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  • 1. Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Jones, Jeremy B.
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    Chapin, F. Stuart, III
    Bowden, William B.
    Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia
    Epstein, Howard E.
    Flannigan, Michael D.
    Harms, Tamara K.
    Hollingsworth, Teresa N.
    Mack, Michelle C.
    McGuire, A. David
    Natali, Susan M.
    Rocha, Adrian V.
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Vonk, Jorien E.
    Wickland, Kimberly P.
    Aiken, George R.
    Alexander, Heather D.
    Amon, Rainer M. W.
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Bergeron, Yves
    Bishop, Kevin
    Blarquez, Olivier
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Breen, Amy L.
    Buffam, Ishi
    Cai, Yihua
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Carey, Sean K.
    Chen, Jing M.
    Chen, Han Y. H.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Cooper, Lee W.
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    de Groot, William J.
    DeLuca, Thomas H.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Fetcher, Ned
    Finlay, Jacques C.
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    French, Nancy H. F.
    Gauthier, Sylvie
    Girardin, Martin P.
    Goetz, Scott J.
    Goldammer, Johann G.
    Gough, Laura
    Grogan, Paul
    Guo, Laodong
    Higuera, Philip E.
    Hinzman, Larry
    Hu, Feng Sheng
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Jafarov, Elchin E.
    Jandt, Randi
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kasischke, Eric S.
    Kattner, Gerhard
    Kelly, Ryan
    Keuper, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kling, George W.
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Kouki, Jari
    Kuhry, Peter
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Laurion, Isabelle
    Macdonald, Robie W.
    Mann, Paul J.
    Martikainen, Pertti J.
    McClelland, James W.
    Molau, Ulf
    Oberbauer, Steven F.
    Olefeldt, David
    Pare, David
    Parisien, Marc-Andre
    Payette, Serge
    Peng, Changhui
    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.
    Rastetter, Edward B.
    Raymond, Peter A.
    Raynolds, Martha K.
    Rein, Guillermo
    Reynolds, James F.
    Robards, Martin
    Rogers, Brendan M.
    Schaedel, Christina
    Schaefer, Kevin
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Sky, Jasper
    Spencer, Robert G. M.
    Starr, Gregory
    Striegl, Robert G.
    Teisserenc, Roman
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Virtanen, Tarmo
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    Zimov, Sergei
    Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment2016In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 11, no 3, 034014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and boreal biomass; however, the lack of robust estimates of net carbon balance increases the risk of further overshooting international emissions targets. Precise empirical or model-based assessments of the critical factors driving carbon balance are unlikely in the near future, so to address this gap, we present estimates from 98 permafrost-region experts of the response of biomass, wildfire, and hydrologic carbon flux to climate change. Results suggest that contrary to model projections, total permafrost-region biomass could decrease due to water stress and disturbance, factors that are not adequately incorporated in current models. Assessments indicate that end-of-the-century organic carbon release from Arctic rivers and collapsing coastlines could increase by 75% while carbon loss via burning could increase four-fold. Experts identified water balance, shifts in vegetation community, and permafrost degradation as the key sources of uncertainty in predicting future system response. In combination with previous findings, results suggest the permafrost region will become a carbon source to the atmosphere by 2100 regardless of warming scenario but that 65%-85% of permafrost carbon release can still be avoided if human emissions are actively reduced.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Jurgensone, Iveta
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Simonelli, Paolo
    Bignert, Anders
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Can Humic Water Discharge Counteract Eutrophication in Coastal Waters?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, e61293- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common and established view is that increased inputs of nutrients to the sea, for example via river flooding, will cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms in coastal areas. We here show that this concept may be questioned in certain scenarios. Climate change has been predicted to cause increased inflow of freshwater to coastal areas in northern Europe. River waters in these areas are often brown from the presence of high concentrations of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon ( humic carbon), in addition to nitrogen and phosphorus. In this study we investigated whether increased inputs of humic carbon can change the structure and production of the pelagic food web in the recipient seawater. In a mesocosm experiment unfiltered seawater from the northern Baltic Sea was fertilized with inorganic nutrients and humic carbon (CNP), and only with inorganic nutrients (NP). The system responded differently to the humic carbon addition. In NP treatments bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton production increased and the systems turned net autotrophic, whereas the CNP-treatment only bacterial and zooplankton production increased driving the system to net heterotrophy. The size-structure of the food web showed large variations in the different treatments. In the enriched NP treatments the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous >20 mu m algae, while in the CNP treatments the phytoplankton was dominated by picocyanobacteria <5 mu m. Our results suggest that climate change scenarios, resulting in increased humic-rich river inflow, may counteract eutrophication in coastal waters, leading to a promotion of the microbial food web and other heterotrophic organisms, driving the recipient coastal waters to net-heterotrophy.

  • 3.
    Ask, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Net ecosystem production in clear-water and brown-water lakes2012In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 26, GB1017- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied 15 lakes in northern Sweden with respect to primary production and respiration in benthic and pelagic habitats. The lakes were characterized by different concentrations of colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of terrestrial origin, forming a gradient ranging from clear-water to brown-water lakes. Primary production decreased and respiration increased on a whole-lake scale along the gradient of increasing DOC. Thus, the lakes became more net heterotrophic, i.e., had lower net ecosystem production (NEP = gross primary production - community respiration), with increasing terrestrial DOC and this change coincided with increasing partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) in the surface waters. The single most important process for the increasing net heterotrophy along the DOC gradient was pelagic respiration of terrestrial organic carbon. In spite of high metabolic activity in the benthic habitat, benthic primary production and benthic respiration decreased simultaneously with increasing DOC, showing that the benthic habitat was in metabolic balance throughout the gradient. Therefore, the net heterotrophic states of the lakes depended on the terrestrial DOC export to lakes and the concomitant respiration of terrestrial organic carbon in the pelagic habitat.

  • 4.
    Ask, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Terrestrial organic matter and light penetration: Effects on bacterial and primary production in lakes2009In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 54, no 6, 2034-2040 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated productivity at the basal trophic level in 15 unproductive lakes in a gradient ranging from clear-water to brown-water (humic) lakes in northern Sweden. Primary production and bacterial production in benthic and pelagic habitats were measured to estimate the variation in energy mobilization from external energy sources (primary production plus bacterial production on allochthonous organic carbon) along the gradient. Clear-water lakes were dominated by autotrophic energy mobilization in the benthic habitat, whereas humic lakes were dominated by heterotrophic energy mobilization in the pelagic habitat. Whole-lake (benthic + pelagic) energy mobilization was negatively correlated to the light-extinction coefficient, which was determined by colored terrestrial organic matter in the lake water. Thus, variation in the concentration of terrestrial organic matter and its light-absorbing characteristics exerts strong control on the magnitude, as well as on the processes and pathways, of energy mobilization in unproductive lakes. We suggest that unproductive lakes in general are sensitive to input of terrestrial organic matter because of its effects on basal energy mobilization in both benthic and pelagic habitats.

  • 5.
    Ask, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Whole-lake estimates of carbon flux through algae and bacteria in benthic and pelagic habitats of clear-water lakes2009In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 90, no 7, 1923-1932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study quantified new biomass production of algae and bacteria in both benthic and pelagic habitats of clear-water lakes to contrast how carbon from the atmosphere and terrestrial sources regulates whole-lake metabolism. We studied four small unproductive lakes in subarctic northern Sweden during one summer season. The production of new biomass in both benthic and pelagic habitats was calculated as the sum of autotrophic production by algae and heterotrophic production by bacteria using allochthonous organic carbon (OC). Whole-lake production of new biomass was dominated by the benthic habitat (86% +/- 4% [mean +/- SD]) and by primary production (77% +/- 9%). Still, heterotrophic bacteria fueled by allochthonous OC constituted a significant portion of the new biomass production in both benthic (19% +/- 11%) and pelagic habitats (51% +/- 24%). In addition, overall net production (primary production minus respiration) was close to zero in the benthic habitats but highly negative (-163 +/- 81 mg C.m(-2).d(-1)) in pelagic regions of all lakes. We conclude (1) that allochthonous OC supported a significant part of total production of new biomass in both pelagic and benthic habitats, (2) that benthic habitats dominated the whole-lake production of new biomass, and (3) that respiration and net CO2 production dominated the carbon flux of the pelagic habitats and biomass production dominated the benthic carbon flux. Taken together, these findings suggest that previous investigations have greatly underestimated the productivity of clear-water lakes when benthic autotrophic production and metabolism of allochthonous OC have not been measured.

