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  • 1.
    Boman, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Valuing the wolf in Sweden: Are benefits contingent upon the supply?1999In: Topics in environmental economics / [ed] Boman, Mattias, Brännlund, Runar & Kriström, Bengt, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, 157-174 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Boman, Mattias
    et al.
    SkogD, Konjunkturinstitutet.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Institutionen för Skogsekonomi, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Hörnsten, Lisa
    SkogD, ETOUR, Mitthögskolan i östersund.
    Skogens alternativa nyttjandeformer2002In: Statlig skog och skyddad mark: Del 2 Organisationsförslag, Bilaga 3 / [ed] Statsskogsutredningen, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2002, 167-202 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Boman, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kriström, Bengt
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Obtaining welfare bounds in discrete-response valuation studies: A non-parametric approach1999In: Land Economics, ISSN 0023-7639, E-ISSN 1543-8325, Vol. 75, no 2, 284-294 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welfare change estimates obtained from discrete-response contingent valuation experiments normally assume a particular distribution of willingness-to-pay (WTP). Using conventional microeconomy theory, we derive upper and lower bounds on such  estimates. These bounds are interpreted statistically in terms of non-parametric estimators of mean WTP and its variance. Two contingent valuation surveys illustrate the proposed bounds, and the performances of the variance estimators are scrutinized with a Monte Carlo simulation. All calculations can be made by hand, .simplifying communication among those involved in interpreting results from contingent valuation studies using discrete-response data. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 4.
    Boman, Mattias
    et al.
    SLU.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Persson, Jens
    SLU.
    The bioeconomics of the spatial distribution of an endangered species: The case of the Swedish wolf population2003In: Journal of Bioeconomics, ISSN 1387-6996, E-ISSN 1573-6989, Vol. 5, 55-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Institutionen för skogsekonomi, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Bevara arter – kan det löna sig?2005In: Bevara arter – till vilket pris?: balansgång mellan ekologiska, ekonomiska och sociala aspekter / [ed] Johansson, Birgitta, Stockholm: Formas , 2005, 201-208 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    John C. Bergström & Alan Randall (2010): Resource Economics: An Economic Approach to Natural Resource and Environmental Policy2013In: Marine Resource Economics, ISSN 0738-1360, Vol. 27Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Naturresurs- och skogsekonomi2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Pastoralist Economic Behaviour – Empirical Results from Reindeer Herders in Northern Sweden.2005In: Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, ISSN 1068-5502, E-ISSN 2327-8285, Vol. 30, 381-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umel, Sweden.
    Pastoralist economic behaviour: Empirical results from reindeer herders in Northern Sweden2005In: Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, ISSN 1068-5502, Vol. 30, no 2, 381-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a model of pastoralists, as illustrated by reindeer herders, together with an analysis based on a cross-sectional data set on Swedish reindeer-herding Saami. The intrinsic utility of being an active reindeer herder plays an important role in determining supply. Results show this can lead to unconventional supply responses among pastoralists, and suggest that the probability of a backward-bending supply response increases with stock size. Further analyses confirm that reindeer herders with backward-bending supply curves have significantly larger herds than herders with conventional supply responses. Relaxed externalities from forestry would cause most herders to increase their slaughter.

  • 10.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Public goods in Swedish forests: Essays on nonmarket valuation and environmental policy1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Reindeer husbandry, the Swedish market for reindeer meat, and the Chernobyl effects2001In: Agricultural Economics, ISSN 0169-5150, E-ISSN 1574-0862, Vol. 26, no 3, 217-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer husbandry is a cornerstone in the culture of the Sami, northern Scandinavia’s indigenous people. This paper presents a dynamic, theoretical model of the Swedish reindeer husbandry and the market for reindeer meat, as well as econometric results based on three-stage least squares regression on annual data. The most striking feature of the empirical results is a “backward-sloping” supply function, which is consistent with the theoretical model. The results also show effects of the Chernobyl accident. Prevailing winds at the time of the accident carried radioactive fallout over the grazing areas for the Swedish reindeer husbandry, causing effects on both supply and demand.

