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  • 1.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Blankenburg, Janet
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    How Do Students’ Interest and Conceptual Understanding Develop Over the Time of Their Secondary Chemistry Education? First Results From the Binational Project DoLiS2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Siebert, Sara
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Digitising teaching and learning: additional perspectives for chemistry education2019In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 59, p. 554-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry requires and combines both observable and mental representations. Still we know that learners often struggle in combining these perspectives successfully, especially when experimental observations contradict the model-based explanations, e.g. in interpreting the chemical equilibrium as dynamic processes while observing a static system without any visible changes. Digital media offer potentials that might not have been accessible to this degree until now. However, we do not know enough with regard to the degree and effects these media tools have in supporting learning processes but perhaps also in hindering them. This article presents four approaches on how to potentially make use of digital media in learning processes based on theoretical considerations and empirical investigations. The projects will explore applications of media as visualization, learning and investigation tools in chemistry education, embracing techniques from virtual realities to eye-tracking.

  • 3.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Köhler, Christine
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Die Verständnisentwicklung zentraler Fachkonzepte in der Sekundarstufe2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Der Fachunterricht in der Sekundarstufe soll es Schülerinnen und Schülern ermöglichen, ein breites Verständnis grundlegender Konzepte zu erlernen. Verschiedene empirische Untersuchungen deuten jedoch darauf hin, dass dieses Lernziel nur eingeschränkt erreicht wird. Das Projekt DoLiS (Development of Learning in Science) zielt darauf ab, in mehreren Schritten Hinweise auf Umfang, Entwicklungswege und Einflussfaktoren des Konzeptverständnisses zu liefern. Kern der Studie ist eine quantitative Querschnittserhebung über die Jahrgangsstufen 5 bis 12, in der 2868 Schülerinnen und Schüler u.a. hinsichtlich ihres Konzeptverständnisses in den Bereichen Materie, Energie und chemische Reaktionen getestet wurden. Neben den Ergebnissen dieser ersten Erhebung soll aufbauend das Design einer Zwei-Kohorten-Längsschnittstudie vorgestellt werden, in der die beiden Jahrgangsstufen 5 und 9 sowohl quantitativ als auch qualitativ über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren begleitet werden sollen, um detaillierte Einblicke in individuelle Entwicklungsverläufe während der Sekundarstufe zu gewinnen.

  • 4.
    Blankenburg, Janet
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Interesse an naturwissenschaftlichen Tätigkeiten: Das RIASEC+N Modell2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    150-åring i nytt format2019In: Kemisk tidskrift, Vol. 1, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Addressing Critical Features of Context-Based Science Curricula2014In: NARST 2014: Annual International Conference Abstracts, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry: content, context and choices: towards students' higher order problem solving in upper secondary school2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry is often claimed to be difficult, irrelevant, and uninteresting to school students. Even students who enjoy doing science often have problems seeing themselves as being scientists. This thesis explores and challenges the negative perception of chemistry by investigating upper secondary students’ views on the subject. Based on students’ ideas for improving chemistry education to make the subject more interesting and meaningful, new learning approaches rooted in context-based learning (CBL) are presented. CBL approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking.

    Students’ views on upper secondary school chemistry classes in combination with their problem- solving strategies and application of chemistry content knowledge when solving context-based chemistry tasks were investigated using a mixed methods approach. Questionnaire responses, written solutions to chemistry problems, classroom observations, and think-aloud interviews with upper secondary students at the Natural Science Programme and with experts working on context- based chemistry tasks were analysed to obtain a general overview and explore specific issues in detail.

    Several students were identified who had positive feelings about chemistry, found it interesting, and chose to continue with it beyond the compulsory level, mainly with the aim of future university studies or simply because they enjoyed it. Their suggestions for improving school chemistry by connecting it to everyday life prompted an exploration of CBL approaches. Studies on the cognitive learning outcomes arising from the students’ work on context-based tasks revealed that school chemistry heavily emphasises the recall of memorised facts. However, there is evidence of higher order thinking when students’ problem-solving processes are scaffolded using hints based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C). In addition, the contextualisation of problems is identified as something that supports learning rather than distracting students.

    To conclude, the students in this thesis are interested in chemistry and enjoy chemistry education, and their motives for choosing to study chemistry at the post-compulsory level are related to their aspirations; students’ identity formation is important for their choices. Because students are accustomed to recalling facts and solving chemistry problems that have “one single correct answer”, they find more open problems that demand higher order thinking (e.g. knowledge transfer) unfamiliar and complex, suggesting that such processes should be practiced more often in school chemistry. 

  • 8.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry: context, content and choices: Is school chemistry in crisis?2015In: Kemivärlden Biotech med Kemisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1653-5596, no 1, p. 33-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry Teachers' Development of Relevant and Interesting Context-Based Open-Ended Problems2019In: ESERA 2019: 2019 ESERA conference in Bologna, Italy, August 26-30, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches have become popular in several parts of the world. The intentions with this more unconventional teaching and learning approach are to frame content knowledge into interesting and relevant contexts and to engage students to higher interest, and thereby, hopefully, increased learning. An educational challenge has been to design suitable tasks adapted to both affective and cognitive aspects. To assess students’ chemistry content knowledge, tasks possible to use in class need to be developed, and to make the tasks interesting and relevant to the students, the teachers are central. In this project, chemistry teachers attending two different teacher conferences have worked together with a chemistry education researcher to develop context-based everyday-life open-ended chemistry problems. In this presentation, the process of the development of the context-based problems will be explored, and the ongoing work where the problems are applied in class where students have worked together solving the problems will be discussed.

  • 10.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Collaboration between university and school – how do we make use of each other’s competencies?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Finding and elaborating frameworks for analysing context-based chemistry problems2016In: Narratives of doctoral studies in science education: making the transition from educational practitioner to researcher / [ed] Shirley Simon, Christina Ottander, and Ilka Parchmann, Routledge, 2016, p. 128-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Kemikurs i förändring – Virtual Reality2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Kjemi i krise?2011In: Naturfag, ISSN 1504-4564, no 1, p. 74-77Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Läsecirklar - ett sätt att arbeta med kollegialt lärande kring naturvetenskapernas didaktik2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Role models affecting students’ secondary and tertiary educational choices2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest and identity are perspectives often explored when discussing students' educational choices. In Sweden, students have the possibility to choose (or not to choose) a STEM-focused education both at secondary level between grade 9 and 10, and towards university level after grade 12. In this study, interviews have been made with students in the end of grade 12 to investigate which aspects they highlight as important in their choices, both how they already have chosen between lower and upper secondary and how they plan to choose for tertiary level. The study analyses students' perceived interest as well as identity perspectives. Moreover, role models have in previous research been stated as fundamental for influencing students in their educational choices. Therefore, interest, identity and role models are in focus of this study where Eccles et al.´s (1983) expectancy-value model is used as a theoretical lens to further elaborate students' own ideas on educational choices towards STEM in general, and the career of medical doctors and engineers in specific.

  • 16.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Spelifiering och kemi – metod för ökad motivation2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Upper Secondary School Students' Opinions On How To Improve Their Chemistry Education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel university, Germany.
    A Mature Examination of Juvenile Technologies in Science Education2019In: ESERA 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Era has influenced education for quite some time, and after the hype that technology is “everything”, digitalisation of education needs to be scrutinised in a sensible and mature way. In several countries, a top-down approach from politicians and stakeholders state that digital tools must be implemented to improve students’ learning. Since there are several available types of digital tools, often developed by people with explicit competence in technology and perhaps not a chemistry competence, we find it important to explore and examine how these tools are helpful for students in their learning processes. In this symposium, we want to discuss how juvenile technologies influence students’ cognitive and affective learning and which aspects an implementation of these technologies need to take into account in order to enhance students’ learning.

  • 19.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Interest and relevance as aspects of context-based chemistry problems2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer. Both qualitative interview data and quantitative survey data will be explored in relation to interest frameworks to discuss students’ perceived interest and relevance.

  • 20.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Relevance or interest? Students’ affective responses towards contextual settings in chemistry problems2017In: NFSUN: Nordiske Forskersymposium om Undervisning i Naturfag. Abstracts / [ed] Astrid Johansen, John Magne Grindeland, 2017, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer.

  • 21.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Analysing Task Design and Students’ Responses to Context-Based Problems Through Different Analytical Frameworks2015In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 143-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Context-based learning approaches are used to enhance students’ interest in, and knowledge about, science. According to different empirical stud- ies, students’ interest is improved by applying these more non-conventional approaches, while effects on learning outcomes are less coherent. Hence, further insights are needed into the structure of context-based problems in comparison to traditional problems, and into students’ problem-solving strategies. Therefore, a suitable framework is necessary, both for the analysis of tasks and strategies. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore traditional and context-based tasks as well as students’ responses to exemplary tasks to identify a suitable frame- work for future design and analyses of context-based problems. The paper dis- cusses different established frameworks and applies the Higher-Order Cognitive Skills/Lower-Order Cognitive Skills (HOCS/LOCS) taxonomy and the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C) to analyse traditional tasks and students’ responses. Sample: Upper secondary students (n=236) at the Natural Science Programme, i.e. possible future scientists, are investigated to explore learning outcomes when they solve chemistry tasks, both more conventional as well as context-based chemistry problems. Design and methods: A typical chemistry examination test has been analysed, first the test items in themselves (n=36), and thereafter 236 students’ responses to one representative context-based problem. Content analysis using HOCS/ LOCS and MHC-C frameworks has been applied to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data, allowing us to describe different problem-solving strategies. Results: The empirical results show that both frameworks are suitable to identify students’ strategies, mainly focusing on recall of memorized facts when solving chemistry test items. Almost all test items were also assessing lower order think- ing. The combination of frameworks with the chemistry syllabus has been found successful to analyse both the test items as well as students’ responses in a sys- tematic way. The framework can therefore be applied in the design of new tasks, the analysis and assessment of students’ responses, and as a tool for teachers to scaffold students in their problem-solving process. Conclusions: This paper gives implications for practice and for future research to both develop new context-based problems in a structured way, as well as pro- viding analytical tools for investigating students’ higher order thinking in their responses to these tasks.

  • 22.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and content: Upper secondary students’ strategies when solving context-based chemistry problems2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking. One way to develop higher order thinking is through the use of meaningful tasks, in this study perceived as context-based chemistry tasks. To explore students’ problem-solving strategies when approaching these tasks, both students’ responses as well as scaffolding from the interviewer using the Model of Hierarchical Complexity (MHC-C) have been analysed. Through think-aloud interviews with 20 upper secondary students who solved context-based chemistry tasks, results show that students are used to lower order thinking and stating “the correct answer” by memorising factual knowledge. Two different groups of problem-solving strategies will be presented in the presentation, one group of students who only gave responses through recall of factual knowledge, and one group who gave responses not only by stating facts but instead also could explain structure-property relationships on their own. However, both groups of students could develop their responses and improve their problem solving through scaffolding from the interviewer’s use of MHC-C operators (i.e. name, describe, and explain). If students are going to solve problems not only through recall of facts, the process of problem-solving has to be practiced and emphasised in school;; not only the task’s response in itself is important if we want students to learn chemistry in a meaningful way. Teachers can develop their students’ problem-solving strategies by scaffolding using suitable frameworks, such as the MHC-C. Besides making students aware of higher ordering thinking, one way to practice such skills is through reasoning and argumentation;; when students develop their argumentation skills, they also challenge their thinking. For argumentation to be rewarding, it must rely on both facts and higher order cognitive skills as transfer, critical thinking and asking questions. 

  • 23.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and Topic: Which Aspects of Context-Based Chemistry Problems Do Upper Secondary Students Perceive Most Relevant and Interesting?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Using Model-based Scaffolds to Support Students Solving Context-based Chemistry Problems2018In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1176-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning aims to make learning more meaningful by raising meaningful problems. However, these types of problems often require reflection and thinking processes that are more complex and thus more difficult for students, putting high demands on students’ problem-solving capabilities. In this paper, students’ approaches when solving context-based chemistry problems and effects of systematic scaffolds are analysed based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity. Most answers were initially assigned to the lowest level of the model; higher levels were reached without scaffolds only by few students and by most students with scaffolds. The results are discussed with regard to practical implications in terms of how teachers could make use of context-based tasks and aligned scaffolds to help students in this activity.

  • 25.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    School of Education, Malmö university.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chemistry in crisis?: Perspectives on teaching and learning chemistry in Swedish upper secondary schools2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations for a decline in the number of students studying chemistry at advanced level all over the world have been sought for quite some time. Many students do not find chemistry relevant and meaningful and there have been difficulties in developing school chemistry courses that engage students sufficiently and tempt them to further studies in the field. In this study, Swedish upper secondary school students (Ns=372) and their teachers (Nt=18) answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the content and the working methods of their chemistry course. They were also given the opportunity to express ideas on how to make chemistry courses more interesting and meaningful. The results point out some subject areas as both easy and interesting, e.g. atomic structure; while other areas are hard to understand but still interesting, e.g. biochemistry. The students find chemistry lessons teacher-centred, something they appreciate. When teachers and students gave suggestions on how to improve the relevance of chemistry education at upper secondary level, more laboratory work and connections to everyday life were the most common proposals. But on the whole, these students seem quite satisfied with their chemistry courses.

  • 26.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipped Learning as a New Approach for University Organic Chemistry2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipping the class: University chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching and learning approach2019In: Chemistry Teacher International, ISSN 2569-3263, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 20180004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar conventional approach to teaching, with chem- istry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education with positive results. In particular, US innovations in this area have made positive im- pressions on Swedish university chemistry educators, resulting in an interest and curiosity in integrating a flipped model into the course curricula. The rationale behind flipped learning is to incorporate an active learn- ing approach into lecture, thereby increasing both student engagement and learning outcomes. In this paper, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning, will be presented. The focus in this mixed-methods study will be on students’ cognitive and affective responses when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. Through following a project where a conventional approach to an organic chemistry course is changed into a more student-active focus, we elaborate on implications for course development of chemistry curricula.

  • 28.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipping the class: university chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar approach to teaching, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this study, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented. The focus will be on students’ experiences when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. 

  • 29.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Organic chemistry going ‘flipped’ – university students’ perceptions of a new teaching and learning approach2019In: European Variety In Chemistry Education 2019: Abstract Booklet, 2019, p. 32-32Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    To flip or not to flip: Students’ use of the learning material in a flipped university organic chemistry course2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have had a similar approach to teaching for a long time, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this presentation, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented.

  • 31.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Application of Digital Tools in Chemistry Education: Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Gamification2019In: 2019 ESERA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a politician-decided top-down implementation of digital tools into the school curricula, chemistry education researchers and teacher educators try to develop relevant and meaningful digital tools possible to use to increase students’ learning. To exemplify and explore the impact of digital tools on students’ learning processes, two chemistry education projects are discussed in this presentation. When are digital tools applicable to enhance learning and how should teachers embed and frame this application of the digital tools? The projects present how Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR) and gamification can be used to enhance students’ perceived interest and value.

  • 32.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Digital Tools in Chemistry Education - Virtual/Augmented Reality & Gamification2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Virtual reality i kemiundervisningen: hur kan man arbeta med digitalisering?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Virtual and augmented reality – a way to develop university students; spatial ability in organic chemistry2019In: European Variety In Chemistry Education 2019: Abstract Booklet, 2019, p. 24-24Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Students’ application of chemical concepts when solving chemistry problems in different contexts2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning approaches have been implemented in school science over the last 40 years as a way to enhance students’ interest in, as well as learning outcomes from, science. Contexts are used to connect science with the students’ lives and to provide a frame in which concepts can be learned and applied on a ‘need-to-know’-principle. While effects on interest are coherently reported as positive, they are more diverse regarding cognitive learning outcomes. Hence, the demand for further research on criteria of context-based problems and problem-solving processes has been stated. In this talk, a study is presented investigating students’ application of chemical concepts when solving context-based chemistry problems. Tasks for context-based problem solving have been designed systematically, using different combinations of contexts, topics and chemistry concepts in relation to the syllabus. Empirical data were collected using think-aloud interviews where 20 upper secondary students used their chemical content knowledge to solve the problems. The 15 context-based problems raised challenges within organic chemistry where concepts like electronegativity, polarity and solubility had to be applied. The difficulty to differentiate between intra- and intermolecular bonding emphasised in earlier research has also been apparent in this study. Besides the structural formula, which was an important part for the students when solving the tasks, the contextualisation of the problems was often used in the responses; students related their answers to the personal, societal or professional context in different ways. Results will be discussed and implications for context-based teaching, learning and assessment will be given.

  • 36.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Students' application of chemical concepts when solving chemistry problems in different contexts2014In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1756-1108, E-ISSN 1756-1108, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 516-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning approaches have been implemented in school science over the last 40 years as a way to enhance students' interest in, as well as learning outcomes from, science. Contexts are used to connect science with the students' lives and to provide a frame in which concepts can be learned and applied on a ‘need-to-know’-principle. While effects on interest are coherently reported as positive, they are more diverse regarding cognitive learning outcomes. Hence, the demand for further research on criteria of context-based problems and problem-solving processes has been stated. In this paper, a study is presented investigating students' application of chemical concepts when solving context-based chemistry problems. Tasks for context-based problem solving have been designed systematically, using different combinations of contexts, topics and chemistry concepts in relation to the syllabus. Empirical data were collected using think-aloud interviews where 20 upper secondary students used their chemical content knowledge to solve the problems. The 15 context-based problems raised challenges within organic chemistry where concepts like electronegativity, polarity and solubility had to be applied. The difficulty to differentiate between intra- and intermolecular bonding emphasised in earlier research has also been apparent in this study. Besides the structural formula, which was an important part for the students when solving the tasks, the contextualisation of the problems was often used in the responses; students related their answers to the personal, societal or professional context in different ways. The paper explores the results and gives implications for context-based teaching, learning and assessment.

  • 37.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Upper Secondary Students’ Application of Content Knowledge When Solving Context-Based Chemistry Problems2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Kiel.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Kiel.
    Context-based items – systematic analyses of task difficulty, task interest and problem-solving strategies2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Swine flu and Tamiflu®: context-based chemistry in Swedish upper secondary school2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Simon, Shirley
    Institute of Education, University of London, UK.
    Upper secondary school students' choice and their ideas on how to improve chemistry education2015In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1255-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there is concern about fewer students taking chemistry courses in higher education, especially at university level. Using a survey, this study investigates the reasons upper secondary school chemistry students choose to follow the Swedish Natural Science Programme. In addition, students’ views about their chemistry education are sought and their ideas about how to improve their chemistry experience. A questionnaire with closed and open questions was completed by 495 chemistry students from different schools in Sweden. The analysis shows that most students have high interest-enjoyment value of chemistry, but both positive and negative responses about their chemistry education refer to the importance of the teacher and the structure of lessons. To improve their chemistry experience, students suggest making it relevant to everyday life and being more practical and more student centred. For positively inclined students to maintain their value of chemistry beyond schooling into choice at university level, the programme should take these suggestions into account. 