  • 6.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Competition mediated coexistence of invading intermediate consumer, ninespine stickleback, and a resident omnivorous top predator, Arctic charManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change results in changes in the geographical distribution of species. Species invasion success into a new area is dependent both on the dispersal ability of species as well as the strength and identity of biotic interactions between resident and invading species. Coexistence in intraguild predation (IGP) systems depends on the relative strength of predation and competition interactions which in turn are temperature dependent. We investigated the effects of introducing an intermediate consumer, ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), into allopatric populations of the omnivorous top predator Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Introductions were performed in lakes with different climate regimes, two tundra lakes and two forest lakes that differed in average summer temperatures with 1.4 ± 0.5 ºC (average ± 1SD). We found that sticklebacks were able to invade and increase in density in both tundra and forest lakes. Sticklebacks had strong negative effects on resource densities which also was reflected in a decreased growth of small char. Increasing stickleback density had a positive effect on growth of large adults and on the maximum size of char. We conclude that stickleback presence is not limited by biological interactions in these systems but rather by dispersion ability. We suggest that the size dependency in the response of char to the invasion of sticklebacks is fundamental for the successful invasion of sticklebacks, and that size dependent interactions including cannibalism play important roles for coexistence in natural IGP-systems.

  • 7.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Temperature mediated effects on top consumer populations in subarctic lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of temperature on top consumer populations in subarctic lake communities were studied by contrasting two lake pairs in different climate regimes: one pair on the low alpine tundra and one pair in the subalpine birch forest. We measured zooplankton and macroinvertebrate biomasses over the season and estimated population density and size structure of the top consumer Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Furthermore, we modelled char growth using literature data on temperature dependent search rate, handling time and metabolic demands. The forest lakes were warmer than the tundra lakes. Char in the forest lakes were larger and had a higher individual growth compared to char in the tundra lakes, while population density and biomasses of char were not different between the forest and the tundra lakes. There were no differences in macroinvertebrate and zooplankton resource levels available for char between lake pairs. Our modeling of char growth revealed that higher temperature increased growth of char at the observed resource densities, suggesting that the higher temperature in the forest lakes was primarily the cause of the higher growth of char in these lakes. We suggest that cannibalism in char may regulate char recruitment and thereby population density and biomass of char leading to effects of increasing temperature on consumer biomass and consumer individual growth different from what is expected in pure consumer-resource systems. Our results emphasize the importance of feedbacks within ecosystems when addressing effects of climate change and increasing temperature on lake communities.

  • 8.
    Bartels, Pia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Cucherousset, Julien
    Gudasz, Cristian
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Premke, Katrin
    Rubach, Anja
    Steger, Kristin
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Eklov, Peter
    Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach2012In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 168, no 3, 807-818 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy are ubiquitous. Aquatic ecosystems typically receive material that also includes organic matter from the surrounding catchment. Terrestrial-derived (allochthonous) organic matter can enter aquatic ecosystems in dissolved or particulate form. Several studies have highlighted the importance of dissolved organic carbon to aquatic consumers, but less is known about allochthonous particulate organic carbon (POC). Similarly, most studies showing the effects of allochthonous organic carbon (OC) on aquatic consumers have investigated pelagic habitats; the effects of allochthonous OC on benthic communities are less well studied. Allochthonous inputs might further decrease primary production through light reduction, thereby potentially affecting autotrophic resource availability to consumers. Here, an enclosure experiment was carried out to test the importance of POC input and light availability on the resource use in a benthic food web of a clear-water lake. Corn starch (a C-4 plant) was used as a POC source due to its insoluble nature and its distinct carbon stable isotope value (delta C-13). The starch carbon was closely dispersed over the bottom of the enclosures to study the fate of a POC source exclusively available to sediment biota. The addition of starch carbon resulted in a clear shift in the isotopic signature of surface-dwelling herbivorous and predatory invertebrates. Although the starch carbon was added solely to the sediment surface, the carbon originating from the starch reached zooplankton. We suggest that allochthonous POC can subsidize benthic food webs directly and can be further transferred to pelagic systems, thereby highlighting the importance of benthic pathways for pelagic habitats.

  • 9. Berggren, Martin
    et al.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Intraspecific Autochthonous and Allochthonous Resource Use by Zooplankton in a Humic Lake during the Transitions between Winter, Summer and Fall2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, e0120575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal patterns in assimilation of externally produced, allochthonous, organic matter into aquatic food webs are poorly understood, especially in brown-water lakes. We studied the allochthony (share biomass of terrestrial origin) in cladoceran, calanoid and cyclopoid micro-crustacean zooplankton from late winter to fall during two years in a small humic lake (Sweden). The use of allochthonous resources was important for sustaining a small population of calanoids in the water column during late winter. However, in summer the calanoids shifted to 100% herbivory, increasing their biomass several-fold by making efficient use of the pelagic primary production. In contrast, the cyclopoids and cladocerans remained at high levels of allochthony throughout the seasons, both groups showing the mean allochthony of 0.56 (range in mean 0.17-0.79 and 0.34-0.75, for the respective group, depending on model parameters). Our study shows that terrestrial organic matter can be an important resource for cyclopoids and cladocerans on an annual basis, forming a significant link between terrestrial organic matter and the higher trophic levels of the food web, but it can also be important for sustaining otherwise herbivorous calanoids during periods of low primary production in late winter.

  • 10.
    Berggren, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ström, L
    Laudon, H
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lake secondary production fueled by rapid transfer of low molecular weight organic carbon from terrestrial sources to aquatic consumers2010In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 13, no 7, 870-880 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecology Letters (2010) Abstract Carbon of terrestrial origin often makes up a significant share of consumer biomass in unproductive lake ecosystems. However, the mechanisms for terrestrial support of lake secondary production are largely unclear. By using a modelling approach, we show that terrestrial export of dissolved labile low molecular weight carbon (LMWC) compounds supported 80% (34-95%), 54% (19-90%) and 23% (7-45%) of the secondary production by bacteria, protozoa and metazoa, respectively, in a 7-km(2) boreal lake (conservative to liberal estimates in brackets). Bacterial growth on LMWC was of similar magnitude as that of primary production (PP), and grazing on bacteria effectively channelled the LMWC carbon to higher trophic levels. We suggest that rapid turnover of forest LMWC pools enables continuous export of fresh photosynthates and other labile metabolites to aquatic systems, and that substantial transfer of LMWC from terrestrial sources to lake consumers can occur within a few days. Sequestration of LMWC of terrestrial origin, thus, helps explain high shares of terrestrial carbon in lake organisms and implies that lake food webs can be closely dependent on recent terrestrial PP.

