 2009, Istanbul: Bros , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindahl, Britt
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Rehn, Agneta
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Att utgå från samhällsfrågor i grundskolans naturorienterade undervisning: ett sätt att öka elevers intresse och kunnande?2011In: Resultatdialog 2011, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2011, p. 93-98Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Lindahl, Britt
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Nyström, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Rehn, Agneta
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Socio-scientific issues: a way to improve students’ interest and learning?2009In: ESERA : European Science Education Research Association: 2009 conference: 31 August - 4 September 2009Ankara : Gazi University, 2009, p. 427-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to many documents there is a strong need to renew science education. One way could be to work with socio scientific issues (SSI). This paper reports about both students and teachers' experiences and learning when working with socioscientific issues in science education at senior level (age 13-16). The approach is multidimensional as factors that influence cognition as well as motivation and the forming of attitudes are complex. Results suggest SSI work forms are more important than personal factors for explaining outcomes. Relevant issues, autonomy and functioning group work seem to be important aspects of successful SSI work together with structure provided by the teacher, and information that challenges previous knowledge. In general, SSI seems to be most efficient for students, who believe they learn from presenting and discussing their knowledge, focus on ‘the large picture’, acknowledges own responsibility for learning, finds school science personally relevant and are self-efficacious. It seems that the outcomes from SSI work are much in the hands of the teacher. Thus, working with SSI could be considered as an appropriate activity for all students. However, educators should continue to look for ways to promote development of students’ attitudes and epistemological beliefs.

  • 19.
    Lindahl, Britt
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Rehn, Agneta
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Nyström, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Socio-scientific issues – a way to improve students’ interest and learning?: Paper presented at 2010 NARST Annual International Conference in Philadelphia2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lindahl, Britt
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola.
    Rehn, Agneta
    Malmö högskola.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå University, Umeå School of Education (USE). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Socio-scientific Issues: A Way to Improve Students’ Interest and Learning?2011In: US-China Education Review B, ISSN 2161-6248, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 342-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to many documents, there is a strong need to renew science education. One way could be to work with SSI (socio-scientific issues). This paper reports on both students' and teachers' experiences and learning when working with socio-scientific issues in science education in secondary school (aged from 13 to 16). The approach is multidimensional, as factors that influence cognition as well as motivation and the forming of attitudes are complex. Results suggest that SSI work forms are more important than personal factors for explaining outcomes. Relevant issues, autonomy and functioning group work seem to be important aspects of successful SSI work together with structure provided by the teacher, and information that challenges previous knowledge. In general, SSI seems to be most efficient for students, who believe that they learn from presenting and discussing their knowledge, focus on "the large picture", acknowledge own responsibility for learning, find school science personally relevant and are self-efficacious. It seems that the outcomes from SSI work are much in the hands of the teacher. This paper is a short summary of the first year and quantitative part of the project. Further results from the project will later be found in our homepage (http://www.sisc.se). 

  • 21.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The role of scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn, think and reason in any given context (Schommer-Aikins, 2004). However, in the science learning context, the relationship between the level of epistemic sophistication, learning, and learning outcomes is sometimes ambiguous (Elby & Hammer, 2001). Taking this result as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their approaches to a computer simulated task, and the quality of their solutions. 19 tenth grade students, with different SEB, were selected to participate in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. Constructionist learning environments emphasize the scope for students’ to take control of their own learning, draw their own conclusions, and use their own knowledge in order to construct objects (Harel & Papert, 1991). Students’ manipulations of the simulation and any spoken comments were video-recorded and subsequently coded by an inductive approach. Relationships between students’ SEB and problem solving quality were explored by hierarchical orthogonal partial least squares analysis. The results revealed that different sets of SEB were conducive to different aspects of students’ problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, our results suggest that there might not be a universal relationship between the degree of theoretical sophistication of students’ SEB and quality of learning outcomes. The relationship can only be understood in terms of the actions they induce, and the results of these actions. It is therefore of great importance to further explore the productiveness of SEB in different types of learning situations.