  • 12.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Deptartment of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Review: Thomas Sterner (2003): Policy instruments for environmental and natural resource management2003In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, Vol. 9, no 1, 65-66 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Deptartment of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Styrmedel i skogsbruket2003In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademins Tidskrift, Vol. 142, 109-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Threatened species as public goods and public bads: An application to wild predators in Sweden1999In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 13, no 1, 59-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Pareto efficient allocations of an environmental commodity, which is both a public good and a public bad, with an application to the Scandinavian problem of conserving wild predators that are killing semi-domesticated reindeer. The paper begins by briefly outlining this conflict. This is followed by a theoretical analysis employing a diagrammatic tool called the Kolm triangle, which is an analogue of an Edgeworth box in an economy with a public good. Bargaining, Pareto improving reallocations and the shape of the Pareto set are discussed, using a simple model, where one of the agents is involountarily contributing to a public good. The paper concludes with an analysis of income-loss compensations and incentives for illegal hunting of predators.

  • 15.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Boman, Mattias
    Nonresponse in Contingent Valuation – Reducing Uncertainty in Value Inference.1996In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 8, 119-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Boman, Mattias
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Nonresponse in contingent valuation: Reducing uncertainty in value inference1996In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 8, no 1, 119-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on problems associated with nonresponse in Contingent Valuation surveys. The results from a telephone follow-up survey show that value inference can be considerably improved by information on nonrespondents' attitudes.

  • 17.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Balancing industrial and recreational use of forests: A review of empirical studies2008In: CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources, Vol. 3, 027-035 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of the forest and how it should be utilized is the subject of a heated debate. The objective of this study is to review the literature on the benefits and costs of forest conservation and the adaptations of forest management practices, to improve the forest landscape for recreation. The overview focuses mainly on studies in the Nordic countries published in the last 15 years. The benefit studies provide distinct conclusions regarding the preferences of recreational users: they tend to prefer old growth rather than young forests, and favour a mixture of conifers and broadleaves over a pure conifer stand. On the cost side, there seems to be a consensus that forest conservation for recreation or biodiversity purposes has an opportunity cost in terms of foregone timber revenues. However, there is no evidence from the reviewed studies that such a conservation policy would hamper economic growth in the regions that are directly subject to the policy. On the contrary, there is some evidence that conservation can have a positive effect on local economies, mostly the result of an economic diversification towards tourism and commercial recreation. Overall, there is a striking lack of connection between the benefits and costs of forest conservation. Very few benefit studies make the extra effort to estimate the cost of the changes in forest management that the respondents in the non-market valuation studies are asked to value. Thus, one suggestion for future research is to improve the use of various methods in practical applications to ensure that guidance is comprehensive for policy decision-making.

  • 18.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Rationality, fairness and the cost of distrust2012In: The Journal of Socio-Economics, ISSN 1053-5357, Vol. 41, no 4, 345-349 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Carlén, Ola
    SLU.
    Gisselman, Fredrik
    Enetjärn Natur AB.
    Persson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: En empirisk studie.2016Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). SLU.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Carlén, Ola
    SLU.
    Persson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: en konceptuell analys2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Huvudsyftet med föreliggande rapport är att på ett övergripande och konceptuellt plan beskriva innebörden av en samhällsekonomisk nytto- och kostnadsanalys, eller samhällsekonomisk bedömning, och hur en sådan kan och bör genomföras för att analysera samhällsnyttan av fiskefria områden. Vidare syftar rapporten till att exemplifiera vilken typ av empiriska data och metoder som finns tillgängliga för en sådan analys med hjälp av den fritidsfiskeundersökning som årligen görs i regi av Hav och Vattenmyndigheten.