  • 11.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Faithfull Mathisen, Carolyn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nitrogen deposition and warming  – effects on phytoplankton nutrient limitation in subarctic lakes2013In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 19, no 8, 2557-2568 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to predict the combined effects of enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition and warming on phytoplankton development in high latitude and mountain lakes. Consequently, we assessed, in a series of enclosureexperiments, how lake water nutrient stoichiometry and phytoplankton nutrient limitation varied over the growingseason in 11 lakes situated along an altitudinal/climate gradient with low N-deposition (<1 kg N ha1yr1) in northern subarctic Sweden. Short-term bioassay experiments with N- and P-additions revealed that phytoplankton inhigh-alpine lakes were more prone to P-limitation, and with decreasing altitude became increasingly N- andNP-colimited. Nutrient limitation was additionally most obvious in midsummer. There was also a strong positivecorrelation between phytoplankton growth and water temperature in the bioassays. Although excess nutrients wereavailable in spring and autumn, on these occasions growth was likely constrained by low water temperatures. Theseresults imply that enhanced N-deposition over the Swedish mountain areas will, with the exception of high-alpinelakes, enhance biomass and drive phytoplankton from N- to P-limitation. However, if not accompanied by warming,N-input from deposition will stimulate limited phytoplankton growth due to low water temperatures during largeparts of the growing season. Direct effects of warming, allowing increased metabolic rates and an extension of thegrowing season, seem equally crucial to synergistically enhance phytoplankton development in these lakes.

  • 12.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vrede, Tobias
    N-limited consumer growth and low nutrient regeneration N:P ratios in lakes with low N deposition2015In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 6, no 1, 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient limitation of primary producers and their consumers can have a large influence on ecosystem productivity. The nature and strength of nutrient limitation is driven both by external factors (e.g., nutrient loading) and internal processes (e.g., consumer-driven nutrient regeneration). Here we present results from a field study in 10 low productive headwater lakes in northern subarctic Sweden, where nitrogen (N) deposition is low and phytoplankton is primarily N-limited. We assessed the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of seston and zooplankton and estimated the N:P ratio of consumer-driven nutrient regeneration. Based on stoichiometric models, the estimated elemental imbalances between seston and zooplankton suggest that zooplankton were mainly N-limited and regenerated nutrients with low N:P ratios (median 11.9, atomic ratio). The predicted N:P regeneration ratios were consistent with results from phytoplankton nutrient limitation bioassays in mid-summer, i.e., the N:P regeneration was predicted to be low when phytoplankton were N-limited, and high when phytoplankton were P-limited. During other seasons, when water discharge was high, nutrient loading from the surrounding catchments apparently had the strongest effect on phytoplankton nutrient limitation. We propose that lakes with higher N:P ratios than the open ocean is an effect of N deposition, that N-limitation of consumers and phytoplankton is further enhanced by low nutrient regeneration N:P ratios, and that in the absence of N deposition, lake and ocean N:P stoichiometry are similar.

  • 13.
    Byström, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hedström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hotchkiss, Erin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rodríguez, Patricia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Austral Centre for Scientific Research (CADIC-CONICET), 9410 Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
    Vasconcelos, Rivera Francisco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Warming decrease fish population densities and biomassManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Temperature impact all biota and ecosystems through its direct effect on the vital rates of primary producers and consumers. Still, how these changes in rates translates through ecosystem feed backs to the population level of top consumers are poorly understood. Here, we studied effects of temperature increase (+ 3 ̊C during ice free season) on fish population dynamics in a replicated large scale pond ecosystem experiment over 3 years. Increased temperature had no significant effect on whole ecosystem gross primary production while top down effects of warming on intermediate consumers changed from negative to positive due to negative effects of warming on fish population abundance. Total fish density and biomass and abundance of both mature and old fish decreased with warming, while proportion of young fish increased, with warming. The effects of warming on fish population demographics were likely due to that temperature increased cohort competition and fish energy requirements relative to resource production. Our results suggest that global warming may increase competition, favor young individuals and overall decrease fish population densities and biomass. 

  • 14.
    Byström, Pär
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Van Kooten, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Olofsson, Frans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Substitution of top predators: effects of pike invasion in a subarctic lake2007In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 52, no 7, 1271–1280- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Invasions of top predators may have strong cascading effects in ecosystems affecting both prey species abundance and lower trophic levels. A recently discussed factor that may enhance species invasion is climate change and in this context, we studied the effects of an invasion of northern pike into a subarctic lake ecosystem formerly inhabited by the native top predator Arctic char and its prey fish, ninespined stickleback.

    2. Our study demonstrated a strong change in fish community composition from a system with Arctic char as top predator and high densities of sticklebacks to a system with northern pike as top predator and very low densities of sticklebacks. A combination of both predation and competition from pike is the likely cause of the extinction of char.

    3. The change in top predator species also cascaded down to primary consumers as both zooplankton and predator-sensitive macroinvertebrates increased in abundance.

    4. Although the pike invasion coincided with increasing summer temperatures in the study area we have no conclusive evidence that the temperature increase is the causal mechanism behind the pike invasion. But still, our study provides possible effects of future pike invasions in mountain lakes related to climate change. We suggest that future pike invasions will have strong effects in lake ecosystems, both by replacing native top consumers and through cascading effects on lower trophic levels.

  • 15.
    Deininger, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Faithfull, Carolyn L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Oceanography, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, USA.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaus, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pelagic food web response to whole lake N fertilization2017In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 62, no 4, 1498-1511 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic activities are increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) loadings to unproductive boreal lakes. In many of these lakes phytoplankton are N limited, consequently N fertilization may affect ecosystem productivity and consumer resource use. Here, we conducted whole lake inorganic N fertilization experiments with six small N limited unproductive boreal lakes (three control and three N enriched) in an area receiving low N deposition with one reference and two impact years. Our aim was to assess the effects of N fertilization on pelagic biomass production and consumer resource use. We found that phytoplankton primary production (PP) and biomass, and the PP: bacterioplankton production ratio increased after fertilization. As expected, the relative contribution of phytoplankton derived resources (autochthony) that supported the crustacean zooplankton community increased. Yet, the response in the consumer community was modest with autochthony only increasing in one of the three major zooplankton groups and with no effect on zooplankton biomass. In conclusion, our findings imply that newly available phytoplankton energy derived from N fertilization was not efficiently transferred up to zooplankton, indicating a mismatch between producer energy supply and consumer energy use with potential accumulation of phytoplankton biomass as the result.

  • 16.
    Diehl, Sebastian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Thomsson, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wickman, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Vasconcelos, Francisco R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Uszko, Wojciech
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Resource and consumer control of cross-habitat trophic interactions in shallow lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17. Eiler, Alexander
    et al.
    Beier, Sara
    Säwström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    High ratio of bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis genes to chlorophyll biosynthesis genes in bacteria of humic lakes2009In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 75, no 22, 7221-7228 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies highlight the diversity and significance of marine phototrophic microorganisms such as picocyanobacteria, phototrophic picoeukaryotes, and bacteriochlorophyll- and rhodopsin-holding phototrophic bacteria. To assess if freshwater ecosystems also harbor similar phototroph diversity, genes involved in the biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll and chlorophyll were targeted to explore oxygenic and aerobic anoxygenic phototroph composition in a wide range of lakes. Partial dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (DPOR) and chlorophyllide oxidoreductase (COR) genes in bacteria of seven lakes with contrasting trophic statuses were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Out of 61 sequences encoding the L subunit of DPOR (L-DPOR), 22 clustered with aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, whereas 39 L-DPOR sequences related to oxygenic phototrophs, like cyanobacteria, were observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clear separation of these freshwater L-DPOR genes as well as 11 COR gene sequences from their marine counterparts. Terminal restriction fragment length analysis of L-DPOR genes was used to characterize oxygenic aerobic and anoxygenic photosynthesizing populations in 20 lakes differing in physical and chemical characteristics. Significant differences in L-DPOR community composition were observed between dystrophic lakes and all other systems, where a higher proportion of genes affiliated with aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was observed than in other systems. Our results reveal a significant diversity of phototrophic microorganisms in lakes and suggest niche partitioning of oxygenic and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in these systems in response to trophic status and coupled differences in light regime.