  • 41.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The use of Augmented Reality Technology in Chemistry Teaching2019In: Fjärde nationella konferensen i Pedagogiskt arbete, Umeå, 19-20 augusti, 2019 / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Umeå, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose/goals: Traditionally in chemistry teaching, molecules are visualized on paper or on a whiteboard/screen, i.e. the molecule is drawn in 2D. However, one basic problem many students are struggling with in basic organic chemistry is the conceptual transition (e.g. from 2D to 3D), and research has shown that spatial thinking is very important for the understanding of chemistry [1][2]. This presentation reports on a study exploring how university students are perceiving the use of augmented reality technology (AR) in chemistry teaching. More specifically, the aim is to explore and understand what opportunities and challenges students perceive when using AR-technology for enhancing their transition from a 2D representation of a molecule to the 3D structure visualised by AR-glasses.

    Method: The study was conducted during the spring of 2019 where a group of university students were able to ‘see’ the 3D structure of a nicotine molecule by using AR-glasses. The empirical material is based on discussions during the test and 14 surveys which the students answered anonymously afterwards.

    Theoretical framing: Design-based methods were used in the study [3] for exploring the possibilities as well as the challenges students meet when using, for them, such a new emerging technology as AR. For encoding the collected material, thematic analysis [4] was used for identifying key themes and emerging patterns.

    Conclusions: The first preliminary findings illustrate both possibilities and challenges when using AR-technology in chemistry teaching. For example, the students expressed an immersive experience and the 3D molecule was perceived as a very real object in the room, and in addition, felt that the amount of information was larger compared to 2D. The challenges concern quite a narrow field of view of the AR-glasses, and the students would like to have several different molecules to be visualized at the same time so as to be able to compare them with how they actually are represented in 3D.

  • 42.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Podschuweit, Sören
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Energie aus Kohle und Batterien?: Kontextaufgaben zum Diagnostizieren und Lernen2015In: Unterricht Chemie, ISSN 0946-2139, Vol. 26, no 149, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43. Parchmann, Ilka
    et al.
    Blonder, Ron
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Context-based chemistry learning: The relevance of chemistry for citizenship and Responsible Research and Innovation2017In: Contextualizing teaching to improving learning: The case of Science and Geography / [ed] Laurinda Leite, Luís Dourado, Ana S. Afonso and Sofia Morgado, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017, p. 25-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Chemistry is related to almost every material, question, and topic. Chemical reactions take place in every living organism, in the environment, and in the industrial production of all the different products we use. Still it has a negative connotation for many laypersons. Educational links between contexts and the multi-perspective facets of chemistry aim to develop a better foundation for citizenship and responsible research and innovation (RRI). This chapter will give reasons for and explore such approaches of context-based learning in chemistry.

  • 44.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Busker, Maike
    University of Flensburg, Germany.
    Rudnik, Julian
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context-Based Teaching and Learning on School and University Level2015In: Chemistry Education: Best Practices, Innovative Strategies and New Technologies / [ed] Garcia-Martinez, J., Serrano-Torregrosa, E., Berlin: Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2015, p. 259-278Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    et al.
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Rudnik, Julian
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Busker, Maike
    University of Flensburg, Germany.
    Context-based learning in different environments: design and approaches of answering context-based tasks in school, out-of-school and university learning environments2014In: The 23rd IUPAC International Conference on Chemistry Education (ICCE 2014): Developing Learning Communities in the Chemical Science, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (cbl) is well established in science education, as a guideline for curriculum development as well as a topic for research. While in Europe, most research and development focused on school level, Canadian amd American approaches provide impressive examples for context-based learning in higher education. In our projects we use context-based tasks for learners in different environments and on different levels of education, such as regular teaching on secondary level (Nentwig et al., 2007; Parchmann et al., submitted), out-of-school learning in so called sutdent-labs for primary (Dunker et al., in press) and secondary school students (Schwarzer et al., 2013), and for tutorials on university level (Parchmann et al., submitted). In this presentation we will explore the design criteria for cbl-tasks referring to the different groups of learners and to the different learning situations. We will also give insights into first results of analyzing students' approahces of working with cbl-tasks.

1 - 45 of 45
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