  • 22.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 124-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on how epistemic beliefs influence students' learning in different contexts is ambiguous. Given this, we have examined the relationships between students' scientific epistemic beliefs, their problem solving, and solutions in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. The problem solving process and performance of 19 tenth grade students, with different scientific epistemic beliefs, was video recorded and inductively coded. Quantitative analysis revealed that different sets of epistemic beliefs were conducive to different aspects of students' problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, authority dependence was associated with high degree of adherence to instructions. Hence, there might not be a universal relationship between theoretical sophistication of students' epistemic beliefs and quality of learning outcomes. We suggest that the conduciveness to desired outcomes is a better measure of sophistication than theoretical non-contextualized a priori assumptions.

  • 23.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Sullivan, Kirk P H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Philosophy and Linguistics. Lingvistik.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    On the lookout for new relationships: an exploration of keystroke-logged writing data2006In: SIG Writing, Antwerp, Belgium, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Palm, Torulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Sullivan Hellgren, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Elevers motivation i matematik2010Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Stadler, Erika
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik..
    Bengmark, Samuel
    Chalmers University of Technology/University of Gothenburg.
    Thunberg, Hans
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology..
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Approaches to learning mathematics - differences between beginning and experienced university students2013In: Proceedings of the Eight Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. / [ed] Behiye Ubuz, Cigdem Haser, Maria Alessandra Mariotti, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2013, p. 2436-2445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report on an on-going quantitative study of students’ transition from school to university mathematics. The study aims at examining differences between beginners and experienced students’ approaches to learning mathematics. Students were given questionnaires in the beginning and at the end of their first year at university. The results were summarized with descriptive and interferential statistics. The results show that beginners rely heavily on the teacher, while experienced students re-orient themselves from the teacher to other kinds of mathematical resources, for example peers and Internet based resources

  • 26. Stadler, Erika
    et al.
    Bengmark, Samuel
    Thunberg, Hans
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Novice mathematics students at the university: experiences, orientations and expectations2012In: Skrifter från Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning, ISSN 1651-3274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report on an on-going study of novice university students in mathematics and the secondary-tertiary transition. A total of 146 novice mathematics students from three Swedish universities were given a questionnaire in the beginning of the semester. The aim was to characterize them as learners of mathematics. The results were summarized with descriptive statistics and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to look for correlations. The results show that the teacher and the textbook play a crucial role in their learning of mathematics. Further more, the students can be characterized as either individual or interactive learners, which relates to students’ grades.

  • 27.
    Vinterek, Monika
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Tegmark, Mats
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Alatalo, Tarja
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Liberg, Caroline
    Uppsala universitet.
    Amount of Text Read at School and the Motivation for Reading: A Large Scale Study in Grade 6 and 92018In: European Conference on Educational Research, Bolzano, Italy, September 4-7, 2018: Abstracts, Berlin, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on some preliminary results from the project “To read or not to read: A study of reading practices in compulsory school” funded by the Swedish Research Council. The aim of the project is to develop knowledge of existing reading practices and to find out what kind of teaching that promotes such practices in a way that enables students to learn from reading. The decline in students’ reading literacy is something that concerns and worries many European and other Western countries. But surprisingly it is difficult to find large scale studies focusing on how much students read at school. To be a good reader one needs to practice (Kuhn & Stahl, 2003; Campell et al., 2001); it takes more than 5000 hours of reading to achieve a well-functioning reading capacity (Lundberg & Herrlin, 2005). To learn from text one needs to be able to read a longer text (Topping et al., 2007; Merisuo-Storm & Soininen, 2014). Prior research in the field further shows that it is important for students to read different types of texts (Kuhn & Stahl, 2003) and thus develop vocabulary and reading skills in many subjects (see, for example, Biemiller, 2001).The amount of reading, at school or at leisure, correlates positively with reading ability (Anderson et al., 1988; Cunningham & Stanovich, 1997; Taylor et al., 990). In our study we therefore are interested in the total amount of coherent and continuous text students read during an average school day in all their subjects, with a particular focus on reading habits in Swedish (L1), English (L2), Chemistry, and History. We also want to find out how the amount of reading correlates with the students’ self-assessed motivation for their school-initiated reading activities. In the first part of the project there is a predominantly quantitative focus in which we seek to find out the extent to which students read continuous prose texts – fictional as well as non-fictional – as part of their everyday school work, and how their reading is related to different types of motivation. The second part of the project has a predominantly qualitative focus where a limited number of groups will be selected for a series of closer classroom studies of teachers as well as students through observations, interviews and questionnaires in order to find out what characterizes the reading practices of these schools and classes. This paper will report on some preliminary results from the first part of the project where the following research questions are to be answered:

    • To what extent do students in years 6 and 9 read continuous prose text—fiction as well as nonfiction— as part of their school work?
    • What kind of motivation do students express for reading nonfiction and fiction texts in different school subjects?
    • What is the nature of the relationship between students’ reading motivation and the extent of their reading in school?
    • What differences in the interest of reading and in the reading habits among females and males, between school years 6 and 9, and between schools can be detected?
  • 28.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Attitudes toward Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: state, psychological origin, and strategies for transformation2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Learning by computer-simulated laboratory exercises – effects on learning outcomes.2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Motivation for Learning Science and Mathematics: Identifying Personal and Environmental Factors2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several theories in motivation research aim at explaining or predicting the emotional experiences and behavior of students in academic situations as well as the quality of learning outcomes. However, there are still ambiguities regarding the mechanisms of motivation, how motivation can be influenced, and what effects motivation has on learning. As a first step to examine the role of situational and personal variables involved in some of the most influential motivation theories, their relative ability to predict student behavior, emotional experiences and learning outcomes were investigated by PLS analysis of questionnaire data from 658 upper secondary school students. As to outcomes, results show that experiences of anxiety, on one hand, are orthogonal to perceived degree of learning, enjoyment, and motivated behavior, on the other. Major predictors of anxiety emotions were; Attributions, pertaining to the perceived degree of control over outcomes; the nature of relations to peers; and whether the students perceived that the goal of the lesson was understanding or ‘production’. The degree of learning, motivated behavior, and enjoyment were, in descending order, predicted by students’ achievement goals and motivation type, the teacher’s engagement,  character of feedback, autonomy support and the level of teacher demands on students. To some extent, students’ epistemological beliefs regarding the complexity of knowledge also predicted these types of outcomes.

  • 31.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Motverkar skolans strukturer insatser som görs för att öka elevernas motivation?: Interaktioner mellan den lärande och lärandesituationen: Effekter på afektiva upplevelser och lärandeutfall2013In: Resultatdialog 2013, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2013, p. 178-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Simulation in university chemistry education: cognitive and affective aspects2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis undertakes two main tasks; to explore, within the authentic educational context, variables that influence the quality and outcomes of the knowledge-constructing activity during the simulation exercise; and to find appropriate instruments and methods to measure these variables, processes and outcomes.

    Closed-ended tasks that provided a high degree of structure, i.e., supported students’ regulation of learning during the simulation exercise, were more beneficial for perceived improvement of declarative knowledge and students’ motivation than open-ended tasks. Open-ended tasks did however lead to substantial shifts in students’ cognitive focus in subsequent laboratory exercises and improvement of students’ level of chemistry reasoning in interviews.

    Student attitudes toward learning proved important in the first paper where significantly higher ability to apply chemistry knowledge in interviews could be found for students with relativistic attitudes compared to those with more dualistic perspectives on learning. In the subsequent papers, the effects of attitudes were not as clear, possibly due to too small differences in the learning situations that were compared.

    Quality of the learning discourse during simulation was measured with three qualitatively different methods, focusing on partly different aspects. The different methods gave very similar results regarding the relative quality of the discourses. Thus, “quality” as such seems to be an underlying feature that permeates many aspects of the discourse and consequently could be targeted in different ways, e.g., focusing on quantitative as well as qualitative aspects. The analyses revealed several components of quality; co-operative activity, correctness and complexity of chemistry reasoning, discussion length and intensity, ability to realize cognitive conflict, and reference to theory while reasoning.

    Doing the simulation exercise in a distributed learning setting (written e-communication), supported discussions with higher accuracy and complexity of chemistry reasoning and frequent references to theory while the face-to-face situation allowed for longer and more intense discussions and a higher degree of co-operative activity. Not very surprisingly, high-quality discussions were characterized by high scores in all these components. There were indications that relatively good pre-knowledge might be required to benefit fully from face-to-face discussions.

    The validity of instruments and methods, used to measure flow experiences, attitudes (i.e., epistemological beliefs), knowledge accessibility (intuitive knowledge) and discourse quality are discussed thoroughly. Special interest has been devoted to whether qualitative data should be quantified or not, providing arguments in favor of quantitative methods for analyzing and reporting qualitative data.