  • 18.
    Faithfull, Carolyn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Huss, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vrede, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergstrom, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Transfer of bacterial production based on labile carbon to higher trophic levels in an oligotrophic pelagic system2012In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 69, no 1, 85-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additions of labile organic carbon (C) enhanced bacterial production (BP) and were associated with increases in crustacean zooplankton and planktivorous fish biomasses. This was shown in a mesocosm experiment where we traced the contribution of BP to zooplankton and fish using stable isotopes and labile glucose-C as a biomarker. BP increased with glucose-C addition, and all zooplankton and fish incorporated some glucose-C. However, the effect of labile-C addition on zooplankton was taxa-dependant, as although cladocerans incorporated the most labile-C, increased BP did not affect cladoceran biomass. Instead, calanoid copepod biomass increased with glucose addition. This suggests that the ability to selectively graze on high quality food, such as bacterial grazing protists capable of trophic upgrading, had a stronger positive effect on calanoid copepods biomass than unselective grazing on bacteria and protists had on cladoceran biomass. Higher BP was associated with increased survival and population growth of young-of-the-year perch (Perca fluviatilis) when stocked at high densities, which suggested that BP had a density-dependant positive effect on fish growth.

  • 19.
    Faithfull, Carolyn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Huss, Magnus
    Vrede, Tobias
    Institutionen för vatten och miljö, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Transfer of bacterial production based on labile carbon to higher trophic levels in an oligotrophic pelagic systemManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is debatable whether bacterial production (BP) based on labile carbon (C) is an important energy subsidy for higher trophic levels in the pelagic zone of lakes. Increased BP may reduce phytoplankton and basal production through competition for phosphorus. However, enhanced BP can also be regarded  as an additional basal food resource used directly by unselective filter feeding (cladocerans) or indirectly through grazing on the microbial food web (cladocerans and copepods). In a mesocosm experiment we traced the contribution of BP to crustacean zooplankton and planktivorous fish using stable isotopes and labile glucose-C as a biomarker. BP increased with glucose-C addition and all zooplankton and fish incorporated some glucose-C. Although cladocerans incorporated the most glucose-C, increased BP did not affect cladoceran biomass. Instead, calanoid copepod biomass increased with glucose addition. This suggests that the ability to select high quality food such as bacterial grazing protists capable of trophic upgrading (i.e. de novo synthesis of fatty acids), had a stronger positive effect on calanoids, than unselective grazing on bacteria and protists had on cladoceran biomass. Higher BP was associated with increased survival and population growth of young-of-the-year perch when stocked at high densities, which suggested that BP had a density dependant effect on fish growth. Although the total amount of energy mobilized did not affect fish growth, energy mobilized through the microbial food chain increased calanoid copepod biomass; the favored prey species of planktivorous fish in this system.

  • 20.
    Giesler, Reiner
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lyon, S. W.
    Morth, C-M
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, E. M.
    Jantze, E. J.
    Destouni, G.
    Humborg, C.
    Catchment-scale dissolved carbon concentrations and export estimates across six subarctic streams in northern Sweden2014In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 11, no 2, 525-537 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climatic change is currently enhancing permafrost thawing and the flow of water through the landscape in subarctic and arctic catchments, with major consequences for the carbon export to aquatic ecosystems. We studied stream water carbon export in several tundra-dominated catchments in northern Sweden. There were clear seasonal differences in both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations. The highest DOC concentrations occurred during the spring freshet while the highest DIC concentrations were always observed during winter baseflow conditions for the six catchments considered in this study. Long-term trends for the period 1982 to 2010 for one of the streams showed that DIC concentrations has increased by 9% during the 28 yr of measurement while no clear trend was found for DOC. Similar increasing trends were also found for conductivity, Ca and Mg. When trends were discretized into individual months, we found a significant linear increase in DIC concentrations with time for September, November and December. In these subarctic catchments, the annual mass of C exported as DIC was in the same order of magnitude as DOC; the average proportion of DIC to the total dissolved C exported was 61% for the six streams. Furthermore, there was a direct relationship between total runoff and annual dissolved carbon fluxes for these six catchments. These relationships were more prevalent for annual DIC exports than annual DOC exports in this region. Our results also highlight that both DOC and DIC can be important in high-latitude ecosystems. This is particularly relevant in environments where thawing permafrost and changes to subsurface ice due to global warming can influence stream water fluxes of C. The large proportion of stream water DIC flux also has implications on regional C budgets and needs to be considered in order to understand climate-induced feedback mechanisms across the landscape.

  • 21.
    Giesler, Reiner
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Morth, Carl-Magnus
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lundin, Erik J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Spatiotemporal variations of pCO(2) and delta C-13-DIC in subarctic streams in northern Sweden2013In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 27, no 1, 176-186 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current predictions of climate-related changes in high-latitude environments suggest major effects on the C export in streams and rivers. To what extent this will also affect the stream water CO2 concentrations is poorly understood. In this study we examined the spatiotemporal variation in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) and in stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (delta C-13-DIC) in subarctic streams in northern Sweden. The selected watersheds are characterized by large variations in high-latitude boreal forest and tundra and differences in bedrock. We found that all streams generally were supersaturated in pCO(2) with an average concentration of 850 mu atm. The variability in pCO(2) across streams was poorly related to vegetation cover, and carbonaceous bedrock influence was manifested in high DIC concentrations but not reflected in either stream pCO(2) or delta C-13-DIC. Stream water pCO(2) values were highest during winter base flow when we also observed the lowest delta C-13-DIC values, and this pattern is interpreted as a high contribution from CO2 from soil respiration. Summer base flow delta C-13-DIC values probably are more affected by in situ stream processes such as aquatic production/respiration and degassing. A challenge for further studies will be to disentangle the origin of stream water CO2 and quantify their relative importance.

  • 22.
    Hedström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bystedt, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bokma, Folmer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brownification increases winter mortality in fish2017In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 183, no 2, 587-595 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In northernclimateswinter is a bottleneck for many organisms. Low light and resource availability constrain individual foraging rates,potentially leading tostarvation and increasedmortality.Increasinginput of humic substances to aquatic ecosystems causesbrownification of water and hence a further decreaseof light availability,which may lead tofurther decreased foraging ratesand starvation mortality during winter.To test this hypothesis, we measured the effectsof experimentally increased humicwaterinput on consumption and survival of young-of-the-year (YOY) three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) over winterin largeoutdoor enclosures. Population densitieswereestimated in autumn andthefollowing springand food availabilityand consumptionwere monitoredoverwinter. As hypothesized,mortality washigher underhumic(76%)as compared to ambientconditions (64%).Also, body condition and ingested prey biomass werelower under humic conditionseven thoughresource availability wasnotlower under humic conditions. Light conditions were significantly poorer under humic conditions. This suggeststhat increased mortality and decreased body condition and ingested prey biomasswasnot due to decreased resource availability but due todecreasedsearch efficiencyin this visual feeding consumer. Increased future brownification of aquatic systems may therefore negatively affect both recruitment and densities of fish.

  • 23.
    Hedström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rodríguez, Patricia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Austral Centre for Scientific Research (CADIC-CONICET), 9410 Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vasconcelos, Rivera Francisco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Population and size dependent responses in fish production to climate changeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is predicted to increase water temperatures and export of terrestrial dissolved matter (TDOM) to aquatic ecosystems with concomitant effects on ecosystem productivity and production of consumers at the top of the food web. Here we study how increased level of TDOM and temperature alone or in combination affect benthic and pelagic primary production and biomass production of fish in replicated large scale outdoor pond experiment. We increased temperature (+3 ̊C) and TDOM concentrations (×2.5) using natural high TDOM water from a small creek and used naturally reproducing three-spine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations as model fish species. Gross primary production (GPP) was similar to ambient control conditions in all treatments although increased TDOM concentrations deceased benthic but stimulated pelagic GPP, presumably as a result of decreased light availability and increased nutrient availability, respectively. The production of young-of-the-year (YOY), older, and total fish population were negatively affected by warming, whereas increased TDOM caused decreased YOY and total fish production. Effect of temperature on fish production were likely a result of increased metabolic cost in relation to resource production and intake rates whereas the negative effect of TDOM on fish production was likely a result of decreasing benthic resource production. However, the combined effect on fish production of warming and TDOM was only intermediate compared to individual treatments. Our study suggest climate change will lead to decreased fish production and that the effect may be most pronounced in clear systems dominated by benthic GPP . 