  • 21.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Geijer, Erik
    SLU.
    Spridningseffekter och målkonflikter2014In: Samhällsekonomiska analyser av miljöprojekt: en vägledning / [ed] Kriström, Bengt & Bonta Bergman, M., Naturvårdsverket , 2014, 261-270 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Ekvall, Hans
    SLU.
    Övrig produktion: konflikt eller samspel med virkesproduktionen2009In: Skogsskötselns ekonomi, Jönköping: Skogsstyrelsen , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Ericsson, Göran
    SLU.
    Kindberg, Johan
    SLU.
    Contingent Values as Implicit Contracts – Estimating Minimum Legal Willingness To Pay for Conservation of Large Carnivores in Sweden.2008In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 39, 189-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Grahn, Pontus
    Department of Forest Economics, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Estimating cost functions for the four large carnivores in Sweden2008In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 68, no 1-2, 517-524 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish carnivore policy goal for the four large carnivores – wolverine (Gulo gulo), wolf (Canis lupus), brown bear (Ursus arctos) and lynx (Lynx lynx) – is to ensure a minimum viable population on a long-term basis. To reach this goal the policy restricts population regulation activities, like hunting (prohibited for wolverine and wolf and restricted for brown bear and lynx) in Sweden. For owners of semi-domesticated (i.e. reindeer), and domesticated (livestock) animals this policy and the existence of individuals of these four species results in externalities associated with predation.

    This paper presents econometric estimates of the predation and the social costs for these four species, based on ecological models of functional response. The data on costs is based on compensation provided to livestock owners by the Swedish government. The paper also applies these econometric estimates to predict the social cost per species when the population goals of the Swedish carnivore policy are reached. Based on out our model the wolverine and the lynx will impose the highest marginal, as well as total costs on society, given the current policy goals. The wolf is an efficient predator, but due to its geographical distribution in Sweden, its social costs are less than anticipated. The brown bear is largely omnivorous, thus resulting in relatively low social costs.

  • 25.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Nyberg, Gert
    SLU.
    Agroforestry Extension and Dietary Diversity: An Analysis of the Importance of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in West Pokot, Kenya2016In: Food Security, ISSN 1876-4517, E-ISSN 1876-4525, Vol. 8, no 1, 271-284 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, the challenges of nomadic, pastoralist systems are causing their slow but steady disappearance in favour of sedentary agropastoralism. This paper draws upon an existing household data set from a survey collected and organized by the Swedish non-governmental organization (NGO) Vi Agroforestry, directed at a livestock-based, agro-pastoralist area in West Pokot County, western Kenya. The study focuses on the question of food diversity and malnutrition and the role of agroforestry extension services, i.e. knowledge spread, transfer and development. Our basic hypothesis is that certain fruit and vegetable related food groups are under-consumed in West Pokot, especially in the dryland areas. The results of the study shows that agroforestry, combined with advice through extension efforts can imply a transition path for pastoralists which involves improved dietary diversity, especially concerning food groups that include roots, tubers, fruits and leafy vegetables. From the results certain restrictions that hinder this transition become clear. An important but often overlooked factor is lack of information and knowledge as a determinant of household behavior in developing countries. NGOs such as Vi Agroforestry can play an important role in overcoming this restriction by providing extension services. Developing countries in general are not information-rich environments, a fact that is especially the case for poor citizens living in rural areas. The paper illustrates that careful attention to the information and knowledge available to households is necessary when designing development cooperation.

  • 26.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Innala, Sophia
    SLU.
    Löfgren, Stefan
    SLU.
    Bishop, Kevin
    SLU.
    CBA av skogsmarks- och ytvattenkalkning2014In: Samhällsekonomiska analyser av miljöprojekt: en vägledning / [ed] Kriström , B. & Bonta Bergman, M., Naturvårdsverket , 2014, 60-79 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna fallstudie presenterar en CBA av skogsmarkskalkning under 2007. Mer specifikt, i studien, analyseras och jämförs de samhällsekonomiska konsekvenserna av olika typer av skogsmarkskalkning med våtmarks- och ytvattenkalkning. Effekterna av den naturliga återhämtningen inkluderas i analysen. Fallstudien följer inte exakt den steg-för-steg guide för CBA som presenteras i Del II Kapitel 2. Studien baseras på ett samarbete mellan institutionerna förskogsekonomi, SLU, Umeå (Bostedt & Innala) och miljöanalys, SLU, Uppsala (Löfgren & Bishop). Ursprungsrapporten är på svenska är Bostedt et al. (2008), men finns även utgiven på engelska i tidskriften Ambio (Bostedt et al., 2010).