  • 33.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Using PCA for analysis of questionnaires, a journey into the affective domain.2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Berg, A
    Lunberg, B
    Computer simulated acid-base titrations as prelab: effects on learning outcome2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Berg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Students' cognitive focus during a chemistry laboratory exercise: Effects of a computer simulated prelab2007In: Journal of research in science teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1098-2736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enhance the learning outcomes achieved by students, learners undertook a computer-simulated activity based on an acid-base titration prior to a university-level chemistry laboratory activity. Students were categorized with respect to their attitudes toward learning. During the laboratory exercise, questions that students asked their assistant teachers were used as indicators of cognitive focus. During the interviews, students' frequency and level of spontaneous use of chemical knowledge served as an indicator of knowledge usability. Results suggest that the simulation influenced students toward posing more theoretical questions during their laboratory work and, regardless of attitudes, exhibiting a more complex, correct use of chemistry knowledge in their interviews. A more relativistic student attitude toward learning was positively correlated with interview performance in both the control and treatment groups.

  • 36.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Hedman, Leif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Student attitudes toward learning, level of pre-knowledge and instruction type in a computer-simulation: effects on flow experiences and perceived learning outcomes2008In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 269-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attitudes toward learning (ATL) have been shown to influence students’ learning outcomes. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the ways in which the interaction between ATL, the learning situation, and the level of students’ prior knowledge influence affective reactions and conceptual change. In this study, a simulation of acid-base titrations was examined to assess the impact of instruction format, level of prior knowledge and students’ ATL on university-level students, with respect to flow experiences (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990) and perceived conceptual change. Results show that the use of guiding instructions was correlated with a perceived conceptual change and high levels of “Challenge,” “Enjoyment,” and “Concentration,” but low sense of control during the exercise. Students who used the open instructions scored highly on the “Control flow” component, but their perceived learning score was lower than that for the students who used the guiding instructions. In neither case did students’ ATL or their pre-test results contribute strongly to students’ flow experiences or their perceived learning in the two different learning situations.

  • 37.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Lindahl, Britt
    Högskolan Kristianstad Sektionen för Lärarutbildning.
    Science for Life: development of a multi-concept instrument to study the impact of socio-scientific issues on student interest in science2008In: Planning science instruction: From insight to learning to pedagogical practices, 2008, p. 97-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to many stakeholders there is a strong need to renew science education to bring about a radical change in young people’s interest in science. One way to increase students’ interest in science can be to bring in a humanistic perspective and to focus more on scientific literacy than science literacy. We have designed an evidence-based research project to understand more about what happens when students in lower secondary school are working with socio-scientific issues. Concepts within the affective domain are very complex and therefore many researchers have claimed that we have to construct multidimensional instruments and use multivariate analyses to interpret the results as science learning cannot be explained solely by examination of cognitive factors.

    The project is built up in three steps. In the first we have developed a teacher guide with six authentic cases and attitude questionnaires. In next step about 2000 pupils work with the cases and answer the questionnaires and in the last one we will perform a qualitative study in about 6 classes aiming at studying teachers and students’ development in more detail. In this paper we present the development of two questionnaire-based instruments that allow us to simultaneously consider the multivariate characteristics of student, the situation and the outcomes and how they relate to each other. A large number of items were collected from extant questionnaires and if necessary, adapted to Swedish conditions. In addition, new items were constructed, based on theory within the relevant fields of research. The aspects we want to assess besides different types of knowledge outcomes are for example attitudes, motivation, epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy and the impact of different working forms.

  • 38.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindahl, Britt
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Working with SSI: Factors influencing emotional and cognitive outcomes2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to many stakeholders, there is a strong need to renew science education to bring about a radical change in young people’s interest in science. A suggested way could be to focus more on scientific literacy than science literacy and to work with socio-scientific issues (SSI). This evidence-based research project investigates what happens with interest, knowledge and self-efficacy when students in lower secondary school work with such issues. Here we present results from the quantitative part of the study with a focus on the relations between personal and situational factors and their relative effects on learning experiences and outcomes. Two questionnaires were developed, one pre-SSI work to describe common work forms and pupils’ personal characteristics from several aspects and one post-SSI work to measure the situational characteristics of the SSI work and its cognitive/behavioural and affective outcomes. Results show that SSI work forms are more important than personal factors for explaining outcomes. Relevant issues, autonomy and functioning group work are important aspects. In general, SSI seems to be most efficient for pupils who believe they learn from presenting and discussing their knowledge, focus on ‘the large picture’, acknowledges own responsibility for learning, finds school science personally relevant and are self-efficacious.