  • 24.
    Hedström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rodríguez, Patricia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Austral Centre for Scientific Research (CADIC-CONICET), 9410 Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vasconcelos, Rivera Francisco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Warming but not increased terrestrial doc has negative effects on fish recruitmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water temperature and export of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to recipient aquatic ecosystems have strong impacts on ecosystem productivity. Increased DOC concentration causing brownification of water is argued to reduce fish production by decreasing light availability for autotrophic production. On the other hand, higher temperatures have been shown to correlate positively with fish recruitment. This increase has been related to increased growth rates and survival of young-of-the-year (YOY) fish with warming. However, whether or not increased temperature results in higher growth depends on resource availability, suggesting a relationship between individual gain and recruitment mediated via the interplay between resource production and temperature. In a replicated, large scale experimental pond ecosystem, we tested the effects of increased temperature (+3oC) and terrestrial DOC concentrations (+4 mg/l) on recruitment (size, density and biomass) of three-spined sticklebacks over one growth season. Gross primary production (GPP) was similar between treatments, whereas zooplankton and benthic invertebrate biomass were negatively affected by increased temperature and if any higher at increased DOC levels. Increased temperature had no effect on individual size but negative effects on body condition and recruitment of YOY sticklebacks, while increased DOC concentration had no effect on recruitment. No positive effect of temperature increase on GPP and decreased resource levels in combination with higher metabolic costs, are suggested to increase starvation mortality and to be the main mechanism behind observed negative effects of warming on recruitment. Based on our results, we suggest that climate change may, counter intuitively, have negative effects on fish recruitment due to decreased carrying capacity of nursery habitats as a consequence of increased energy requirements in juvenile fish in relation to the net effects on resource production and ecosystem productivity. 

  • 25.
    Hotchkiss, E. R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hall, R. O., Jr.
    Sponseller, R. A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Butman, D.
    Klaminder, J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Laudon, H.
    Rosvall, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Karlsson, J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sources of and processes controlling CO2 emissions change with the size of streams and rivers2015In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 8, no 9, 696-699 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) evasion from streams and rivers to the atmosphere represents a substantial flux in the global carbon cycle(1-3). The proportions of CO2 emitted from streams and rivers that come from terrestrially derived CO2 or from CO2 produced within freshwater ecosystems through aquatic metabolism are not well quantified. Here we estimated CO2 emissions from running waters in the contiguous United States, based on freshwater chemical and physical characteristics and modelled gas transfer velocities at 1463 United States Geological Survey monitoring sites. We then assessed CO2 production from aquatic metabolism, compiled from previously published measurements of net ecosystem production from 187 streams and rivers across the contiguous United States. We find that CO2 produced by aquatic metabolism contributes about 28% of CO2 evasion from streams and rivers with flows between 0.0001 and 19,000 m(3) s(-1). We mathematically modelled CO2 flux from groundwater into running waters along a stream-river continuum to evaluate the relationship between stream size and CO2 source. Terrestrially derived CO2 dominates emissions from small streams, and the percentage of CO2 emissions from aquatic metabolism increases with stream size. We suggest that the relative role of rivers as conduits for terrestrial CO2 efflux and as reactors mineralizing terrestrial organic carbon is a function of their size and connectivity with landscapes.

  • 26. Hylander S, S
    et al.
    Boeing, WJ
    Granéli, W
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    von Einem, J
    Gutseit, K
    Hansson, L-H
    Complementary UV protective compounds in zooplankton2009In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 54, 1883-1893 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zooplankton accumulate several groups of photoprotective compounds to shield against damaging ultraviolet radiation (UV). One of these groups, the carotenoids, makes the animals more conspicuous to visually hunting predators, whereas others, such as the mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) may not. The blend of photoprotective compounds is therefore important for the UV defense but also for the ability to escape predation through crypsis. Here we assess laboratory and field data from different latitudes to examine how UV, predation threat, and pigment availability (in food) affects the mixture of UV-protective compounds in copepods. Overall, the blend of MAAs and carotenoids was partly explained by the availability of MAAs in the food, the UV-threat, and the presence of predators. Copepods upregulated their MAA content when UV threat was increasing (i.e., if MAAs were abundant in food), and in field data this accumulation only occurred at high levels of predation threat. If MAAs were scarce, copepods instead compensated with higher carotenoid accumulation. However, when there was a high predation threat this carotenoid compensatory effect was disadvantageous, and low concentrations of both MAAs and carotenoids at high UV-threat resulted in lower reproduction. In all, these results showed that carotenoids and MAAs are complementary substances, i.e., one is high when the other is low, and copepods are, hence, able to adjust their blend of different UV-protective compounds to optimize their defenses to the threats of UV and predation. These defense systems may buffer against direct food-web interactions and help the zooplankton to survive in environments with high UV threat.

  • 27.
    Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lymer, David
    Vrede, Katarina
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bacterioplankton growth and nutrient use efficiencies under variable organic carbon and inorganic phosphorus ratios2006In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 52, no 2, 258-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We carried out enclosure experiments in an unproductive lake in northern Sweden and studied the effects of enrichment with different dissolved organic carbon (glucose)/inorganic phosphorous (DOC/Pi) ratios on bacterioplankton production (BP), growth efficiency (BGE), nutrient use efficiency (BNUE), growth rate, and specific respiration. We found considerable variation in BP, BGE, and BNUE along the tested DOC/Pi gradient. BGE varied between 0.87 and 0.24, with the highest values at low DOC/Pi ratios. BNUE varied between 40 and 9 g C g P−1, with high values at high DOC/Pi ratios. More DOC was thus allocated to growth when bacteria tended to be C-limited, and to respiration when bacteria were P-limited. Specific respiration was positively correlated with bacterial growth rate throughout the gradient. It is therefore possible that respiration was used to support growth in P-limited bacteria. The results indicated that BP can be limited by Pi when BNUE is at its maximum, by organic C when BGE is at its maximum, and by dual organic C and Pi limitation when BNUE and BGE have suboptimal values.

  • 28.
    Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Hickler, T.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Links between terrestrial primary production and bacterial production and respiration in lakes in a climate gradient in subarctic Sweden2008In: Ecosystems, Vol. 11, 367-376 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared terrestrial net primary production (NPP) and terrestrial export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with lake water heterotrophic bacterial activity in 12 headwater lake catchments along an altitude gradient in subarctic Sweden. Modelled NPP declined strongly with altitude and annual air temperature decreases along the altitude gradient (6ºC between the warmest and the coldest catchment). Estimated terrestrial DOC export to the lakes was closely correlated to NPP. Heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) and respiration (BR) were mainly based on terrestrial organic carbon and strongly correlated with the terrestrial DOC export. Excess respiration over PP of the pelagic system was similar to net emission of CO2 in the lakes. BR and CO2 emission made up considerably higher shares of the terrestrial DOC input in warm lakes than in cold lakes, implying that respiration and the degree of net heterotrophy in the lakes were dependant not only on terrestrial export of DOC, but also on characteristics in the lakes which changed along the gradient and affected the bacterial metabolization of allochthonous DOC. The study showed close links between terrestrial primary production, terrestrial DOC export and bacterial activity in lakes and how these relationships were dependant on air temperature. Increases in air temperature in high latitude unproductive systems might have considerable consequences for lake water productivity and release of CO2 to the atmosphere, which are ultimately determined by terrestrial primary production.

  • 29.
    Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Biomass and structure of planktonic communities along an air temperature gradient in subarctic Sweden2010In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 55, no 3, 691-700 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Air temperature will probably have pronounced effects on the composition of plankton communities in northern lake ecosystems, either via indirect effects on the export of essential elements from catchments or through direct effects of water temperature and the ice-free period on the behaviour of planktonic organisms.

    2. We assessed the role of temperature by comparing planktonic communities in 15 lakes along a 6 °C air temperature gradient in subarctic Sweden.

    3. We found that the biomass of phytoplankton, bacterioplankton and the total planktonic biomass were positively related to air temperature, probably as a result of climatic controls on the export of nitrogen from the catchment (which affects phytoplankton biomass) and dissolved organic carbon (affecting bacterioplankton biomass).

    4. The structure of the zooplankton community, and top down effects on phytoplankton, were apparently not related to temperature but mainly to trophic interactions ultimately dependent on the presence of fish in the lakes.

    5. Our results suggest that air temperature regimes and long-term warming can have strong effects on the planktonic biomass in high latitude lakes. Effects of temperature on the structure of the planktonic community might be less evident unless warming permits the invasion of fish into previous fishless lakes.

  • 30.
    Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Blomqvist, P
    Allochthonous organic carbon decreases pelagic energy mobilization in lakes2003In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 48, no 4, 1711-1716 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, it has been Shown that unproductive lakes worldwide are net heterotrophic because bacterial respiration of allochthonous. organic carbon (AOC) makes community respiration exceed primary production. Net heterotrophy means that aquatic systems are net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere but also that bacterial utilization of AOC increases bacterioplankton production (BP) and bacterial uptake of limiting inorganic nutrients at the expense of phytoplankton production (PP). We studied 15 unproductive lakes in northern Sweden with dissolved organic carbon concentrations between 3 and 22 mg L-1. We found a highly significant negative relationship between the degree of heterotrophy and total pelagic energy mobilization (PP + BP based on AOC) per unit of limiting nutrient. We suggest that this is because the high cell phosphorous (P) requirement of bacteria makes energy mobilization per P unit considerably lower in bacterioplankton than in phytoplankton. We also suggest that the productivity of the entire pelagic ecosystem is determined by the availability of inorganic nutrients and AOC and by whether nutrients are allocated to BP or PP.

  • 31.
    Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Carbon dioxide supersaturation promotes primary production in lakes2012In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 15, no 6, 527-532 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecology Letters (2012) Abstract A majority of the worlds lakes are supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2). By experimental manipulation of the CO2 concentration in supersaturated boreal lakes, we demonstrate that phytoplankton primary production was up to 10 times higher in supersaturated lake water in comparison with water with CO2 at equilibrium concentrations and that CO2, together with nutrients, explained most of the variation in pelagic primary production and phytoplankton biomass over a wide variety of unproductive lakes. These results suggest that phytoplankton can be co-limited by CO2 and nutrients in unproductive lakes. As import of terrestrial organic carbon and its subsequent microbial mineralisation in lakes is a driving force of CO2-supersaturation our results suggest that lake productivity and carbon cycling may respond to variations in terrestrial organic carbon export, (e.g. caused by land use or climate change) in ways not described before.

  • 32.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sources of carbon dioxide supersaturation in clearwater and humic lakes in northern Sweden2003In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 6, no 3, 224-235 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partial pressure (pCO(2)) and flux to the atmosphere of carbon dioxide (CO2) were studied in northern alpine and forest lakes along a gradient of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content (0.4-9.9 mg L-1). Sixteen lakes were each sampled three times over the course of the ice-free season, and an additional 35 lakes were sampled once at midsummer. pCO(2) data were acquired in the field by a headspace equilibration technique. Most lakes were supersaturated with CO2 along the entire DOC gradient, with relatively small seasonal differences. pCO(2) was positively correlated to DOC content, reflecting a close dependence between allochthonous DOC in-put and heterotrophic respiration in the lakes. Fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere were estimated from the pCO(2) measurements. Benthic respiration was indicated to be important for CO2 emission in lakes with high DOC concentrations. In lakes with low DOC concentrations, pelagic mineralization alone was sufficient to account for a large part of the estimated fluxes.

  • 33.
    Jonsson, Micael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hedström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Stenroth, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hotchkiss, Erin R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vasconcelos, Francisco Rivera
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Climate change modifies the size structure of assemblages of emerging aquatic insects2015In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 60, no 1, 78-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to not only raise water temperatures, but also to cause brownification of aquatic ecosystems via increased inputs of terrestrial dissolved organic matter. While efforts have been made to understand how increased temperature and brownification separately influence aquatic food webs, their interactive effects have been less investigated. Further, although climate change effects on aquatic ecosystems likely will propagate to terrestrial consumers via changes in aquatic insect emergence, this has rarely been studied. We investigated the effect of climate change on aquatic insect emergence, in a large-scale outdoor pond facility where 16 sections - each containing natural food webs including a fish top-consumer population - were subjected to warming (3 degrees C above ambient temperatures) and/or brownification (by adding naturally humic stream water). Aquatic insect emergence was measured biweekly over 18weeks. We found no effect of warming or brownification on total emergent insect dry mass. However, warming significantly reduced the number of emergent Chironomidae, while numbers of larger taxa, Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera, remained unchanged. On average, 57% and 58% fewer Chironomidae emerged from the warmed clear and humic pond sections, respectively. This substantial decrease in emergent Chironomidae resulted in a changed community structure and on average larger individuals emerging from warm sections as well as from humic sections under ambient conditions. There was also a weak influence of fish biomass on the size structure of emergent aquatic insects, with a positive relationship between individual insect size and total fish biomass, but effects of fish were clearly subordinate to those of warming. Climate change impacts on aquatic systems can have widespread consequences also for terrestrial systems, as aquatic insects are ubiquitous and their emergence represents an important resource flow from aquatic to terrestrial environments. While we found that neither warming nor brownification quantitatively changed total aquatic insect emergence biomass, the warming-induced decrease in number of emergent Chironomidae and the subsequent increase in average body size will likely impact terrestrial consumers relying on emergent aquatic insect as prey.

  • 34.
    Karlsson, J
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Byström, P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Littoral energy mobilization dominates energy supply for top consumers in subarctic lakes2005In: Limnol. Oceanogr., Vol. 50, 538-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Different carbon support for community respiration and secondary production in unproductive lakes2007In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 116, no 10, 1691-1696 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the allocation of allochthonous organic carbon (AlloOC) to pelagic respiration and biomass production in unproductive lakes. Metabolic process rates and stable isotopic composition (delta C-13) of crustacean zooplankton and respired CO2 were measured in the epilimnion of 13 forest lakes in northern Sweden. The delta C-13 of zooplankton was low (-31.2 to -38.0 parts per thousand) compared to that of respired CO2 (-28.4 to -30.6 parts per thousand), implying that the relative importance of AlloOC was lower for zooplankton (ca 40%) than for respiration (ca 80%). Combining delta C-13 and carbon flux data revealed that a large amount of metabolized AlloOC was lost in respiration, compared to the amount transferred to zooplankton (< 3%). Thus, despite large respiratory losses, AlloOC was still important for zooplankton growth, implying a high supply of AlloOC in comparison to phytoplankton generated organic carbon in the lakes.

  • 36.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Winter respiration of allochthonous and autochthonous organic carbon in a subarctic clear-water lake2008In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 53, no 3, 948-954 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied a small subarctic lake to assess the magnitude of winter respiration and the organic carbon (OC) source for this respiration. The concentration and stable isotopic composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) accumulating in the lake water under ice was analyzed over one winter (7 months). The DIC concentration increased and the d13C of DIC decreased over time, with the greatest changes at the lake bottom. Winter respiration was 26% of annual respiration in the lake. Keeling plot analysis demonstrated that the d13C of respired DIC varied spatially, high d13C values occurring at shallow (2.5 m, 21.7‰) compared with intermediate (4 m, 25.1‰) and deep (6 m, 27.8‰) locations in the lake. The variation in the d13C of respired DIC was related to the variation in the d13C of the sediments between locations, suggesting that sediment OC supported much of the winter respiration and that the dominant OC source for respiration was OC from benthic algae at shallow locations and settled OC, of predominately terrestrial origin, at deep locations. The respiration of OC from benthic algae constituted 55% of the winter respiration, equaling 54% of the primary production by benthic algae the previous summer. The study indicates the importance of temporal and spatial variation in respiration for the metabolism and net DIC production in unproductive high-latitude lakes; both allochthonous and autochthonous carbon can contribute to winter DIC accumulation and, consequently, to spring CO2 emissions from lakes.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Berggren, M.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Laudon, H.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Response to Comment: Terrestrial support of pelagic consumers in unproductive lakes- Uncertainty and potential in assessments using stable isotopes2014In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 59, no 5, 1800-1803 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Berggren, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Terrestrial organic matter support of lake food webs: Evidence from lake metabolism and stable hydrogen isotopes of consumers2012In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 57, no 4, 1042-1048 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We quantified the utilization of terrestrial organic matter (OM) in the food web of a humic lake by analyzing the metabolism and the consumers' stable isotopic (C, H, N) composition in benthic and pelagic habitats. Terrestrial OM inputs (3 g C m(-2) d(-1)) to the lake greatly exceeded autochthonous OM production (3 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) in the lake. Heterotrophic bacterial growth (19 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) and community respiration (115 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) were high relative to algal photosynthesis and were predominantly (> 85%) supported by terrestrial OM in both habitats. Consequently, terrestrial OM fueled most (85%) of the total production at the base of the lake's food web (i.e., the sum of primary and bacterial production). Despite the uncertainties of quantitatively estimating resource use based on stable isotopes, terrestrial OM clearly also supported around half the zooplankton (47%), macrozoobenthos (63%), and fish (57%) biomass. These results indicate that, although rates of terrestrial OM inputs were around three orders of magnitude greater than that of autochthonous OM production, the use of the two resources by higher trophic levels was roughly equal. The disproportionally low reliance on terrestrial OM at higher trophic levels, compared with its high rates of input and high support of basic biomass production in the lake, suggests that autochthonous resources could not be completely replaced by terrestrial resources and indicates an upper limit to terrestrial support of lake food webs.

  • 39.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Gudasz, Cristian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rodriguez, Patricia
    Hein, Catherine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Terrestrial organic matter input suppresses biomass production in lake ecosystems2015In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 96, no 11, 2870-2876 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terrestrial ecosystems export large amounts of organic carbon (t-OC) but the net effect of this OC on the productivity of recipient aquatic ecosystems is largely unknown. In this study of boreal lakes, we show that the relative contribution of t-OC to individual top consumer (fish) biomass production, and to most of their potential prey organisms, increased with the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dominated by t-OC sources) in water. However, the biomass and production of top consumers decreased with increasing concentration of DOC, despite their substantial use (up to 60%) of t-OC. Thus, the results suggest that although t-OC supports individual consumer growth in lakes to a large extent, t-OC input suppresses rather than subsidizes population biomass production.

  • 40.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Ask, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Light limitation of nutrient-poor lake ecosystems2009In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, Vol. 460, 506-509 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Productivity denotes the rate of biomass synthesis in ecosystems and is a fundamental characteristic that frames ecosystem function and management. Limitation of productivity by nutrient availability is an established paradigm for lake ecosystems1, 2, 3. Here, we assess the relevance of this paradigm for a majority of the world's small, nutrient-poor lakes, with different concentrations of coloured organic matter4, 5. By comparing small unproductive lakes along a water colour gradient, we show that coloured terrestrial organic matter controls the key process for new biomass synthesis (the benthic primary production) through its effects on light attenuation. We also show that this translates into effects on production and biomass of higher trophic levels (benthic invertebrates and fish). These results are inconsistent with the idea that nutrient supply primarily controls lake productivity, and we propose that a large share of the world's unproductive lakes, within natural variations of organic carbon and nutrient input, are limited by light and not by nutrients. We anticipate that our result will have implications for understanding lake ecosystem function and responses to environmental change. Catchment export of coloured organic matter is sensitive to short-term natural variability and long-term, large-scale changes, driven by climate and different anthropogenic influences6, 7. Consequently, changes in terrestrial carbon cycling will have pronounced effects on most lake ecosystems by mediating changes in light climate and productivity of lakes.

  • 41.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Crill, Patrick
    Förster, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Jackowicz-Korczynski, Marcin
    Kokfelt, Ulla
    Roehm, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rosén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Quantifying the relative importance of lake emissions in the carbon budget of a subarctic catchment2010In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 115, G03006-6 PP p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change and thawing of permafrost will likely result in increased decomposition of terrestrial organic carbon and subsequent carbon emissions to the atmosphere from terrestrial and aquatic systems. The quantitative importance of mineralization of terrestrial organic carbon in lakes in relation to terrestrial carbon fluxes is poorly understood and a serious drawback for the understanding of carbon budgets. We studied a subarctic lake in an area of discontinuous permafrost to assess the quantitative importance of lake carbon emission for the catchment carbon balance. Estimates of net ecosystem production and stable carbon-isotope composition of dissolved organic carbon in the lake water suggest substantial input and respiration of terrestrial organic carbon in the lake. The lake was a net source of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere at ice breakup in spring and during the whole ice-free period. The carbon emission from the lake was similar in magnitude to the terrestrial net release of carbon to the atmosphere. The results indicate that lakes are important sources of catchment carbon emission, potentially increasing the positive feedback from permafrost thawing on global warming.

  • 42.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Global Change and the High-Latitude Environment2008In: EOS: Transactions, ISSN 0096-3941, Vol. 89, no 10, 97-97 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High Latitude Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems: Interactions and Response to Environmental Change; Abisko, Sweden, 11–14 September 2007; Terrestrial and aquatic scientists took part in a workshop in Sweden to discuss cross-system linkages that strongly influence the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, which effects may be altered by future environmental change. Sixty-five researchers, mainly from northern Europe and North America, attended the meeting.

  • 43.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lundin, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    High emission of carbon dioxide and methane during ice thaw in high latitude lakes2013In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 40, no 6, 1123-1127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The winter period is seldom included in the estimates of aquatic-atmospheric carbon exchange. In this study we quantified the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) over 3 years from 12 small subarctic lakes. The lakes accumulated consistent and high amounts of CO2 and CH4 (56–97% as CO2) over the winter, resulting in a high flux during ice thaw. The CO2 flux during ice thaw increased with increasing mean depth of the lakes, while the CH4 flux was high in lakes surrounded by mires. The ice thaw period was quantitatively important to the annual gas balances of the lakes. For nine of the lakes, 11 to 55% of the annual flux occurred during thaw. For three of the lakes with an apparent net annual CO2 uptake, including the thaw period reversed the balance from sink to source. Our results suggest that the ice thaw period is critically important for the emissions of CO2 and CH4 in small lakes.

  • 44.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Respiration of allochthonous organic carbon in unproductive forest lakes determined by the Keeling plot method2007In: Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 52, no 2, 603-608 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We carried out short-term (2 d) experiments in nine unproductive lakes in northern Sweden in order to investigate organic carbon sources supporting lake water respiration. Surface water was incubated in gas-tight bottles in the dark, and the concentration and isotopic composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured at the start and end of the incubations. Keeling plot analyses revealed that the d13C of the respired carbon was between -28.4% and -30.6% in the lakes and that the respired carbon was mainly of allochthonous organic carbon (AlloOC) origin. The respiration of AlloOC corresponded well with metabolic imbalances indicated by negative net ecosystem production (NEP) values in the lake waters. Keeling plot analysis of DIC accumulating in the hypolimnion of two lakes during summer stratification showed d13C values of around -26.6% for excess DIC, implying that the accumulation of DIC was mainly derived from respiration of AlloOC. Our data provide direct evidence that net heterotrophy of these lakes is caused by input and respiration of AlloOC. We conclude that the Keeling plot method is a powerful technique that enables characterization and quantification of the organic carbon sources contributing to respiration in aquatic systems.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Similar relationships between pelagic primary and bacterial production in clearwater and humic lakes2002In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 83, no 10, 2902-2910 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the relationship between planktonic primary production (PP) and bacterial production (BP) in 16 subarctic lakes along an altitude gradient extending from colored coniferous forest lakes to clearwater high alpine lakes. We tested the hypothesis that there was a shift from low to high PP:BP ratios along this gradient. The clearwater alpine lakes had low PP:BP ratios, generally well below 1.0, while the highest ratios were-found in the forest lakes. In contradiction to our hypothesis, the pelagic systems of the clearwater lakes were thus dominated by bacterial energy mobilization from external carbon sources. In this respect the alpine lakes were similar to highly humic lakes. We suggest that the relationship between C, N, and P plays a critical role in determining the PP:BP ratio, and that the N:P ratio in particular can be critical for development of PP or BP dominance in the pelagic systems of unproductive lakes.

  • 46.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bacterioplankton production in lakes along an altitude gradient in the subarctic north of Sweden2001In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 42, no 3, 372-382 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined changes in bacterioplankton standing stock and production in subarctic lakes in the north of Sweden to elucidate their coupling to lake physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. Sixteen lakes situated along an altitude gradient extending from the coniferous forest to the high-alpine belt were studied during 1998 and 1999. The summer mean bacterial numbers and production varied substantially between the lakes, with a general trend toward decreasing values with increasing altitude. The results demonstrate that P probably restricted bacterial utilization of DOC in the coniferous forest lakes, while low DOC concentrations limited bacterial growth during the summer in the alpine lakes. The primary production of plankton was insufficient to support bacterial production in the lakes. High input of allochthonous DOC to the alpine lakes in spring was sufficient both to increase the bacterial production and to induce P-limitation. As a consequence, there was a tendency toward higher bacterial activity in the spring compared to the summer in the alpine lakes. The results indicate that most of the bacterial standing stock and production are supported by allochthonous DOC plus DOC from benthic production, and more or less limited by the phosphorus supply. We therefore suggest that bacteria populations in subarctic lakes may be indirectly affected by climate variations through its impact on the input of DOC and nutrients from the lake catchments.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Productivity of high-latitude lakes: climate effect inferred from altitude gradient2005In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 11, no 5, 710-715 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is predicted to be dramatic at high latitudes. Still, climate impact on high latitude lake ecosystems is poorly understood. We studied 15 subarctic lakes located in a climate gradient comprising an air temperature difference of about 6&DEG; C. We show that lake water productivity varied by one order of magnitude along the temperature gradient. This variation was mainly caused by variations in the length of the ice-free period and, more importantly, in the supply of organic carbon and inorganic nutrients, which followed differences in terrestrial vegetation cover along the gradient. The results imply that warming will have rapid effects on the productivity of high latitude lakes, by prolongation of ice-free periods. However, a more pronounced consequence will be a delayed stimulation of the productivity following upon changes of the lakes terrestrial surroundings and subsequent increasing input of elements that stimulate the production of lake biota.

  • 48.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Meili, M
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Control of zooplankton dependence on allochthonous organic carbon in humic and clear-water lakes in northern Sweden2003In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 48, no 1, 269-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared the stable carbon isotopic composition (delta(13)C) of crustacean zooplankton with that of potential carbon sources in 15 lakes in northern Sweden with different dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (2-9 mg L-1) to test the hypothesis that zooplankton depended more on allochthonous carbon in humic lakes than in clear-water lakes. Based on delta(13)C signature, we found that the pool of organic matter in the lakes was dominated by carbon of allochthonous origin over the whole DOC gradient. Zooplankton were generally depleted in C-13 compared to organic matter in the catchment, particulate organic matter in the lake water, and shallow surface sediment. However, the isotopic composition of zooplankton could not be explained without a significant contribution from both allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources in all lakes. The relative importance of these two carbon sources did not relate to the concentration of, or proportion between, allochthonous and autochthonous organic carbon in the water. Instead, the proportion between allochthonous and autochthonous carbon in the crustacean zooplankton was consistent with a rather conservative use of the energy mobilized by bacterioplankton and phytoplankton in the lakes.

  • 49.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Meili, M
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    δ15N of zooplankton species in subarctic lakes in northern Sweden: Effects of diet and trophic fractionation2004In: Freshwater Biology, Vol. 49, 526-534 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. To assess the use of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) for reconstructing trophic relationships in planktonic food webs, crustacean zooplankton species and pelagic dissolved and particulate matter were analysed in 14 subarctic lakes in northern Sweden. The lakes are situated along an altitudinal gradient and show a substantial variation in nutrient content and energy mobilization by bacterioplankton and phytoplankton.

    2. The δ15N of dissolved and particulate matter was comparatively low, suggesting efficient N recycling and low losses of depleted N from the pelagic zone of these unproductive lakes.

    3. Copepods had a systematically higher δ15N than cladocerans, with an average difference of 3.1–4.9‰ within lakes, implying different trophic positions of the two groups. Comparisons of nitrogen pools and energy fluxes suggest that the low cladoceran δ15N was a result of feeding on bacteria.

    4. The difference in δ15N between copepods and cladocerans declined with decreasing bacterioplankton production among lakes, due either to increasing trophic isotope fractionation or decreasing relative importance of bacteria in the diet of cladocerans.

  • 50.
    Karlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Lymer, David
    Vrede, Katarina
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Differences in efficiency of carbon transfer from dissolved organic carbon to two zooplankton groups: an enclosure experiment in an oligotrophic lake2007In: Aquatic Sciences, Vol. 69, no 1, 108-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We added dissolved organic carbon (C) in various amounts to 6 enclosures in an oligotrophic subarctic lake to assess how bacterioplankton growth on dissolved organic C affects the growth of calanoid copepod (Eudiaptomus graciloides) and cladoceran (Daphnia longispina) zooplankton. Organic C was added as glucose (12.5 to 400 µgC L−1d−1) and was isotopically distinct (−11.7 ‰) from lakewater organic C (<−27.2‰). All enclosures were also enriched with the same amounts of inorganic nitrogen (30 µgN L−1d−1 as NH4NO3) and inorganic phosphorus (2 µgP L−1d−1 as Na3PO4). The results showed a direct relationship between bacterial growth on dissolved organic C and incorporation of bacterial biomass into crustacean zooplankton. After 9 days, D. longispina and E. graciloides contained glucose-C in all treatments and the incorporation of glucose-C by zooplankton was strongly correlated with bacterial growth on glucose-C.δ15N data revealed different trophic positions of the two crustaceans, suggesting that D. longispina fed directly on bacteria while E. graciloides incorporated bacterial C by consumption of bacterivorus protozoans. Greater incorporation of glucose-C in D. longispina than in E. graciloides was explained by higher individual growth rates in D. longispina, and this difference between the two zooplankters increased as the bacterial production increased. Thus, the results show that the transfer of dissolved organic C through the food web can be more efficient via cladocerans than via calanoid copepods and that the effect becomes more pronounced as bacterial energy mobilization increases.

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