  • 27.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Kindberg, Jonas
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Contingent values as implicit contracts: Estimating minimum legal willingness to pay for conservation of large carnivores in Sweden2008In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 39, no 2, 189-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mean willingness-to-pay (WTP) based on multiple bounded, discrete choice responses from contingent valuation surveys are normally obtained using some kind of parametric estimator. This paper instead exploits the possibility to interpret the response to the discrete-choice question as an implicit contract between the researcher and the respondent, resulting in a minimum legal WTP (MLW) estimator. Never previously used in valuation literature, it is used in this paper to estimate the WTP for the preservation of large carnivores in Sweden, based on a large scale, national survey. Results show that MLW estimates only were 12–19% of the comparable parametric estimates. In keeping with other results in contingent valuation literature, we find that the MLW estimates are positively related to the educational level, income and the fraction of urban population, while negatively related to age. Among the advantages of the MLW estimator is its transparency as well as the fact that it rests on a contractual notion of WTP.

  • 28.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Accounting for Cultural Heritage - A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration with Focus on Swedish Reindeer Husbandry.2010In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 69, 651-657 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics & Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Department of Forest Economics & Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Accounting for cultural heritage: A theoretical and empirical exploration with focus on Swedish reindeer husbandry2010In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 69, no 3, 651-657 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore some of the theoretical and empirical aspects of an economy which includes cultural capital. We use a simple dynamic growth model and the concept of a social accounting matrix (SAM) to illustrate how the addition of income flows and net changes of various natural and cultural resources can be incorporated into a broader measure of welfare. The Swedish reindeer industry, managed by the indigenous Sami people, is used as an example since it is generally regarded to have significant cultural heritage value, beyond its contribution to conventional national accounts. We discuss a theoretically correct compensation to a cultural sector for preserving and maintaining a cultural heritage. Furthermore, we attempt to estimate the cultural value of the Sámi Reindeer sector in Sweden using a CVM survey. The results suggest that the willingness to pay (per year) to maintain cultural heritage at least at the current level may be quite substantive, estimates showing it can be several times the industry's turnover per year.

  • 30.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Löfgren, Stefan
    Department of Aquatic Science and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Innala, Sophia
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Department of Aquatic Science and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Acidification remediation alternatives: Exploring the temporal dimension with cost benefit analysis2010In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 39, no 1, 40-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acidification of soils and surface waters caused by acid deposition is still a major problem in southern Scandinavia, despite clear signs of recovery. Besides emission control, liming of lakes, streams, and wetlands is currently used to ameliorate acidification in Sweden. An alternative strategy is forest soil liming to restore the acidified upland soils from which much acidified runoff originates. This cost–benefit analysis compared these liming strategies with a special emphasis on the time perspective for expected benefits. Benefits transfer was used to estimate use values for sport ffishing and nonuse values in terms of existence values. The results show that large-scale forest soil liming is not socioeconomically profitable, while lake liming is, if it is done efficiently—in other words, if only acidified surface waters are treated. The beguiling logic of “solving” an environmental problem at its source (soils), rather than continuing to treat the symptoms (surface waters), is thus misleading.