  • 39.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Hellgren, Jenny M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Palm, Torulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Stimulating positive emotional experiences in mathematics learning: influence of situational and personal factors2014In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 673-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to assess the relative importance of a large number of variables for predicting students’ positive-activating emotions during mathematics learning. Participants were 668 first-year upper secondary school students from 33 schools of different sizes and locations. Two questionnaires were distributed, one assessing students’ perceptions and beliefs about their learning situation in mathematics in general, and the other assessing the characteristics of a particular mathematics lesson and the students’ emotional experiences during this lesson. Single-construct and multivariate models for predicting students’ emotions were computed. The results show that the multivariate models were the most efficient, predicting as much as 59 % of the variance in students’ emotional experiences. The two most important constructs were students’ type of motivation and perceived degree of learning, which together predicted 48 % of the students’ emotions. Single-construct models predicted, at most, 36 %. The relative and absolute predictive ability of different motivational constructs are reported. The relationships between constructs and their implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 40.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Relationships between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals: developmental trends over grades 5–112019In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 295-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examining how students' epistemic beliefs (EB) influence their cognition is central to EB research. Recently, the relation between students' EB and their motivation has gained attention. In the present study, we investigate the development of the relationship between students' EB and their achievement goals (AG) over grades 5–11. Previous studies on this topic are limited, in both number and range, and have produced inconsistent results. We performed a cross-sectional study, ranging over grades 5–11, and a 3-year longitudinal study (n = 1230 and 323, respectively). Data on students' EB and AG were collected via questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a two-factor goal model (Mastery and Performance goals) and a structure of students' EB comprising Certainty, Source, Development, and Justification. For each grade, students' CFA scores on the respective goals were regressed on their scores on the EB dimensions by orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis. Although results indicated a weak relation between students' EB and AG, trends in the cross-sectional data were largely replicated in the longitudinal study. Though naïve EB were in general associated with performance goals and sophisticated EB with mastery goals, the transition to upper secondary school was associated with changes in the relationship between students' EB and AG. We discuss how the commonly used formulations of EB items may affect their ability to measure the naïve-sophisticated continuum, in turn affecting the predictive roles of EB dimensions.

  • 41.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Taube, Fabian
    Hedman, Leif
    A comparative analysis of discussion quality in Face-to-Face and threaded discussion groupsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Winberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Thunberg, Hans
    Bengmark, Samuel
    Success-factors in Transition to University Mathematics for stronger and weaker secondary students2015In: Towards a Reflective Society: Synergies Between Learning, Teaching and Research. (Book of abstracts), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examined the relative importance of students’ grades from upper secondary school, and student characteristics (self-efficacy, motivation type, study habits and view on mathematics) for predicting achievement of first-year university students in mathematics intensive programs. Furthermore, the predictive importance of these variables at the beginning and at the end of the first year were investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projection to Least Squares (OPLS) analysis were used for the identification of constructs and analysis of the predictive power of the constructs, respectively. 

    Together, all the variables measured at the beginning of the year predicted 21% of the variation in students grades on the university courses, while they predicted 43% at the end of the course. If grades from upper secondary school were removed from the model, 14% respective 37% could be predicted. Specially, self-efficacy, motivation type, and study habits (in this order) pertaining to their university studies are better predictors than those pertaining to upper secondary school.

    Some differences in predictive patterns were found, depending on the level of the students’ mathematical knowledge when entering their university studies. Study habits was shown to be more important for predicting achievement for the third of the students’ with the lowest upper secondary grades than for the other groups. Relying on the textbook and frequent interaction with peers during the university studies predicted 12% of achievement for this group, whereas these aspects were not predictive at all for the groups with intermediate and high grades from upper secondary school.

  • 43.
    Winberg, T. Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Assessing discourse quality in threaded discussion groups: a comparison of methodologiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf