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  • 1. de Bruijn, Winnie
    et al.
    Ibanez, Cristina
    Frisk, Pia
    Pedersen, Hanne Bak
    Alkan, Ali
    Bonanno, Patricia Vella
    Brkicic, Ljiljana S.
    Bucsicsa, Anna
    Dedet, Guillaume
    Eriksen, Jaran
    Fadare, Joseph O.
    Furst, Jurij
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia.
    Godoi, Isabella P.
    Guerra Junior, Augusto A.
    Gursoz, Hakki
    Jan, Saira
    Jones, Jan
    Joppi, Roberta
    Kerman, Saim
    Laius, Ott
    Madzikwa, Newman
    Magnusson, Einar
    Maticic, Mojca
    Markovic-Pekovic, Vanda
    Massele, Amos
    Ogunleye, Olayinka
    O'Leary, Aisling
    Piessnegger, Jutta
    Sermet, Catherine
    Simoens, Steven
    Tiroyakgosi, Celda
    Truter, Ilse
    Thyberg, Magnus
    Tomekova, Kristina
    Wladysiuk, Magdalena
    Vandoros, Sotiris
    Vural, Elif H.
    Zara, Corinne
    Godman, Brian
    Introduction and Utilization of High Priced HCV Medicines across Europe: Implications for the Future2016In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 7, article id 197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infection with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a widespread transmittable disease with a diagnosed prevalence of 2.0%. Fortunately, it is now curable in most patients. Sales of medicines to treat HCV infection grew 2.7% per year between 2004 and 2011, enhanced by the launch of the protease inhibitors (Hs) boceprevir (BCV) and telaprevir (TVR) in addition to ribavirin and pegylated interferon (pegIFN). Costs will continue to rise with new treatments including sofosbuvir, which now include interferon free regimens. Objective: Assess the uptake of BCV and TVR across Europe from a health authority perspective to offer future guidance on dealing with new high cost medicines. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive study of medicines to treat HCV (pegIEN, ribavirin, BCV and TVR) among European countries from 2008 to 2013. Utilization measured in defined daily doses (DDDs)/1000 patients/quarter (DIOs) and expenditure in Euros/DDD. Health authority activities to influence treatments categorized using the 4E methodology (Education, Engineering, Economics and Enforcement). Results: Similar uptake of BCV and TVR among European countries and regions, ranging from 0.5 DIQ in Denmark, Netherlands and Slovenia to 1.5 DIQ in Tayside and Catalonia in 2013. However, different utilization of the new Pls vs. ribavirin indicates differences in dual vs. triple therapy, which is down to factors including physician preference and genotypes. Reimbursed prices for BCV and TVR were comparable across countries. Conclusion: There was reasonable consistency in the utilization of BCV and TVR among European countries in comparison with other high priced medicines. This may reflect the social demand to limit the transmission of HCV. However, the situation is changing with new curative medicines for HCV genotype 1 (GT1) with potentially an appreciable budget impact. These concerns have resulted in different prices across countries, with their impact on budgets and patient outcomes monitored in the future to provide additional guidance.

  • 2.
    Englund, Claire
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library, Centre for teaching and learning (UPL).
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Australia, New South Wales 2010, Australia.
    Pharmacy Students' Attitudes and Perceptions of "Virtual Worlds" as an Instructional Tool for Clinical Pharmacy Teaching2017In: Pharmacy, ISSN 2226-4787, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to explore pharmacy students’ perceptions and experiences of three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVWs) as an instructional tool for clinical pharmacy teaching. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with Master of Science in Pharmacy students who had participated in communicative exercises in a 3DVW. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. More than half of the students were positive to using 3DVWs for educational purposes and see the advantages of having a setting where communication can be practiced in an authentic but ‘safe’ environment available online. However, many students also reported technical difficulties in using the 3DVW which impacted negatively on the learning experience. Perceived ease of use and usefulness of 3DVWs appears to play an important role for students. The students’ level of engagement relates to not only their computer skills, but also to the value they place on 3DVWs as an instructional tool.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Englund, Claire
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library, Centre for teaching and learning (UPL).
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, 160 Oxford Street, Darlinghurst, New South Wales 2010, Australia.
    The description and evaluation of virtual worlds in clinical pharmacy education in Northern Sweden2017In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1877-1297, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 887-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the use of a three-dimensional virtual world (3DVW) in a clinical pharmacy course.

    Educational activity and setting: Students are provided with training opportunities in simulated ward rounds and patient meetings in a 3DVW. The 3DVW enables students to practice communication with patients and colleagues in a professional manner. To evaluate the course and use of the 3DVW, an online course evaluation was completed by students after they had finished the clinical pharmacy course.

    Findings: Forty-two students completed the online course evaluation (62%). Most students (83%) reported that they could adopt the role of a clinical pharmacist in the 3DVW. Sixty percent reported that the environment felt authentic, although some noted that “it can never be quite the same as sitting next to a real person to talk”. More than half of the students (66%) described the use of the 3DVW as a worthwhile exercise. The majority (93%) rated the overall quality of the course as good or very good, with 76% reporting that the pedagogical design of the course helped them with their studies.

    Discussion and summary: Students at Umeå University valued the use of 3DVWs in clinical pharmacy teaching. However, there is a need to make the virtual environment more realistic and easier to use. The invaluable feedback gathered from students will help to improve the future use of virtual worlds in pharmacy education.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Australia, Darlinghurst, Australia.
    Where there is no pharmacist: doctors' and nurses' expectations on the implementation of clinical pharmacy services in rural Sweden2017In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 216-216, article id HP-PC011Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Haynes, Abby
    et al.
    Butow, Phyllis
    Brennan, Sue
    Williamson, Anna
    Redman, Sally
    Carter, Stacy
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience. The University of Notre Dame, Sydney, Australia.
    Rudge, Sian
    The pivotal position of 'liaison people': facilitating a research utilisation intervention in policy agencies2018In: Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, ISSN 1744-2648, E-ISSN 1744-2656, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 7-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the enormous variation in views, championing behaviours and impacts of liaison people: staff nominated to facilitate, tailor and promote SPIRIT (a research utilisation intervention trial in six Australian health policy agencies). Liaison people made cost/benefit analyses: they weighed the value of participation against its risks and demands in the context of organisational goals, knowledge utilisation norms, epistemology and leadership support. There was a degree of self-fulfilment (organisations got what they put in), but SPIRIT could not always be tailored to address local knowledge needs. We present nine propositions for identifying and supporting liaison people in similar interventions.

  • 6.
    Sjölander, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. Univ Notre Dame Australia, Sch Med, 160 Oxford St, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia.
    Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of a ward-based pharmacist in rural northern Sweden2017In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 953-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This project is part of the prospective quasi experimental proof-of-concept investigation of clinical pharmacist intervention study to reduce drug-related problems among people admitted to a ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Objective To explore doctors' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of having a ward-based pharmacist providing clinical pharmacy services. Setting Medical ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Method Eighteen face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of doctors and nurses working on the ward where the clinical pharmacy service was due to be implemented. Semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measure Perceptions and expectations of nurses and doctors. Results Doctors and nurses had limited experience of working with pharmacists. Most had a vague idea of what pharmacists can contribute within a ward setting. Participants, mainly nurses, suggested inventory and drug distribution roles, but few were aware of the pharmacists' skills and clinical competence. Different views were expressed on whether the new clinical pharmacy service would have an impact on workload. However, most participants took a positive view of having a ward-based pharmacist. Conclusion This study provided an opportunity to explore doctors' and nurses' expectations of the role of clinical pharmacists before a clinical pharmacy service was implemented. To successfully implement a clinical pharmacy service, roles, clinical competence and responsibilities should be clearly described. Furthermore, it is important to focus on collaborative working relationships between doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

  • 7.
    Vinterflod, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Mattsson, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience. School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Darlinghurst, Australia.
    Physicians' perspectives on clinical pharmacy services in Northern Sweden: a qualitative study2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In many countries, clinical pharmacists are part of health care teams that work to optimize drug therapy and ensure patient safety. However, in Sweden, clinical pharmacy services (CPSs) in hospital settings have not been widely implemented and regional differences exist in the uptake of these services. Physicians' attitudes toward CPSs and collaborating with clinical pharmacists may facilitate or hinder the implementation and expansion of the CPSs and the role of the clinical pharmacist in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to explore physicians' perceptions regarding CPSs performed at hospital wards in Northern Sweden.

    Methods: Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of nine physicians who had previously worked with clinical pharmacists between November 2014 and January 2015. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using a constant comparison method.

    Results: Different themes emerged regarding physicians' views of clinical pharmacy; two main interlinked themes were service factors and pharmacist factors. The service was valued and described in a positive way by all physicians. It was seen as an opportunity for them to learn more about pharmacological treatment and also an opportunity to discuss patient medication treatment in detail. Physicians considered that CPSs could improve patient outcomes and they valued continuity and the ability to build a trusting relationship with the pharmacists over time. However, there was a lack of awareness of the CPSs. All physicians knew that one of the pharmacist's roles is to conduct medication reviews, but most of them were only able to describe a few elements of what this service encompasses. Pharmacists were described as "drug experts" and their recommendations were perceived as clinically relevant. Physicians wanted CPSs to continue and to be implemented in other wards.

    Conclusions: All physicians were positive regarding CPSs and were satisfied with the collaboration with the clinical pharmacists. These findings are important for further implementation and expansion of CPSs, particularly in Northern Sweden.

  • 8. Wilson, Nathan J.
    et al.
    Macdonald, Jemima
    Hayman, Brenda
    Bright, Alexandra M.
    Frawley, Patsie
    Gallego, Gisselle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    A narrative review of the literature about people with intellectual disability who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning2018In: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1744-6295, E-ISSN 1744-6309, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 171-196Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This narrative review of the research literature presents a summary about the key issues facing people with intellectual disability (ID) who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning (LGBTIQ). The aim of this review was to consolidate research of the topic; to identify whether any pilot studies reporting social/sexual/educational interventions had been published; and to offer some perspective on the type of future research required to better inform policy, practice and theory that may lead to better outcomes for people with ID who identify as LGBTIQ. Almost all of the research literature on the topic is either exploratory or descriptive which serves to outline the range of issues faced by people with ID who identify as LGBTIQ. Urgently needed as the next step, however, is a concerted effort to conduct a range of innovative educational and social interventions with collection of targeted and appropriate outcomes data.

1 - 8 of 8
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