  • 31.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Inst för skogsekonomi, SLU Umeå.
    Löfgren, Stefan
    Inst för miljöanalys, SLU Uppsala.
    Innala, Sophia
    Inst för skogsekonomi, SLU Umeå.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Inst för miljöanalys, SLU Uppsala.
    Samhällsekonomisk konsekvensanalys av skogsmarks- och ytvattenkalkning2008Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Leif
    Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    A note of benefits and costs of adjusting forestry to meet recreational demands2006In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, Vol. 12, no 1, 75-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic studies concerning environmental functions of forests are often partial in the sense that they focus on either benefits or costs. In other words, benefit/cost analyses indicating whether it is economically motivated to change forestry to make it compatible with environmental demands are relatively rare. This benefit/cost analysis deals with the forest as recreation environment, where benefit estimates from a study conducted in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden, are compared with cost estimates from another study in the same county. It is shown that adjustments of forest management to meet recreational demands do largely affect both benefits and costs, and that the results are sensitive to how soon the effects on the recreation environment occur after the adjustments of forest management.

  • 33.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Leif
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Confrontation or compromise?: Determining the appropriate institutions for environmental conflict resolution1996In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, Vol. 2, no 2, 131-147 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Mattsson, Leif
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    The value of forests for tourism in Sweden1995In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 22, no 3, 671-680 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has a vast quantity of forests and the Right of Common Access allows tourists to freely enter any forest no matter who owns it. An economic valuation study was carried out in two tourism areas, one in the southern part of the country and one in the northern part. It was shown that a considerable portion of the value to tourists is attributable to forest characteristics. Furthermore, the results suggest that this value can be increased by modifying forest management practices; for example, by making clearcuts smaller, even if there were more of them, and by increasing the proportion of broad leaved trees in forest stands.

  • 35.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. European Forest Institute, North European Regional Office, SLU, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Forest Economics, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mustonen, Mika
    LUKE, Finland.
    Gong, Peichen
    SLU.
    Increasing Forest Biomass Supply in Northern Europe – Countrywide Estimates and Economic Perspectives2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 31, no 3, 314-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Woody biomass is the largest source of renewable energy in Europe, and the expected increase in demand for wood for energy purposes was the stimulus for writing this paper. Opportunities to increase the supply of forest biomass in the short and long term are discussed, as well as environmental side effects of intensive forest management. Focusing on northern Europe, national estimates of potential annual fellings and the corresponding potential amounts, simulated by the European Forest Information Scenario model, are then presented, as well as reported fellings. For the region as a whole, there seems to be substantial unused biophysical potential, although recent data from some countries indicate underestimated annual felling rates. We argue that an economic perspective is lacking in the debate about wood production for energy purposes in Europe and harvest potentials, and we discuss the effects of biophysical capacity limits in forest yield from a partial equilibrium perspective. Using a larger proportion of the biophysical potential in northern Europe than at present will entail trade-offs with environmental and social values, which means that strategies are needed to protect and account for the benefits and costs of all forms of ecosystem services.

  • 36.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. European Forest Institute, North European Regional Office, SLU, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden; Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Mustonen, Mika
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), P.O. Box 18 (Jokiniemenkuja 1), FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Gong, Peichen
    Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden; European Forest Institute, North European Regional Office, SLU, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Increasing Forest Yield in Northern Europe: Countrywide Estimates and Economic Perspectives2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Woody biomass is the largest source of renewable energy in Europe and the expected increase in demand for wood was the stimulus for writing this paper. We discuss the economic effects of biophysical capacity limits in forest yield from a partial equilibrium perspective. Opportunities to increase the supply of forest biomass in the short- and long-term are discussed, as well as environmental side effects of intensive forest management. Focusing on northern Europe, national estimates of potential annual fellings and the corresponding potential amounts, simulated by the European Forest Information Scenario model (the EFISCEN model) are then presented, as well as reported fellings. For the region as a whole, there seems to be substantial unused biophysical potential, although recent data from some countries indicate underestimated annual felling rates. There is a need to discuss strategies to ensure that demand for wood resources in northern Europe can be accommodated without large price increases. However, using a larger proportion of the biophysical potential in northern Europe than at present will entail trade-offs with environmental and social values, which means that strategies are needed to protect and account for all the benefits of all forms of ecosystem services.

  • 37.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Parks, Peter
    Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Rutgers University.
    Boman, Mattias
    Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Integrated natural resource management in Northern Sweden: An application to forestry and reindeer husbandry2003In: Land Economics, ISSN 0023-7639, E-ISSN 1543-8325, Vol. 79, no 2, 149-159 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forests in northern Sweden are used for both timber production and reindeer grazing. Negative externalities and open access effects threaten the ability of the region to sustain economic benefits from these uses. A discrete time simulation for three municipalities in northern Sweden suggests that modifying forest harvest practices can enhance profits from reindeer production, with relatively low timber opportunity costs. Such efforts to sustain joint benefits from these boreal environments are more likely to be successful in combination with control of reindeer herd sizes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 38. Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Widmark, Camilla
    Andersson, Mats
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Measuring Transaction Costs for Pastoralists in Multiple Land Use Situations: Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Sweden2015In: Land Economics, ISSN 0023-7639, E-ISSN 1543-8325, Vol. 91, no 4, 704-722 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of transaction costs in multiple land use situations is helpful in policymaking and land use management, especially in natural resource management situations where interdependence prevails. By using reindeer herding forestry land use management as an example, the aim of this study is to analyze transaction costs among stakeholders in a comanagement situation. The results demonstrate that a key variable driving transaction costs is the presence of a "land use plan for reindeer husbandry," which is an interesting paradox as reindeer herders pursue the development of these land use plans even though this drives their transaction costs.

  • 39.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Zabel von Felten, Astrid
    Berner Fachhochschule.
    Ekvall, Hans
    SLU.
    Policies for Forest Landscape Management – A Conceptual Approach with an Empirical Application for Swedish Conditions.2017Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Brännlund, Runar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Reaching conflicting environmental goals: Balancing industrial and recreational use of forests. A review of empirical studies.2008In: CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Carlén, Ola
    et al.
    SLU.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Persson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Rekreationsfiske i Sverige 2013 Omfattning och värde.2016Report (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ekvall, Hans
    et al.
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Least-Cost Allocation of Measures to Increase the Amount of Coarse Woody Debris in Forest Estates2013In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, Vol. 19, no 3, 267-285 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is crucial for maintaining biodiversity in forests but conservation measures to increase CWD must be performed cost efficiently. We estimate least-cost combinations of CWD-increasing measures in a spruce-dominated Swedish forest estate. Specifically, we investigate how using combinations of the measures tree retention, creating high stumps, manual scarification, prolonged rotations, and retention of dying trees impacts the amount of CWD and net present value at the estate level. We found that by combining CWD-increasing measures in an optimal way the amount of CWD on the estate could be increased 322% with a decrease in present value of only 10%. The optimal combination of conservation measures depends on the desired increase in CWD. The analysis thus shows that huge improvements in cost-efficiency of biodiversity-oriented forestry are possible.

  • 43.
    Ekvall, Hans
    et al.
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Löfgren, Stefan
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Ash recycling: a method to improve forest production or to restore acidified surface waters?2014In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, Vol. 45, 42-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cost-benefit analysis compared different strategies for ash recycling in southern Swedish forests, with a special emphasis on the potential to use ash recycling as a measure to ameliorate acidification of soils and surface waters caused by acid deposition. Benefit transfer was used to estimate use values for sport fishing and non-use values in terms of existence values. The results show that the optimal share of acidified forest land that should be treated with ash depends on how optimistic one is about the effect of using ash to restore lakes and streams from acidification. More optimistic assumptions imply that the ash to larger extent should be used to ameliorate acidification. Using the most realistic assumption, given the experiences of forest liming, shows that acidified forest land should not be treated with ash with the aim of restoring lakes and streams from acidification. From a socioeconomic point of view, ash simply does more good as fertilizer on forested organic soils.

    (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 44.
    Ericsson, Göran
    et al.
    Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kindberg, Jonas
    Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Are wolves driving willingness to pay for large carnivores?: Wolves as a symbol for people’s willingness to pay for large carnivore conservation2008In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 21, no 4, 294-309 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A successful implementation of a mammalian conservation policy requires knowledge of how people value animals. Little is known about how people value large carnivores. The discussion is therefore dominated by people's perception of wolves. In a mail survey (65% response rate) we asked persons residing in areas with populations of wolves, bears, lynx, and wolverines whether they were willing to pay to reach the national conservation goals for those species. We compared 69 Swedish counties with a representative national sample of Swedes living outside the areas with large carnivores. We found that the behavioral intention willingness to pay (WTP) was negatively related to the presence of wolves, to the urban profile, and to opposition against the European Union Monetary Union. We encourage future studies to compare national surveys with local samples in controversial issues to discover conflicting views among national, regional, and local natural resource management stakeholders.

  • 45.
    Ericsson, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kindberg, Jonas
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Willingness to pay (WTP) for wolverine Gulo gulo conservation2007In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, Vol. 13, no Suppl. 2, 2-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about people’s willingness to pay (WTP) for conservation efforts is becoming increasingly important for natural resource management. We used a mail survey with four contacts to 11,418 people, aged 16-65, to investigate how much and why Swedes were willing to pay for wolverine Gulo gulo conservation. With the restricted distribution of European wolverines, Sweden has a key role in their management. We found that Swedes were least likely to support wolverine conservation efforts compared to wolves Canis lupus, lynx Lynx lynx and brown bears Ursus arctos. The amount varied between 965 and 1,233 SEK per person. Of the national representative control group, 47% expressed willingness to pay an average of 1,253 SEK per person. We found that in densely populated urban municipalities with a high proportion of university educated, high female-to-male ratio, positive attitude to the European monetary union (EMU), and a high income, people were more positive towards paying for wolverine conservation. The presence of wolves, but not the presence of any of the other large carnivores, was negatively related to peoples’ WTP for wolverine conservation. This indicates that the presence and related experience of wolves might be the principal driver of people’s perception of all large carnivores, including wolverines.

     

  • 46.
    Ericsson, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    The problem of spatial scale when studying human dimensions of a natural resource conflict: Human and wolves in Sweden2006In: The International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management, ISSN 1745-1590, Vol. 2, no 4, 343-349 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some surveys are performed at a spatial scale that hides the core of the problem. This is not a trivial problem if local members of the public and more distant respondents disagree over a certain issue. We contrast a Swedish national, proportional survey with corresponding regional and local surveys. We use three survey questions about wolves to illustrate the risk of extrapolation from proportional national surveys to areas where human and nature conservation issues are in conflict. As attitudes towards large carnivores generally tend to be favourable amongst the general public, but negative amongst those most likely to be adversely affected, surveys performed at a too large a spatial scale do not capture the problem or reveal disagreements between local and general public. This could lead to a conceptual mismatch between the spatial scales of, first, the natural resource problem and, second human population sampling. Our study in the mountain region of northern Sweden illustrates biases potentially introduced to controversial issues tied to local problems by using proportional national surveys. We suggest over-sampling in problem areas contrasted with proportional regional/national sampling, or proportional sampling matching the scale of problem, to identify the driving mechanisms and related variables.

  • 47.
    Geijer, Erik
    et al.
    Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics and Dept of Forest Economics Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jon
    Dept. of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden .
    Bostedt, Göran
    Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics and Dept of Forest Economics Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Dept. of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Is stump harvesting a remedy for the climate crisis or a curse for biodiversity?: An interdisciplinary study of conflicting goals2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dead wood is recognized as being one of the most important factors for forest biodiversity for many organism groups. One of the Swedish official environmental objectives is therefore to increase dead wood volume. However, reducing climate impact through increased use of forest biofuels is likely to work against this objective. The analysis is based on a regional economic forest sector model, focusing on northern Sweden, that includes suppliers and major users of roundwood and ecological results of stump harvest on forest biodiversity.

    The parameters of the model are estimated with a data set spanning 28 years. We simulate the effects of an increased demand for wood fuels in northern Sweden, with or without stump harvest. The two scenarios have different effects on all major roundwood markets in the region, as well as on biodiversity. More specifically, in our model, the scenario with stump harvest implies a 0.3 percent decrease in the emissions of greenhouse gases and a 4.12 percent reduction in overall population density of saproxylic beetles on each years future clear cuts. Thus, a clear goal conflict exists.

  • 48.
    Geijer, Erik
    et al.
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Andersson, Jon
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Safeguarding species richness vs. increasing the use of renewable energy: the effect of stump harvesting on two environmental goals2014In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, E-ISSN 1618-1530, Vol. 20, no 2, 111-125 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deadwood is recognized as one of the most important resources affecting forest biodiversity.Its absence from the forest landscape is, therefore, of concern, such that one official Swedishenvironmental objective is to increase the volume of deadwood. However, increasing the useof renewable energy sources, another environmental goal, is likely to work against thisbiodiversity objective. In this study we utilize a regional economic forest sector model,focusing on northern Sweden, in order to estimate the effect of a large scale introduction ofstump harvest on the future use of forest fuel. In addition, an ecological model, describing therelationship between the availability of dead wood and the abundance of saproxylic beetles, islinked to the economic model.The parameters used in the economic model are derived from a data set spanning 28 yearswhile the ecological model is derived from a survey of ten clear cuts, undertaken seven yearsafter the clear cutting, in order to investigate the abundance of saproxylic beetles in stumps.We simulate the effects of an increased demand for wood fuels in northern Sweden, with orwithout stump harvest. The two scenarios have different effects on all major round woodmarkets in the region, as well as on the abundance of saproxylic beetles. More specifically,the harvest of stumps is associated with a 5% reduction in the mean abundance of saproxylicbeetles living in deadwood on future clear cuts and a 3% increase in the use of renewableenergy recourses in heating plants.

  • 49.
    Geijer, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Damned if you do, damned if you do not: reduced climate impact vs. sustainable forests in Sweden2011In: Resources and Energy Economics, ISSN 0928-7655, Vol. 33, no 1, 94-106 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the potential goal conflict between two of Sweden's environmental objectives: Sustainable Forests and Reduced Climate Impact – or, more precisely, the conflict between forest conservation and the supply of wood fuel. To accomplish this, we use a forest sector model that includes the suppliers and major users of roundwood. The econometric results, based on a data set that spans 40 years, show that all the own price elasticities have the expected signs. Among the three forestry products, the supply and (long-term) demand of forest fuel seems to be most sensitive to a price change. In a second step, the estimated model is used to simulate the effect of increased forest conservation – the Sustainable Forest objective – on the supply of wood fuel. If oil is used as a substitute, Swedish emissions of greenhouse gases will increase by almost 0.92 percent, which indicates a clear conflict with the Reduced Climate Impact objective.

  • 50.
    Holgén, Per
    et al.
    Department of Silviculture, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bostedt, Göran
    Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Should planting of broadleaved species be encouraged at the expense of Norway spruce?: An economic approach to a current Southern Swedish forestry issue2004In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, Vol. 10, no 3, 123-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-timber values of the forest have been subject to much attention in Sweden during the last decades. Of special interest in this respect are the diminishing and species rich broad-leaved forests in southern Sweden. During the late 1900s many of these forests were converted to monocultures of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) and other conifers at a high and accelerating pace. While the consequences of this change on biodiversity are currently studied on a broad scale, recreational values, although recognized, have only been subject to a limited number of scientific studies.

    In the current study, we focused on timber values and recreational values of coniferous and broad-leaved forests in southern Sweden. The first objective was to model the timber value of different management alternatives including spruce or beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) at a typical southern Swedish forest site. The site expectation value for spruce was considerably higher than for beech. The second objective was to include recreational values in monetary terms in the model. The estimated required level of marginal willingness-to-pay for an increase in the area of beech forest in the county of Skåne was very low, indicating that regeneration of beech may be superior to spruce from a socio-economic point of view.

12 1 - 50 of 65
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